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Sandy Alomar

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March 19, 1991 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sandy Alomar could hear the crowd noise. He watched the long line of cars pulling in and out of HoHoKam Park. He even imagined Harry Caray singing during the seventh-inning stretch. But instead of standing in the Padres' third-base coaches' box Monday against the Chicago Cubs, Alomar was standing in a patch of dirt by a chain-link fence three blocks away, hitting fungoes to 18-year-old kids dressed in Cub uniforms. "It's just nice to be around somewhere," Alomar said, almost in a whisper.
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SPORTS
October 9, 2012 | Staff and wire reports
Dodgers catcher A.J. Ellis underwent a minor knee operation last week, the team announced Monday. Ellis underwent a 30-minute procedure on Friday to trim the medial and lateral meniscus in his left knee, which were torn. He will begin physical therapy next week and is expected to be able to start his normal off-season training program in six weeks. He should be fully competitive at the start of spring training, according to the team. Soreness in the knee resulted in Ellis' missing two games in July and undergoing an MRI exam.
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SPORTS
March 17, 1986 | STEVE DOLAN, Times Staff Writer
With arms folded across his chest, Sandy Alomar listened intently as Garry Templeton walked and talked as he led off second base. Templeton was discussing techniques for getting jumps. Alomar, the Padres' baserunning and first base coach, stepped in briefly and walked like a wounded duck when taking a lead. "You don't want to look like this," Alomar said. "Otherwise, you'll be a dead duck." Everybody laughed, but Alomar's pun made its point.
NEWS
October 5, 2012 |  
While the Boston Red Sox begin the search for a new manager in the wake of the firing of Bobby Valentine, one of their old managers, Terry Francona, is trying to find a manager's job of his own. Francona, who managed the Boston Red Sox to World Series titles in 2004 and 2007, arrived in Cleveland on Friday morning to begin a daylong interview to become the new manager of the Indians. Francona, who parted ways with the Red Sox before the 2012 season and was replaced by Valentine, was a TV analyst last season.
SPORTS
February 26, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Sandy Alomar, the American League rookie of the year in 1990, agreed to a one-year contract worth $345,000 with the Cleveland Indians.
SPORTS
September 21, 1992 | Associated Press
Cleveland Indian catcher Sandy Alomar will undergo arthroscopic surgery on a cartilage tear in his left knee Tuesday and miss the remainder of the season. Alomar hurt the knee while sliding into third base Aug. 16 against Toronto. He will play in the instructional league program and for Ponce in the Puerto Rican Winter League.
NEWS
October 5, 2012 |  
While the Boston Red Sox begin the search for a new manager in the wake of the firing of Bobby Valentine, one of their old managers, Terry Francona, is trying to find a manager's job of his own. Francona, who managed the Boston Red Sox to World Series titles in 2004 and 2007, arrived in Cleveland on Friday morning to begin a daylong interview to become the new manager of the Indians. Francona, who parted ways with the Red Sox before the 2012 season and was replaced by Valentine, was a TV analyst last season.
SPORTS
July 24, 2006 | Steve Henson, Times Staff Writer
Those clamoring for Ned Colletti to shake the Dodgers out of their doldrums with a blockbuster deal can only hope the trade he made Sunday is an appetizer before the main course. Shipping third-string catcher Sandy Alomar Jr. to the Chicago White Sox for minor league pitcher B.J. LaMura won't have a major effect.
SPORTS
August 17, 1990 | KIM Q. BERKSHIRE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maybe if it didn't happen so fast and hadn't come so easily. One of the biggest problems with success is not knowing failure, and Roberto Alomar has experienced lots of the former, little of the latter. "Things have come to him too easy," said Sandy Alomar, Padre third base coach and Roberto's father. "Who else can say better than me, because I raised him? He hasn't experienced failure." Certainly not Thursday afternoon at San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium against Montreal.
SPORTS
July 24, 2006 | Steve Henson, Times Staff Writer
Those clamoring for Ned Colletti to shake the Dodgers out of their doldrums with a blockbuster deal can only hope the trade he made Sunday is an appetizer before the main course. Shipping third-string catcher Sandy Alomar Jr. to the Chicago White Sox for minor league pitcher B.J. LaMura won't have a major effect.
SPORTS
December 19, 2000 | JERRY CROWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two catchers whom the Dodgers considered pursuing landed elsewhere Monday. Former Dodger Charles Johnson, who ended last season with the Chicago White Sox, signed a five-year, $35-million contract with the Florida Marlins. And Sandy Alomar Jr., formerly of the Cleveland Indians, agreed to a two-year, $5.4-million deal with the White Sox, replacing Johnson. The Dodgers apparently were unwilling to pay the high price for Johnson. Sources said they offered Alomar a one-year deal.
SPORTS
December 12, 2000 | JASON REID, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Accomplishing their top off-season goal, the Dodgers agreed to terms Monday with free-agent pitcher Darren Dreifort and now will try to acquire a veteran catcher and left-handed reliever. General Manager Kevin Malone had discussions with other teams and agents about players to bolster the 25-man roster after drawing up Dreifort's five-year, $55-million contract at the winter meetings here.
SPORTS
October 6, 1999 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the television camera zooms in on Roberto Alomar in the Cleveland Indian dugout, it rarely catches the star second baseman laughing, smiling or joking. Alomar is almost always sitting straight up, alert, his head still and eyes wide open, wearing a look that is intense yet serene, like that of a predator about to pounce on easy prey. "He's like an alligator," Indian shortstop Omar Vizquel said. "He's a real quiet guy who doesn't say much. He just sits there and watches everything.
SPORTS
October 26, 1997 | THOMAS BOSWELL, WASHINGTON POST
Back in ancient times, Babe Ruth or Joe DiMaggio probably had an October when no fan in America could believe, day after day, the things he'd already done and, against all odds, kept right on doing. What Sandy Alomar is achieving can't be unique. Then again, maybe it is. In the age of legends, when all the home runs landed on rooftops, the limit of baseball possibility was one pennant race and a World Series. Even heroes need opportunities to spread themselves.
SPORTS
March 18, 1986 | STEVE DOLAN, Times Staff Writer
With arms folded across his chest, Sandy Alomar listened intently as Garry Templeton walked and talked while leading off second base. Templeton was discussing techniques for getting jumps. Alomar, the Padres' baserunning and first base coach, stepped in briefly and walked like a wounded duck while taking his lead. "You don't want to look like this," Alomar said. "Otherwise, you'll be a dead duck." Everybody laughed, but Alomar's pun made its point.
SPORTS
October 8, 1997 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Baltimore Oriole second baseman Roberto Alomar is an eight-time all-star with two World Series rings, but who knows how things would have turned out had his older brother not whacked him in the head with a baseball bat about 20 years ago?
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