Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSandwich Generation
IN THE NEWS

Sandwich Generation

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1989 | MARCIDA DODSON, Times Staff Writer
They call it the "sandwich generation." That may sound like baloney and the makings of even more puns. But for those of us who have joined the ranks, it is no joke. The term refers to adults who are caring for not only their own children, but their aging parents as well. Squeezed in the middle, they are raising children while juggling the emotional, financial and logistical problems of playing parent to their own parents. Caring for the elderly is nothing new, but this "middle generation squeeze" is bound to become a growing issue, according to Sharon Hamill, a doctoral student at UC Irvine who is studying multigeneration families.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
February 6, 2012 | Melissa Healy
David Solie thought he was being a good son and a competent manager. But his strong-willed mother was having none of it. Carol Solie, 72, had been caring for herself, her 28-year-old son, Roger, who has Down syndrome, and the family home in Portland, Ore., since her husband died in 1989. From David Solie's vantage point in Calabasas, it was too much. So once a month, he would travel nearly 1,000 miles north to set things right. This son decreed that his mother should move someplace easier to navigate -- an assisted living complex, perhaps.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 29, 1996 | IDELLE DAVIDSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sue (a pseudonym) partially blames her sister and brother for her panic attacks. The stress of caring for her frail 88-year-old mother creates the anxiety, but Sue believes her siblings aggravate it by their unwillingness to help. Her sister and brother live out of state and claim hardship or that their lives are too busy when she asks for financial or emotional support. Although Sue's brother came into town for 10 days last December, he visited his mother only once.
IMAGE
September 25, 2011 | By Alene Dawson, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Much has been made this year about the behemoth baby boom generation reaching retirement age. But another significant milestone is slipping past a bit more quietly yet with noticeable impact. The first wave of Gen-Xers has rounded 40, and they are changing the face of what it means to be middle-aged. Women of this generation - think Jennifer Lopez, Jennifer Aniston, Gwyneth Paltrow, Salma Hayek, Angelina Jolie - are pushing waifish teens off magazine covers, starring in movies, inspiring cosmetics and fragrances, wearing bikinis at the beach and minis to the mall.
HEALTH
February 6, 2012 | Melissa Healy
David Solie thought he was being a good son and a competent manager. But his strong-willed mother was having none of it. Carol Solie, 72, had been caring for herself, her 28-year-old son, Roger, who has Down syndrome, and the family home in Portland, Ore., since her husband died in 1989. From David Solie's vantage point in Calabasas, it was too much. So once a month, he would travel nearly 1,000 miles north to set things right. This son decreed that his mother should move someplace easier to navigate -- an assisted living complex, perhaps.
NEWS
December 26, 1987
Are you a member of the sandwich generation, the group we featured a couple of weeks ago in Family Life? A Mission Viejo therapist is offering a workshop for women who are caught between aging parents and growing children. "I have been focusing on these issues in my practice and in my own life for the past few years," said Vivian Clecak, a licensed clinical social worker and marriage, family and child counselor. "My mother is 74 and my older daughter 13 1/2.
IMAGE
September 25, 2011 | By Alene Dawson, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Much has been made this year about the behemoth baby boom generation reaching retirement age. But another significant milestone is slipping past a bit more quietly yet with noticeable impact. The first wave of Gen-Xers has rounded 40, and they are changing the face of what it means to be middle-aged. Women of this generation - think Jennifer Lopez, Jennifer Aniston, Gwyneth Paltrow, Salma Hayek, Angelina Jolie - are pushing waifish teens off magazine covers, starring in movies, inspiring cosmetics and fragrances, wearing bikinis at the beach and minis to the mall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1997 | DANA PARSONS
My mother is always worried about anything happening to her four precious, darling children. "Who'd take care of me?" she says. We know she's kidding--we think she's kidding--but I'm not sure that any of us have asked her if she's being serious. Could it be that dear old mom, whom we never think of as old, harbors many of the same fears as many other people now in their 70s and 80s? Namely, who will take care of me if I can't take care of myself in my old age?
NEWS
December 12, 1987 | JAN HOFMANN, For The Times
Joan was "almost out of the woods," as she puts it. Her two children were teen-agers, old enough that she and her husband could leave the house for a trip to the store--or even a weekend away--without hiring a baby sitter or bringing the family along. Then she went back East for Christmas, saw the condition her mother was in and suddenly realized that she was facing a whole new set of parenting responsibilities. "I had just seen her the year before," Joan said.
