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Sandra Neilson

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SPORTS
August 29, 2002 | Dan Arritt
Australia's Shane Gould was as close to Mark Spitz as women's swimming had in 1972. Although she was only 15, she was predicted to win five gold medals. But the U.S. women were not convinced. Before the Olympics, they had T-shirts made for themselves that said, "All That Glitters Is Not Gould." They were right.
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SPORTS
August 29, 2002 | Dan Arritt
Australia's Shane Gould was as close to Mark Spitz as women's swimming had in 1972. Although she was only 15, she was predicted to win five gold medals. But the U.S. women were not convinced. Before the Olympics, they had T-shirts made for themselves that said, "All That Glitters Is Not Gould." They were right.
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NEWS
June 7, 1992
The San Gabriel Education Foundation has awarded grants to teachers in the San Gabriel School District for creative classroom projects. Barbara Gorton of the districtwide media lab received $5,000 for a consultant fee. Chris Murphy and Linda Olsen of the district disaster committee received $2,481 for a project that would secure computers in case of an earthquake.
SPORTS
September 3, 2002
Who Can't Win 'Em All? Six for Spitz Mark Spitz won his sixth gold medal, his fourth in an individual event, with a victory in the 100-meter freestyle. As in his previous races in Munich, including two relays, Spitz's time was a world record. This victory also gave him the record for most gold medals in a single Olympics. The record had been five, held by Italian fencer Nedo Nadi in Antwerp in 1920.
SPORTS
August 29, 1999 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In another century, he was a Los Angeles sports icon--the city's first Los Angeles-born world boxing champion. Solly Smith, born Solomon Garcia Smith in 1871, already had won and lost his world featherweight championship, in 1897 and 1898, before he was usurped on the Los Angeles popularity scale by Jim Jeffries, who won the heavyweight championship in 1899.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1985 | LYNDON STAMBLER, Times Staff Writer
One foggy Sunday morning, when most people were burrowing deeper under their bed covers, 20 men and women stripped down to their swimsuits on the Pacific Palisades beach and waded into the 63-degree water. After negotiating a strong surf, they swam toward a buoy in the middle of the bay until all that was visible was a line of arms plying the gray swells. The first 200 yards of the two-mile swim were cold and miserable, they said, until their heart rates increased.
NEWS
November 3, 1985 | LYNDON STAMBLER, Times Staff Writer
One foggy Sunday morning, when most people were burrowing deeper under their bedcovers, 20 men and women stripped down to their swimsuits on the Pacific Palisades beach and waded into the 63-degree water. After negotiating a strong surf, they swam toward a buoy in the middle of the bay until all that was visible was a line of arms plying through the gray swells. The first 200 yards of the two-mile swim were cold and miserable, they said, until their heart rates increased.
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