Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSandra Tsing Loh
IN THE NEWS

Sandra Tsing Loh

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2010 | By Irene Lacher, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Pasadena public radio personality-writer-monologuist-concert pianist-Caltech grad Sandra Tsing Loh can be heard every week in some 360 markets in the U.S. and abroad (via the Armed Forces Radio Network), wittily illuminating some interesting but hitherto obscure factoid in her minute-long show-ette, "The Loh Down on Science" ( lohdownonscience.com ). Now the versatile host, based at KPCC-FM (89.3), is developing an hourlong quiz and variety show designed to shed light on research by Caltech professors — and lend new meaning to the phrase "popular science."
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2014 | By Adam Tschorn
There was no shortage of chuckles, guffaws, sniggers, giggles and flat-out belly laughs at the Saturday afternoon panel discussion "Make Me Laugh! Humor Writing Across Genres" at the Festival of Books, which featured Mary Lou Belli, Sandra Tsing Loh and Michael Price, and was moderated by M.G. Lord. The panelists held forth for an hour (they and the audience seemed full well ready to clock a second hour), in front of an overflowing crowd, about the TV shows that helped shape their sense of humor ("F Troop," "MASH" and "Get Smart" among them)
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1990 | RAY LOYND
Performance art--a term that still confuses a lot of people--is best seen instead of talked about. Two splendid examples are Sandra Tsing Loh and Barry Yourgrau at Theatre/Theater. "Two Funny" is a pair of solo turns, Loh at a grand piano doing musical monologues on American movie musicals and Yourgrau--are you ready for this?--standing there reading to you from one of his short stories.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2010 | By Irene Lacher, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Pasadena public radio personality-writer-monologuist-concert pianist-Caltech grad Sandra Tsing Loh can be heard every week in some 360 markets in the U.S. and abroad (via the Armed Forces Radio Network), wittily illuminating some interesting but hitherto obscure factoid in her minute-long show-ette, "The Loh Down on Science" ( lohdownonscience.com ). Now the versatile host, based at KPCC-FM (89.3), is developing an hourlong quiz and variety show designed to shed light on research by Caltech professors — and lend new meaning to the phrase "popular science."
MAGAZINE
May 7, 2000
Thank you for the great article and lovely cover picture of Sandra Tsing Loh ("The Multi-Cult Semi-Celeb," by John M. Glionna, photograph by Rachel Weill, April 9). I have been a fan of Loh's since I first heard her intelligent, offbeat humor on Peter Tilden's radio show when she guested several years ago. She did an impromptu commentary on "Friends" that was hilarious. Last year I enjoyed seeing her as a panelist at the L.A. Times Book Festival, where she held her own with such heavyweights as Steve Allen and Arianna Huffington.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1998 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After an off-Broadway run in New York in May, Sandra Tsing Loh has brought an L.A. version of "Bad Sex With Bud Kemp" to the Tiffany Theater in West Hollywood, where the show began a six-week run Monday night. Through her witty radio commentaries ("The Loh Life," heard on KCRW-FM 89.9) and books (the essay collection "Depth Takes a Holiday" and last year's novel, "If You Lived Here, You'd Be Home by Now"), Loh has become one of L.A.'
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2008 | Susan Carpenter, Times Staff Writer
Selecting schools in L.A. is the seventh circle of hell. The process is so unnervingly difficult that even the most Zen of parents can be worked into frightened paranoiacs, usually around the time their kids are learning to put on their own underwear. Should they send their spawn to private school or public? Pay the exorbitant tuition that will sequester them amongst the children of the monied and educated or pay nothing and throw them to the wolves with the kids of the working class?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2004 | Greg Braxton, Times Staff Writer
Forget the NCAA tournament. Sandra Tsing Loh has gone through true March Madness. In the last three weeks, Loh has weathered a family crisis, emergency rooms and sick children, the heartbreak of being fired from her gig as a commentator for KCRW-FM (89.9), the sweet revenge of being offered that job back -- and turning it down. She said hello to notoriety and goodbye to her status as a "painfully obscure $150-a-week semi-retired performance artist."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1997 | REBECCA ANDRADE
Although writer Sandra Tsing Loh was born in Newport Beach and raised in Malibu, she spent summers in Egypt, Brazil and other places she remembers as more stressful than exotic. Accounts of brushes with terrorists are typical of her tales of travels with her eccentric family. But it's the San Fernando Valley that captures Loh's imagination. For four years, the 35-year-old Van Nuys resident wrote a regular column about the Valley for trendy Buzz magazine.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1990 | KIKU LANI IWATA
Classically trained pianist Sandra Tsing Loh wants to be taken as a serious musician even though her Open Festival event Saturday, "Music at the Bonus Carwash," may do little to dispel her reputation for staging amusing avant-garde musical performances.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2009
James Rainey has been charmingly gentle in reprimanding Sandra Tsing Loh for her harangue against marriage ["Loh Has Left Him Feeling Jilted," June 17]. Perhaps if Loh wants to avoid the moralistic scorn she expects, she might avoid writing about her infidelity in a national magazine, but I suspect she will wear her scarlet letter as a fashionable accessory while profiting from writing about her unhappiness. Nothing sells, apparently even in the Atlantic, like complaining. David Eggenschwiler Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2009 | JAMES RAINEY
For years, I've enjoyed Sandra Tsing Loh's public radio riffs and her witty-pithy (she might call them "withy") essays on the struggles of juggling work, kids and marriage. She could be that smart friend who had you snorting with laughter on the commute home, exposing the absurdities of modern life. It was a seamless blending of art and life, animated with an unflagging honesty.
