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Sandra Hutchens

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OPINION
November 13, 2010 | Patt Morrison
Sandra Hutchens understands when people ask to see the closet -- the office hideaway where her predecessor, disgraced former Orange County Sheriff-Coroner Michael S. Carona, kept a secret video recording system and a safe and who knows what else. It's just a closet now, cleaned out by Hutchens, who had a lot of metaphorical cleaning on her to-do list when she took over Carona's job in June 2008. The longtime Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy and division chief was comfortably retired in O.C. when her husband urged her to pursue the job that Carona, convicted on one count in a five-count corruption trial, was forced to leave.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2014 | By Jill Cowan
The Orange County Sheriff's Department may hire temporary staff to help process a flood of concealed weapons permit applications in the wake of its decision to loosen the county's gun restrictions. More than 500 people have applied for concealed weapons permits in Orange County in the last 10 days, nearly as many as applied all of last year. Sheriff Sandra Hutchens announced the policy change last week in response to a pro-gun U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruling that California counties may no longer require residents who want to carry concealed firearms to demonstrate a specific, individualized need to do so. Because the ruling is not yet final, and if successfully appealed may never take effect, Hutchens said applicants are encouraged to submit a statement of “good cause,” even though it's no longer required.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2008 | Stuart Pfeifer and Christine Hanley, Times Staff Writers
With her tailored suits and thoughtful, confident demeanor, new Orange County Sheriff Sandra Hutchens appears more like a polished corporate executive than a peace officer. But make no mistake about it: There's a lot of street cop in the new leader of California's second-largest sheriff's department. Hutchens spent the early years of her career patrolling violent inner-city neighborhoods south of downtown Los Angeles, arresting gang members, racing to assist deputies in danger and, in one defining moment, shooting and killing a man carrying a handgun.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2014 | By Abby Sewell and Robert Faturechi
The newly named interim sheriff of Los Angeles County, current Orange County Undersheriff John L. Scott, said Tuesday that he would continue the momentum of reform in the beleaguered department. Flanked by four of the five county supervisors, Scott said, "I can assure you, I'm not going to be a place-holder here in L.A. County. I will begin the process immediately of restoring both the dignity to the men and women of L.A. County and the confidence and trust of the public that we serve.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2008 | Stuart Pfeifer and Christine Hanley, Times Staff Writers
Newly appointed Orange County Sheriff Sandra Hutchens said Tuesday that she intends to review all the concealed-weapons permits that her indicted predecessor issued and revoke those of gun owners who can't prove a legal need to carry the weapons. When former Sheriff Michael S. Carona resigned in January to focus on his upcoming federal corruption trial, he had issued more than 1,100 active carry permits -- among the most issued by any sheriff or police chief in the state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2008 | Christian Berthelsen, Christine Hanley and H.G. Reza, Times Staff Writers
Just after Orange County supervisors selected Sandra Hutchens as the first woman ever to lead the county's troubled Sheriff's Department, Santa Ana City Councilman Carlos Bustamante sidled up to a conservative blogger with a joke. "I kept telling the chief," he said, referring to Santa Ana Police Chief Paul Walters, who narrowly lost the sheriff's job, " 'Maybe we should get you some implants. Or a water bra.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2009 | Tami Abdollah
Orange County Sheriff Sandra Hutchens on Monday unveiled a dramatic reorganization of the department that will consolidate such major services as operations and investigations and cut captains who oversee training and special projects. The changes combine similar services under one supervisor and increase the sheriff's role in overall operations. They are intended to help offset the department's $28-million budget shortfall. Over the last three weeks, Hutchens has personally informed each member of her command staff whether they will stay or go. Those leaving include Assistant Sheriffs Jack Anderson and John B. Davis, as well as Capts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2012 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
Orange County Sheriff Sandra Hutchens announced Monday that she has begun chemotherapy treatment for breast cancer but will continue to actively lead one of the state's largest law enforcement agencies. During a news conference at department headquarters in Santa Ana, Hutchens said she was confident that she could still serve and aggressively combat the cancer. If she found that she couldn't handle the load, she said, "I'd make other arrangements. " Sheriff's officials said the department was notified of Hutchens' health problems about two weeks ago in a staff memo that was sent the day after she began chemotherapy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2010 | By Raja Abdulrahim, Los Angeles Times
More than two years after Orange County's top lawman was indicted on corruption charges, voters will finally decide who should run the state's second-largest sheriff's department. After Michael S. Carona's arrest and resignation, county supervisors deliberately reached outside the department to name a successor. Sandra Hutchens, who had spent decades with the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, was embraced as an "agent of change," a fresh face to lead a department that had endured years of upheaval.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2009 | Dana Parsons
Orange County Sheriff Sandra Hutchens doesn't have a 2010 election opponent yet, but she laid out what appeared to be a blueprint Monday for how she plans to win voter approval. Using the end of her first year in office as the hook, Hutchens cited changes she made in jail management, said she had restored public trust in the office and would fire any deputy caught lying in so-called "code of silence" situations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2012 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
Orange County Sheriff Sandra Hutchens announced Monday that she has begun chemotherapy treatment for breast cancer but will continue to actively lead one of the state's largest law enforcement agencies. During a news conference at department headquarters in Santa Ana, Hutchens said she was confident that she could still serve and aggressively combat the cancer. If she found that she couldn't handle the load, she said, "I'd make other arrangements. " Sheriff's officials said the department was notified of Hutchens' health problems about two weeks ago in a staff memo that was sent the day after she began chemotherapy.
