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Sandra Day O Connor

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NATIONAL
July 25, 2012 | By Jamie Goldberg, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Attacks on Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. as a traitor to conservative ideals for voting to uphold most of President Obama's healthcare law reflect a lack of knowledge about how the American justice system works, retired Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor said. "It's unfortunate because I think comments like that demonstrate only too well a lack of understanding that some of our citizens have about the role of the judicial branch," O'Connor said at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing Wednesday in response to a question from ChairmanPatrick J. Leahy (D-Vt)
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NEWS
April 25, 2013 | By Mark Z. Barabak
PHOENIX - Sandra Day O'Connor is, obviously, quite familiar with historic firsts. Some 200-plus years after the nation's birth she became the first woman to sit on the U.S. Supreme Court. There have been three more women appointed since, including the first Latina, a development she welcomes as a way of ending the novelty; remarkably, in just about a generation, the notion of women serving on the nation's high court has become rather unremarkable - part of "the normal course of events," as she put it. So the obvious question: Is America ready for a female president?
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NEWS
April 25, 2013 | By Mark Z. Barabak
PHOENIX - Sandra Day O'Connor is, obviously, quite familiar with historic firsts. Some 200-plus years after the nation's birth she became the first woman to sit on the U.S. Supreme Court. There have been three more women appointed since, including the first Latina, a development she welcomes as a way of ending the novelty; remarkably, in just about a generation, the notion of women serving on the nation's high court has become rather unremarkable - part of "the normal course of events," as she put it. So the obvious question: Is America ready for a female president?
NATIONAL
July 25, 2012 | By Jamie Goldberg, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Attacks on Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. as a traitor to conservative ideals for voting to uphold most of President Obama's healthcare law reflect a lack of knowledge about how the American justice system works, retired Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor said. "It's unfortunate because I think comments like that demonstrate only too well a lack of understanding that some of our citizens have about the role of the judicial branch," O'Connor said at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing Wednesday in response to a question from ChairmanPatrick J. Leahy (D-Vt)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2001
Alan Dershowitz thinks we need to find a way to police the motives of Supreme Court justices for voting the way they do (Commentary, Dec. 28). Because Justice Sandra Day O'Connor expressed a private opinion that she wants to retire and prefers that a Republican president nominate her replacement, Dershowitz is sure her vote with the majority of justices was not her honest interpretation of the Constitution and federal law. He wants law clerks to...
NEWS
October 5, 1990 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor refused Thursday to reinstate California's campaign contribution limits, prompting Republican gubernatorial candidate Pete Wilson to announce he will begin seeking large donations. For the second time in less than a week, O'Connor denied without comment a request that she block last week's lower court decision striking down the contribution limits of Proposition 73 as unconstitutional.
NEWS
August 30, 1997 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor was urged Friday to halt enforcement of Proposition 209, the California initiative that bars affirmative action programs in public employment, education and contracting.
NEWS
May 27, 1988 | United Press International
Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, mentioned as a potential Republican candidate for vice president, said she is not interested. "I most assuredly am not considering any other position in or out of government, and do not expect to do so in the future," O'Connor, 58, said in a statement released by the court Thursday. O'Connor, the first and only woman to serve on the nation's highest court, was appointed by President Reagan in 1981.
NATIONAL
January 29, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The Supreme Court stepped in to temporarily continue isolating terrorism suspects at the U.S. Navy base in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Justice Sandra Day O'Connor granted a request from the Bush administration to stop a lower court from communicating with a detainee at the base. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals had planned to notify the detainee, Falen Gherebi, of the court's ruling in December that Guantanamo prisoners should be allowed to see lawyers and have access to courts.
NATIONAL
May 26, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Too many people think the American criminal and court system is racist, and lawyers should work to achieve "both the perception and the reality of equal justice," Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor told graduates of George Washington University's law school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2011 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
Only about a third of American adults can name all three branches of government, and a third can't name any. Fewer than a third of eighth graders could identify the historical purpose of the Declaration of Independence. This slim knowledge of civics — and the potential risk it poses to American democracy — captured the attention of retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor. During a recent trip to Los Angeles, she talked up iCivics, an expanding online program aimed at middle school students.
