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Sandra Race Cano

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1989 | MARIA NEWMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The daughter of a plaintiff in a landmark abortion rights case said Friday she has decided to join the campaign for a woman's right to abortion, a stance opposite that of her biological mother, an outspoken abortion foe. Melissa Able, 19, of Atlanta, said she will attend a massive pro-choice rally in Rancho Park on Sunday, her first foray into the loud and prolonged abortion rights fray.
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NEWS
December 10, 1989 | From Associated Press
Sandra Cano, one of the women whose Supreme Court cases established the right to abortion in 1973, was reunited Saturday with her first daughter, April, whom she had not seen for 17 years. Cano was known in court papers as Mary Doe when she won the right to an abortion in a ruling released the same day as the more famous Roe vs. Wade case. By then Cano had decided against the abortion and given the baby girl up for adoption.
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NEWS
December 10, 1989 | From Associated Press
Sandra Cano, one of the women whose Supreme Court cases established the right to abortion in 1973, was reunited Saturday with her first daughter, April, whom she had not seen for 17 years. Cano was known in court papers as Mary Doe when she won the right to an abortion in a ruling released the same day as the more famous Roe vs. Wade case. By then Cano had decided against the abortion and given the baby girl up for adoption.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1989 | MARIA NEWMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The daughter of a plaintiff in a landmark abortion rights case said Friday she has decided to join the campaign for a woman's right to abortion, a stance opposite that of her biological mother, an outspoken abortion foe. Melissa Able, 19, of Atlanta, said she will attend a massive pro-choice rally in Rancho Park on Sunday, her first foray into the loud and prolonged abortion rights fray.
OPINION
July 22, 1990 | Laurence H. Tribe, Laurence H. Tribe's most recent book is "Abortion: The Clash of Absolutes" (Norton), from which this is excerpted. He is the Tyler Professor of Constitutional Law at Harvard University
Most people are torn by the abortion question. There is something deeply misleading about discussing the abortion debate solely in terms of a clash between pro-life "groups" and pro-choice "groups," as though each of us could properly be labeled as belonging to one camp or the other. For nearly everyone, the deepest truth is that the clash is internal. Few people who really permit themselves to feel all of what is at stake in the abortion issue can avoid a profound sense of internal division.
NEWS
June 25, 1989 | DAVID TREADWELL, Times Staff Writer
They tell strikingly similar personal histories. Both say they were born to dirt-poor families in the South, both were high-school dropouts who were married as teen-agers to abusive men and, for much of their lives, both have led turbulent, Gypsy-like existences. Sixteen years ago, they both also were immortalized in American law in companion cases--the well-known Roe vs. Wade and the obscure but no less judicially important Doe vs. Bolton--which established a constitutional right for women to have abortions.
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