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Sandra Jensen

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MAGAZINE
April 14, 1996 | Celeste Fremon, Celeste Fremon's last piece for the magazine was on the mothers of Pico/Aliso
A small woman, her silk-fine blond hair cut fashionably chin-length, walks in an awkward, rolling gait to the microphone on the stage of the grand ballroom of Vancouver's Sheraton Landmark Hotel. Her body shape is un-muscled and pillowy. Her facial features are those commonly associated with Down syndrome--a high forehead inlaid with almond-shaped eyes tilted up at the outer corners, a jaw that tends to be slack in repose.
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NEWS
May 25, 1997 | Reuters
A woman with Down syndrome who battled for the right to have a heart and lung transplant has died, hospital officials said Saturday. She was 36. Sandra Jensen was admitted to Sutter General Hospital on May 4 and died Friday night surrounded by family, a hospital spokeswoman said. She would not disclose the cause of death but said an autopsy is planned this week. Jensen is thought to be the first person with Down syndrome to be given a heart and lung transplant.
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NEWS
May 25, 1997 | Reuters
A woman with Down syndrome who battled for the right to have a heart and lung transplant has died, hospital officials said Saturday. She was 36. Sandra Jensen was admitted to Sutter General Hospital on May 4 and died Friday night surrounded by family, a hospital spokeswoman said. She would not disclose the cause of death but said an autopsy is planned this week. Jensen is thought to be the first person with Down syndrome to be given a heart and lung transplant.
MAGAZINE
April 14, 1996 | Celeste Fremon, Celeste Fremon's last piece for the magazine was on the mothers of Pico/Aliso
A small woman, her silk-fine blond hair cut fashionably chin-length, walks in an awkward, rolling gait to the microphone on the stage of the grand ballroom of Vancouver's Sheraton Landmark Hotel. Her body shape is un-muscled and pillowy. Her facial features are those commonly associated with Down syndrome--a high forehead inlaid with almond-shaped eyes tilted up at the outer corners, a jaw that tends to be slack in repose.
NEWS
January 24, 1996 | Associated Press
A woman with Down's syndrome who was initially refused a heart-lung transplant because doctors didn't think she was smart enough to handle the aftereffects underwent the desperately needed operation Tuesday. Sandra Jensen, 35, is believed to be the first seriously retarded person in the United States to receive a major transplant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1997 | PETER NOAH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jodi Riddle, 22, became the nation's second person with Down syndrome to be approved for an organ transplant. Pending the stabilization of a thyroid condition, the Garden Grove resident will be placed on the United Network for Organ Sharing list to receive a heart-lung transplant at UC San Diego Medical Center. Riddle's health began to worsen about a year ago because of complications from a congenital heart condition.
MAGAZINE
June 2, 1996
It is disturbing to read of the continued ignorance and prejudice that confront those with developmental and other disabilities ("A Life Renewed," by Celeste Fremon, April 14). That Sandra Jensen's worth was judged by her alleged intellectual capability is a sad commentary. It is shocking that, 35 years ago, her mother's physician recommended placing her daughter in a state hospital. Sandra needed the love and nurturing of her family, not the specialized treatment designed for persons with behavioral excesses and deficits, or medical care not available in the community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1994 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six city employees are being laid off because of a continuing slowdown in new housing and business construction, City Administrator Robert W. Toone Jr. announced Monday. It's the fourth time in three years that Palmdale, one of the state's fastest growing cities during the 1980s, cut its work force with layoffs.
NEWS
June 12, 1996 | MAX VANZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ron and Patti Ranus, grief-stricken, looked at their 11-year-old daughter lying before them in the desert hospital, no hope for bringing her back from a brutal head injury caused by a dune buggy accident. Then, through the tears, they looked at each other. "Honey," Ron Ranus recalls saying, "I know it's too late for Cassie, but maybe we can keep someone else from going through this pain." He asked if she agreed with him that an organ donation would be the right thing to do.
FOOD
November 10, 1999 | DAVID KARP, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Wild rice traditionally evokes images of Native Americans flailing grain into canoes on Minnesota lakes. But the world's largest wild rice field actually is on a ranch in Modoc County, Calif., where antelope outnumber people. In the last quarter-century California's cultivated wild rice industry has outgrown Minnesota's to dominate production.
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