OPINION
November 13, 2010 | Patt Morrison
Sandra Hutchens understands when people ask to see the closet -- the office hideaway where her predecessor, disgraced former Orange County Sheriff-Coroner Michael S. Carona, kept a secret video recording system and a safe and who knows what else. It's just a closet now, cleaned out by Hutchens, who had a lot of metaphorical cleaning on her to-do list when she took over Carona's job in June 2008. The longtime Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy and division chief was comfortably retired in O.C. when her husband urged her to pursue the job that Carona, convicted on one count in a five-count corruption trial, was forced to leave.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2010 | By Catherine Saillant and Raja Abdulrahim, Los Angeles Times
With a decisive mandate from voters, Sheriff Sandra Hutchens said Wednesday she is finally moving past critics who have characterized her as a liberal interloper out of touch with conservative Orange County. As she entered the department Wednesday morning, undersheriffs, lieutenants and secretaries burst into applause. "Welcome, elected sheriff," Undersheriff John Scott said. "Yes, remove the word 'appointed,' " Hutchens said. Hutchens took nearly 52% of the vote in Tuesday's election, defeating former Orange County Sheriff's Lt. Bill Hunt and Anaheim Deputy Police Chief Craig Hunter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2010 | By Raja Abdulrahim, Los Angeles Times
Appointed Orange County Sheriff Sandra Hutchens was holding a hefty 2-to-1 lead in early balloting Tuesday over her two opponents in her bid to win the endorsement of voters to continue leading a department still recovering from scandal. In Ventura County, Sheriff's Cmdr. Geoff Dean was leading Chief Deputy Dennis Carpenter, and in an Orange County race for an open supervisorial seat, Fullerton Councilman Shawn Nelson and Anaheim Councilman Harry Sidhu led a field of six candidates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2010 | By Raja Abdulrahim, Los Angeles Times
More than two years after Orange County's top lawman was indicted on corruption charges, voters will finally decide who should run the state's second-largest sheriff's department. After Michael S. Carona's arrest and resignation, county supervisors deliberately reached outside the department to name a successor. Sandra Hutchens, who had spent decades with the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, was embraced as an "agent of change," a fresh face to lead a department that had endured years of upheaval.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2010 | By Raja Abdulrahim
After Orange County's sheriff was indicted on corruption charges on 2007, supervisors made a point of looking beyond the county limits to find a replacement who was free of the cronyism and scandal that had tainted the office. A retired Los Angeles Sheriff's Department division chief, Sandra Hutchens was lauded by one county supervisor for being "removed from the political machinations in the county" and was seen as a welcome breath of fresh air in a department that had been led for decades by politically connected lawmen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2014 | By Jill Cowan
The Orange County Sheriff's Department may hire temporary staff to help process a flood of concealed weapons permit applications in the wake of its decision to loosen the county's gun restrictions. More than 500 people have applied for concealed weapons permits in Orange County in the last 10 days, nearly as many as applied all of last year. Sheriff Sandra Hutchens announced the policy change last week in response to a pro-gun U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruling that California counties may no longer require residents who want to carry concealed firearms to demonstrate a specific, individualized need to do so. Because the ruling is not yet final, and if successfully appealed may never take effect, Hutchens said applicants are encouraged to submit a statement of “good cause,” even though it's no longer required.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2010 | By Raja Abdulrahim
While Los Angeles County is releasing hundreds of inmates early because of budget cuts, Orange County Sheriff Sandra Hutchens is trying to avoid similar cuts by importing hundreds of new detainees. She has won approval to negotiate with the federal government for the Orange County jail system to house more than 800 immigration detainees. In return, the county would receive $40 million a year -- money Hutchens said would be used to avoid cutbacks in the jails and possible layoffs of deputies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2010 | By Paloma Esquivel
The Orange County Sheriff's Department will lay off one of its highest-ranking officers as well as 23 professional staff members this month as it grapples with a budget shortfall of more than $50 million. Among those who will lose their jobs is Assistant Sheriff Michael Hillmann, a four-decade veteran of the LAPD hired by Orange County Sheriff Sandra Hutchens to help lead the department in the wake of corruption allegations against her predecessor. Hillmann, 64, ran into controversy early on when he was caught sending text messages mocking activists and board members during a Board of Supervisors meeting early last year on the department's gun permit policies.
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