OPINION
December 22, 2008
Re "Go with a pit bull PTA mom," Opinion, Dec. 16 I was stunned to read that the Los Angeles Unified School District turns down children's books because of an $18-a-book cataloging fee. My son's Mac laptop has a computer program that reads the bar code printed on a book with the tiny camera in the laptop screen. The title and description of the book are recorded. For the price of well under 100 book-cataloging fees, the district could buy a laptop and the program. I agree with Sandra Tsing Loh that the charlatan who is reportedly being paid in excess of $119,000 a year should be fired.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2008
SUSAN CARPENTER, in her witty and perceptive review of Sandra Tsing Loh's new book "Mother on Fire" ["One Mom's Gleeful Rant," Aug. 22], did an excellent job of capturing Tsing Loh's consistently amusing (but seriously concerned) tone when navigating the grotesque horrors of the Los Angeles Unified School District's labyrinthine "system." Barry Smolin Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2008 | Susan Carpenter, Times Staff Writer
Selecting schools in L.A. is the seventh circle of hell. The process is so unnervingly difficult that even the most Zen of parents can be worked into frightened paranoiacs, usually around the time their kids are learning to put on their own underwear. Should they send their spawn to private school or public? Pay the exorbitant tuition that will sequester them amongst the children of the monied and educated or pay nothing and throw them to the wolves with the kids of the working class?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2008 | Scott Timberg
Playwright and poet Brighde Mullins will become director of the University of Southern California Master of Professional Writing program, starting July 1. The organizer of reading series at REDCAT, LACMA and New York's Dia Art Foundation, Mullins directs a writing program at the California Institute of the Arts. Her plays include "Fire Eater," performed at Venice's Electric Lodge in 2004. The faculty for the USC program includes writers Janet Fitch, Judith Freeman and Sandra Tsing Loh. -- Scott Timberg
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1997 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Sandra Tsing Loh was a temp at a Van Nuys insurance office, the women were required to wear pantyhose--even if they were wearing pants. Alec Mapa's temp travails included a stint at a Century City office where he shredded documents--and cried--all day. And this was after he starred in "M. Butterfly" at the Wilshire Theatre and on Broadway. Loh and Mapa can swap temp-job horror stories with the best of them. Both are in their 30s, so they share a generational perspective.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2004
With Ruth Seymour's firing of Sandra Tsing Loh at KCRW-FM and now Bob Edwards' demotion at NPR's "Morning Edition" ("Stormy Days for NPR," by Allan M. Jalon and Steve Carney, March 29), it appears that public radio is running out of feet to shoot. Lon M. Burns Manhattan Beach
OPINION
May 5, 2007
Re "A drill can't fix LAUSD," Opinion, April 28 The rest of the world scores quick and easy political points by bashing our public school system. Virtually alone in the world of punditry, Sandra Tsing Loh identifies the successes of public schools. As a parent with children in public school, I love her work on this front, because school staff are properly more concerned with teaching than with rehabilitating their battered image. For readers who merely skim headlines, "A drill can't fix LAUSD" cynically echoes the conventional wisdom that our school system is broken beyond repair.
OPINION
January 1, 2006
* To forget the Pulitzers. The Times has been putting energy into prize-winning features that run once a year. Readers care more about the quality of day-in, day-out coverage. (Mickey Kaus) * To print a piece about Los Angeles public schools that isn't either so boring or so terrifying that educated, middle-class parents might actually dare to send their kids there.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|