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Sandra R Tracey

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1987 | TED VOLLMER, Times Staff Writer
Sandra R. Tracey, 37, became the highest-ranking woman in Los Angeles County government Tuesday when the Board of Supervisors named her treasurer-tax collector to succeed her former boss, Chief Administrative Officer Richard Dixon. Tracey was selected for the $77,000-a-year post over more than 200 candidates vying for the job, which has been vacant since Dixon replaced James Hankla as chief administrative officer March 1.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1987 | TED VOLLMER, Times Staff Writer
Sandra R. Tracey, 37, became the highest-ranking woman in Los Angeles County government Tuesday when the Board of Supervisors named her treasurer-tax collector to succeed her former boss, Chief Administrative Officer Richard Dixon. Tracey was selected for the $77,000-a-year post over more than 200 candidates vying for the job, which has been vacant since Dixon replaced James Hankla as chief administrative officer March 1.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1988
The Los Angeles County tax collector's office will be open this Saturday and next from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. to help property owners who have not received or have lost their tax bills, County Treasurer Sandra R. Tracey said Thursday. Because Dec. 10 falls on Saturday, this year's deadline for avoiding late-payment penalties is Dec. 12. Regular hours for the office are 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1988
Los Angeles County properties with tax delinquencies of five years or more will be up for public sale Wednesday in Pasadena, Sandra R. Tracey, county treasurer and tax collector, announced. The public auction is scheduled for the Pasadena Center at 9 a.m. and will continue for three consecutive days or until all available properties have been offered for sale, Tracey said.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1987 | JONATHAN PETERSON, Times Staff Writer
Call it the kiwi connection. Los Angeles County has found a unique way to cut costs for its borrowing needs: It is offering $100 million worth of securities denominated in New Zealand currency. "It's real man-bites-dog stuff," said Roger Leaf, a vice president at First Boston Corp., which is underwriting the offering. "This is the first tax-exempt issue ever denominated in a foreign currency." Under the deal, the county is borrowing $100 million (U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1987 | JACK JONES, From Staff and Wire Reports
Advertising man Bob Rosenberg spent a nervous five hours while a pug dog named Paddington Pug was wandering loose around Culver City. The flashy collar Paddington Pug wore was a $20,000 diamond-studded necklace. Rosenberg says Paddington was adorned with the sparkler last Thursday at a photographer's studio to pose for an advertisement for Morgan & Co., the Westwood Village jewelry store owned by his master, Marcus Rosner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1987 | BILL BOYARSKY, Times City-County Bureau Chief
Expressing concern over Los Angeles County investment policies after the stock market crash, Supervisor Pete Schabarum on Tuesday initiated a study of how the county lends some of its billions of dollars to make money in the securities market. The Times reported Monday that county officials, concerned about volatile market conditions, have temporarily halted the program. After Schabarum introduced a motion demanding information, county Treasurer and Tax Collector Sandra R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1988 | VICTOR MERINA, Times Staff Writer
Proposed raises of up to 10.5% under a new merit pay plan for Los Angeles County government executives encountered heated opposition Thursday from employee groups and a county supervisor. Supervisor Kenneth Hahn, one of five board members who must vote on the prospective pay raises, called the recommendations exorbitant and said that some department heads should be replaced rather than rewarded.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1988 | VICTOR MERINA, Times Staff Writer
Poor training, employee errors and inadequate staffing in the Los Angeles County treasurer-tax collector's office contributed substantially to months-long delays in answering and correcting taxpayer problems, according to a county audit. A six-month review by the auditor-controller concludes that while the treasurer-tax collector has made progress in reducing a huge backlog of correspondence, more than 12,800 inquiries from taxpayers questioning their property tax bills remain unanswered.
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