REAL ESTATE
August 12, 1990 | BETH KENNEDY, Kennedy lives in Los Angeles with her husband, son and mother-in-law. and
I've never paid much attention to categories, labels and other classifications. But lately the term "sandwich generation" has been gaining attention, and several years ago I recognized myself as a member of this newly labeled sociological group. I'm a wife, mother of a 6-year-old son and daughter-in-law of a lovely senior citizen who needs our care and attention. Suddenly, my role as care giver sandwiched between two generations demanded a solution.
NEWS
November 19, 2001 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After all the hype about fuel cells, there it is, a "revolutionary" invention to ease the energy shortage and spare the environment, and it looks about as sophisticated as a waffle iron. On a counter in a USC chemistry lab rests a black metal sandwich with a thin tube connecting it to a vial of wood alcohol. Squeezed between the steel plates are a few drops of the alcohol, a plastic wafer and some platinum-coated mesh.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1997 | DANA PARSONS
My mother is always worried about anything happening to her four precious, darling children. "Who'd take care of me?" she says. We know she's kidding--we think she's kidding--but I'm not sure that any of us have asked her if she's being serious. Could it be that dear old mom, whom we never think of as old, harbors many of the same fears as many other people now in their 70s and 80s? Namely, who will take care of me if I can't take care of myself in my old age?
NEWS
September 29, 1996 | IDELLE DAVIDSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sue (a pseudonym) partially blames her sister and brother for her panic attacks. The stress of caring for her frail 88-year-old mother creates the anxiety, but Sue believes her siblings aggravate it by their unwillingness to help. Her sister and brother live out of state and claim hardship or that their lives are too busy when she asks for financial or emotional support. Although Sue's brother came into town for 10 days last December, he visited his mother only once.
NEWS
May 20, 1996 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On top of holding down a challenging management job at Southern California Edison Co. and raising a son in grade school, Enid Joffe took on another demanding responsibility slightly more than a year ago: arranging round-the-clock care for her elderly, faltering mother. It wasn't easy. To begin with, Joffe's 87-year-old mother, who suffers from Alzheimer's disease, was living a continent away, back in Brooklyn.
REAL ESTATE
August 12, 1990 | BETH KENNEDY, Kennedy lives in Los Angeles with her husband, son and mother-in-law. and
I've never paid much attention to categories, labels and other classifications. But lately the term "sandwich generation" has been gaining attention, and several years ago I recognized myself as a member of this newly labeled sociological group. I'm a wife, mother of a 6-year-old son and daughter-in-law of a lovely senior citizen who needs our care and attention. Suddenly, my role as care giver sandwiched between two generations demanded a solution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1989 | MARCIDA DODSON, Times Staff Writer
They call it the "sandwich generation." That may sound like baloney and the makings of even more puns. But for those of us who have joined the ranks, it is no joke. The term refers to adults who are caring for not only their own children, but their aging parents as well. Squeezed in the middle, they are raising children while juggling the emotional, financial and logistical problems of playing parent to their own parents. Caring for the elderly is nothing new, but this "middle generation squeeze" is bound to become a growing issue, according to Sharon Hamill, a doctoral student at UC Irvine who is studying multigeneration families.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1986 | Marcida Dodson
Help for the "sandwich generation"--adults who are both raising children and caring for aging parents--will be provided in a four-week program presented by Humana Hospital-Westminster in October. "The Sandwich Generation: A Support Program for Adult Children of Elderly Parents" will feature a variety of speakers, including physicians, long-term care representatives and senior center representatives.
NEWS
November 19, 2001 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After all the hype about fuel cells, there it is, a "revolutionary" invention to ease the energy shortage and spare the environment, and it looks about as sophisticated as a waffle iron. On a counter in a USC chemistry lab rests a black metal sandwich with a thin tube connecting it to a vial of wood alcohol. Squeezed between the steel plates are a few drops of the alcohol, a plastic wafer and some platinum-coated mesh.
NEWS
December 26, 1987
Are you a member of the sandwich generation, the group we featured a couple of weeks ago in Family Life? A Mission Viejo therapist is offering a workshop for women who are caught between aging parents and growing children. "I have been focusing on these issues in my practice and in my own life for the past few years," said Vivian Clecak, a licensed clinical social worker and marriage, family and child counselor. "My mother is 74 and my older daughter 13 1/2.
NEWS
December 12, 1987 | JAN HOFMANN, For The Times
Joan was "almost out of the woods," as she puts it. Her two children were teen-agers, old enough that she and her husband could leave the house for a trip to the store--or even a weekend away--without hiring a baby sitter or bringing the family along. Then she went back East for Christmas, saw the condition her mother was in and suddenly realized that she was facing a whole new set of parenting responsibilities. "I had just seen her the year before," Joan said.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|