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Sandra Smoley

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1995 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the day Gov. Pete Wilson formally announced his candidacy for president, state Health and Welfare Secretary Sandra Smoley visited Orange County to tout Wilson's hard line on welfare fraud and trumpet the state's random investigations of a group of welfare recipients. "Welfare fraud represents a loss of at least $750 million each year to California taxpayers," Smoley said at a news conference.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1995 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the day Gov. Pete Wilson formally announced his candidacy for president, state Health and Welfare Secretary Sandra Smoley visited Orange County to tout Wilson's hard line on welfare fraud and trumpet the state's random investigations of a group of welfare recipients. "Welfare fraud represents a loss of at least $750 million each year to California taxpayers," Smoley said at a news conference.
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NEWS
November 24, 1992
Gov. Pete Wilson on Monday announced the appointment of Sandra Smoley, a Sacramento County supervisor who lost a race for the U.S. House in June, as his new secretary of the State and Consumer Services Agency. In her new post, which is subject to confirmation by the state Senate, she will oversee a vast bureaucracy that regulates everyone from physicians and bill collectors to embalmers. She will be paid $101,340 a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1994 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The head of the state's Health and Welfare Agency told Orange County doctors and nurses Wednesday that incremental, state-by-state health reform is "probably the way to go" now that sweeping national reform has foundered--and that California is leading the way with its pursuit of managed care. During a brief visit to Chapman General Hospital in Orange, Sandra R.
NEWS
October 3, 1993 | From a Times Staff Writer
Gov. Pete Wilson shifted a longtime political ally from one job in his Cabinet to another, making Sandra Smoley his new secretary for health and welfare. Smoley, a former Sacramento County supervisor, has been Wilson's secretary for state and consumer services for less than a year. As head of the Health and Welfare Agency, she will supervise 40,000 employees and manage a budget of more than $12 billion. A registered nurse, Smoley, 57, will replace Russell Gould.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1994 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The head of the state's Health and Welfare Agency told Orange County doctors and nurses Wednesday that incremental, state-by-state health reform is "probably the way to go" now that sweeping national reform has foundered--and that California is leading the way with its pursuit of managed care. During a brief visit to Chapman General Hospital in Orange, Sandra R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1995 | DEBRA CANO and JEFF BEAN and HOPE HAMASHIGE
Sandra Smoley, secretary of the California Health and Welfare Agency, will tour the Newport-Mesa Unified School District's health center in Costa Mesa today. The clinic at the Rea Community Center provides health screenings to kindergartners and first-graders enrolled at Newport-Mesa schools. The center, which is a year old, provides basic services, such as immunizations, hearing and vision tests, to underprivileged students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1995 | ANDREW D. BLECHMAN
Camarillo State Hospital is hosting its fifth annual art show beginning today with a special reception from noon to 5 p.m. The show will feature paintings, ceramics, sculpture, photography and video, all produced by patients. The public is invited to purchase some of the art, with proceeds going directly to the artists. The exhibit runs through Friday, when the hospital will celebrate with a tea party for the artists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1998 | STEVE CARNEY
California's first lady and the head of the state's Health and Welfare Agency will tour a school clinic today in Costa Mesa, where needy families can get help through the state's Healthy Start program. Gayle Wilson and HWA Secretary Sandra R. Smoley will visit the clinic at 601 Hamilton St., where students and their families can get tutoring, health screenings, dental and eye exams and immunizations under the program begun in 1991. The pair will speak at 11 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1997
Gov. Pete Wilson launched a statewide campaign Monday in South-Central Los Angeles aimedat reducing teen pregnancy by urging adults to get involved in children's lives as mentors. The Partnership for Responsible Parenting, a mentoring program that links children with responsible adults, is the nation's largest and most comprehensive effort aimed at reducing teen pregnancy, state officials said. Wilson was joined by Health and Welfare Secretary Sandra R.
NEWS
October 3, 1993 | From a Times Staff Writer
Gov. Pete Wilson shifted a longtime political ally from one job in his Cabinet to another, making Sandra Smoley his new secretary for health and welfare. Smoley, a former Sacramento County supervisor, has been Wilson's secretary for state and consumer services for less than a year. As head of the Health and Welfare Agency, she will supervise 40,000 employees and manage a budget of more than $12 billion. A registered nurse, Smoley, 57, will replace Russell Gould.
NEWS
November 24, 1992
Gov. Pete Wilson on Monday announced the appointment of Sandra Smoley, a Sacramento County supervisor who lost a race for the U.S. House in June, as his new secretary of the State and Consumer Services Agency. In her new post, which is subject to confirmation by the state Senate, she will oversee a vast bureaucracy that regulates everyone from physicians and bill collectors to embalmers. She will be paid $101,340 a year.
NEWS
May 17, 1997 | FRED ALVAREZ and VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Gov. Pete Wilson, responding to allegations that many of California's most severely retarded and disabled citizens are receiving substandard care in community homes, is ordering an independent examination of the placement of the developmentally disabled in such programs.
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