Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSandy Bailey
IN THE NEWS

Sandy Bailey

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
June 28, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Sandy Bailey, deputy sports editor of the New York Times, became president of the Associated Press Sports Editors at the group's national convention in San Francisco and became the first female president of the organization in its 19-year existence.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
June 28, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Sandy Bailey, deputy sports editor of the New York Times, became president of the Associated Press Sports Editors at the group's national convention in San Francisco and became the first female president of the organization in its 19-year existence.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1992 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday unanimously rejected a Sacramento broadcaster's plan to erect five transmission towers in Big Tujunga Wash to serve a proposed San Fernando Valley-based "talk-news" radio station. Leading the fight against the project was Councilman Joel Wachs, who was backed by a solid lineup of northeast Valley homeowner leaders who complained that the 164-foot towers would ruin the ambience of the wash.
NEWS
March 11, 1999 | BOOTH MOORE
Women are making a name for themselves in sports, and it's about time they had a magazine of their own to show for it. Sports Illustrated for Women hits newsstands today, the first of four issues scheduled for publication this year. The magazine, published by Time Inc., has been in the planning stages for several years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2004 | Lance Pugmire, Times Staff Writer
Five years after a Korean War veteran disappeared from his Mt. Baldy cabin, a San Bernardino County jury on Tuesday convicted a woman accused of murdering the man for his money, then dismembering him with a chain saw and scattering the remains.
SPORTS
April 22, 1997 | RANDY HARVEY
I don't know anyone at USC who wasn't pleased when pitcher Randy Flores broke the school record for victories, which he did Friday when he won his 41st game. By all accounts, he's an exceptional person as well as an exceptional college pitcher--a minister's son from Pico Rivera who operates a charity baseball clinic out of his father's church, a smart left-hander drafted by St.
SPORTS
June 5, 1988 | TONY KORNHEISER, The Washington Post
Chicago's White Sox, team of puny averages, doormat to the American League, are said to be ready to bolt the Windy City and relocate in St. Petersburg, the Retin-A capital of the world. I guess they'll rename the team the Support Hose. Will they start their games at 4:30 p.m. and give $2 off on the early-bird? Don't get me wrong, I love St. Pete. I love driving around, observing the 5 miles per hour speed limit. I love shuffleboard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2003 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
A woman accused of fatally shooting a 71-year-old Korean War veteran at his mountain cabin, then chopping off his head and rolling it down Mt. Baldy, was ordered to stand trial for murder Wednesday by a San Bernardino County judge. Marcia Ann Johnson, 42, told a detective that she shot the man and severed his head, hands and feet with a chainsaw because he repeatedly exposed himself to her, according to testimony. Authorities allege that the slaying was part of a scheme to steal his money.
SPORTS
September 6, 2000 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The transportation system was a mess. The computers churned out inaccurate results. Commercialism was overwhelming. A bomb explosion killed a woman and injured 110 people. From a logistical and artistic perspective, the 1996 Atlanta Olympics were a nightmare in many ways. But for female athletes in team sports, the Games were the realization of a dream. While the U.S. men's basketball team was criticized for its arrogance and lack of interest while routing opponents, the U.S.
NEWS
August 14, 1996 | KATHLEEN O. RYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Prostate cancer. Breast cancer. Two gender-specific diseases with distinctive similarities. Deadly when left untreated, both claim similar numbers of lives--at least 40,000 people in the United States will die from each disease this year--and both strike a very intimate side of self-image. The outcome of most breast and prostate cancer surgeries is good. Yet, in the process, sexual self-esteem is often jeopardized. A man cannot comprehend losing the external badge of femininity.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|