OPINION
September 25, 2011 | By Meg Waite Clayton
After his first argument before Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, one prominent Southern lawyer was certain the Supreme Court would rule in his favor — because, he said, she was "flirting" with him. The comment speaks volumes about the speaker, but it also says something about the person who weaved her way through a male-dominated world to become the first female justice 30 years ago today, and served 25 years on the court. O'Connor wasn't chosen because she looked the part, but the fact that her pearls and lavender suits with skirts wouldn't alarm the public wasn't inconsequential.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2009 | Valerie J. Nelson
John J. O'Connor III, a lawyer who went to Washington in a historic role, as the husband of the first female U.S. Supreme Court justice, has died. He was 79. O'Connor died Wednesday in Phoenix of complications arising from Alzheimer's disease, the court said in a statement. He had been diagnosed with the disease nearly two decades ago. After Sandra Day O'Connor became the first woman to serve on the nation's highest court in 1981, her husband gave up a partnership at a venerable Phoenix law firm to accompany her to Washington.
BUSINESS
November 1, 2005 | Molly Selvin, Times Staff Writer
Although Samuel A. Alito Jr. has spent his entire legal career on the government payroll, President Bush's nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court has a strong free-market philosophy likely to please corporate America, legal experts said Monday. In decisions he has written since joining the U.S.
BOOKS
October 23, 2005 | Jeffrey Rosen, Jeffrey Rosen is a law professor at George Washington University and legal affairs editor of the New Republic. He is the author of "The Naked Crowd: Reclaiming Security and Freedom in an Anxious Age" and the forthcoming book "The Most Democratic Branch: How the Courts Serve America."
EVER since Justice Sandra Day O'Connor announced her intention to retire from the U.S. Supreme Court, Democrats have hailed the former Republican legislator from Arizona as a paragon of pragmatism and moderation. Now that President Bush's controversial choice to replace O'Connor is prepping for a November confirmation fight, senators from both parties are wondering openly whether Harriet E. Miers would be a lawyerly pragmatist in the O'Connor mold or a conservative ideologue in disguise.
NATIONAL
July 3, 2005 | Doyle McManus, Times Staff Writer
Like vast armies taking up positions on the eve of battle, interest groups on the right and left are readying for a fight over President Bush's nomination of a successor to Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor. Both sides agree that the battle is likely to be fierce. The stakes are high: O'Connor has been one of the court's swing voters whose views determine how cases are decided.
NEWS
May 2, 1987 | Associated Press
Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor on Friday canceled a speech to Republican political action committee contributors, saying that her appearance before such a group would be inappropriate. O'Connor changed her mind on the engagement after it was reported that it might violate the American Bar Assn.'s code of judicial conduct. The non-binding ethical guide for the legal profession holds that a judge should not "make speeches for a political organization" or "solicit funds for . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1997 | From Associated Press
A California official made an emergency request of a Supreme Court justice Wednesday to reinstate the state's term limits law, calling his plea a states' rights issue and defense of the initiative process.
NATIONAL
July 2, 2005 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, the first woman to serve on the Supreme Court and its decisive voice on such critical issues as abortion, affirmative action and religion, announced Friday that she was retiring. Her husband, John, is suffering from Alzheimer's disease, her friends report, and O'Connor said in a brief statement that she needed to spend more time with him.
NATIONAL
July 2, 2005 | NICOLE GAOUETTE, Times Staff Writer
Long before she arrived in 1981 as the first woman to serve in the august chambers of the Supreme Court, she had learned to ride horses, had plinked bottles with a .22-caliber rifle and had tended to sick cows on her father's ranch in the rough-and-tumble Arizona desert. She had been an Army lawyer in Germany, launched her own law firm in an Arizona strip mall and served in that state's legislature.
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