Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSandstone Peak
IN THE NEWS

Sandstone Peak

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1998 | KATE FOLMAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 3,111 feet, the men sprawl across the craggy peak, sunning themselves like lizards on rocks. After six miles of hiking rough trail amid the brown-sugar-curry scent of the California everlast plant, this Sierra Club group has reached the highest point in the Santa Monicas--Sandstone Peak. To the southwest stretches the endless Pacific, the tip of Santa Cruz Island hovering over the ocean mist.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
December 5, 2011 | By Charles Fleming, Los Angeles Times
Nobody walks in L.A.? Ridiculous! This is one in a series of articles exploring the many opportunities for walking in (and around) a major city. SANDSTONE PEAK, MALIBU Distance: 3.5-6 miles Duration: 3-4 hours Difficulty: 3/4 Transportation: Free parking available. Dogs on leash. No bicycles. This is a long, lovely walk in the Malibu hills over a dramatic variety of terrain, with spectacular views of the Santa Monica Mountains, San Fernando Valley and Pacific Ocean.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 21, 1990 | JOHN McKINNEY, McKinney is an outdoors writer in Southern California
When I was 11, Sandstone Peak in the Santa Monica Mountains seemed the highest point in the world. Eagles soared, mountain lions lurked and Chumash Indian spirits dwelt there. The remote and regal peak often was enshrouded in fog that activated a tenderfoot Scout's imagination. To the Boy Scouts of Troop 441, Sandstone Peak with its miles of chaparral, poison oak and boulders was an awesome ascent from Circle X Scout Ranch. Most awesome of all was the view from the top.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1998 | KATE FOLMAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 3,111 feet, the men sprawl across the craggy peak, sunning themselves like lizards on rocks. After six miles of hiking rough trail amid the brown-sugar-curry scent of the California everlast plant, this Sierra Club group has reached the highest point in the Santa Monicas--Sandstone Peak. To the southwest stretches the endless Pacific, the tip of Santa Cruz Island hovering over the ocean mist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1998 | KATE FOLMAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 3,111 feet, the men sprawl across the craggy peak, sunning themselves like lizards on rocks. After six miles of hiking rough trail amid the brown-sugar-curry scent of the California everlast plant, this Sierra Club group has reached the highest point in the Santa Monicas--Sandstone Peak. To the southwest stretches the endless Pacific, the tip of Santa Cruz Island hovering over the ocean mist.
NEWS
June 11, 1998 | STEVE HYMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 100 years ago, John Muir wrote: "Go where you may within the bounds of California, mountains are ever in sight, charming and glorifying every landscape." Muir, of course, rarely met a mountain he didn't climb. Even today--despite all the attractions and distractions of the modern world--people set out every day to climb those mountains. People seemingly will always have an interest in seeing what's on top. Four of the peaks listed below are good day hikes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1987 | STEVE CHAWKINS, Times Staff Writer
The Boy Scouts' Circle X Ranch in a rugged stretch of the Santa Monica Mountains officially became a public park at the end of February, but the ghosts of outings past linger. Over four decades, countless callow tenderfeet have been sent on futile snipe hunts deep in the ranch's canyons. Thousands of Scouts have studied the constellations rising over the ranch's 3,111-foot Sandstone Peak, the highest mountain in the Santa Monica chain.
HEALTH
December 5, 2011 | By Charles Fleming, Los Angeles Times
Nobody walks in L.A.? Ridiculous! This is one in a series of articles exploring the many opportunities for walking in (and around) a major city. SANDSTONE PEAK, MALIBU Distance: 3.5-6 miles Duration: 3-4 hours Difficulty: 3/4 Transportation: Free parking available. Dogs on leash. No bicycles. This is a long, lovely walk in the Malibu hills over a dramatic variety of terrain, with spectacular views of the Santa Monica Mountains, San Fernando Valley and Pacific Ocean.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1989
In a ceremony punctuated by bagpipe music and blue skies, a state parks agency turned over 2,434 acres in the Santa Monica Mountains to the National Park Service Monday. The cornerstone of the $11-million land sale by the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy was the site of the ceremony, the 1,655-acre Circle X Ranch in southeast Ventura County, which includes Sandstone Peak, the highest point in the Santa Monicas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1994 | KURT PITZER
Spring birds and blossoms have brought abundant reasons to escape the urban grid, if only for a few hours, into the Santa Monica Mountains for hikes and seminars coordinated by the National Park Service. Dozens of free nature walks, birding expeditions and other events are offered in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area between April 1 and June 30, in the National Park Service's most activity-packed calendar ever.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1998 | KATE FOLMAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 3,111 feet, the men sprawl across the craggy peak, sunning themselves like lizards on rocks. After six miles of hiking rough trail amid the brown-sugar-curry scent of the California everlast plant, this Sierra Club group has reached the highest point in the Santa Monicas--Sandstone Peak. To the southwest stretches the endless Pacific, the tip of Santa Cruz Island hovering over the ocean mist.
NEWS
June 11, 1998 | STEVE HYMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 100 years ago, John Muir wrote: "Go where you may within the bounds of California, mountains are ever in sight, charming and glorifying every landscape." Muir, of course, rarely met a mountain he didn't climb. Even today--despite all the attractions and distractions of the modern world--people set out every day to climb those mountains. People seemingly will always have an interest in seeing what's on top. Four of the peaks listed below are good day hikes.
NEWS
April 21, 1990 | JOHN McKINNEY, McKinney is an outdoors writer in Southern California
When I was 11, Sandstone Peak in the Santa Monica Mountains seemed the highest point in the world. Eagles soared, mountain lions lurked and Chumash Indian spirits dwelt there. The remote and regal peak often was enshrouded in fog that activated a tenderfoot Scout's imagination. To the Boy Scouts of Troop 441, Sandstone Peak with its miles of chaparral, poison oak and boulders was an awesome ascent from Circle X Scout Ranch. Most awesome of all was the view from the top.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1987 | STEVE CHAWKINS, Times Staff Writer
The Boy Scouts' Circle X Ranch in a rugged stretch of the Santa Monica Mountains officially became a public park at the end of February, but the ghosts of outings past linger. Over four decades, countless callow tenderfeet have been sent on futile snipe hunts deep in the ranch's canyons. Thousands of Scouts have studied the constellations rising over the ranch's 3,111-foot Sandstone Peak, the highest mountain in the Santa Monica chain.
NEWS
February 10, 1994 | JANE HULSE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sandstone Peak is the highest point in the Santa Monica Mountains. If you want to see the view from the top, join a hike Saturday led by a National Park Service ranger. Actually, the hike isn't a straight shot to the top of the 3,111-foot peak, but rather about a six-mile circuitous route that also takes walkers into the canyons and wide-open spaces of Circle X Ranch. The ranch is off Yerba Buena Road near the coastal border of Ventura and Los Angeles counties.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1998 | ROBIN RAUZI
While we'd all like to think that our New Year's resolutions are intensely personal, let's face it, all resolutions fall into two categories: more and less. Eat less. Exercise more. Watch TV less. Read more. And so on. The optimist would call this itinerary getting off to a great start. The cynic would suggest that no resolution will last, even until Sunday. (The latter should, perhaps, resolve to be more optimistic.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|