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Sandy Dijkstra

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NEWS
November 8, 1999 | SUSAN CARPENTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sandra Dijkstra, founder of the Sandra Dijkstra Literary Agency in Del Mar, may be the West Coast's most powerful literary agent. She has propelled unknown authors to the top of bestseller lists, and transformed Amy Tan and Susan Faludi into household names. As testimony to that clout, her office is aflutter with papers--publishing contracts, file folders and notes of things to be done. Books line the walls as do multitudinous works of art. Stacks of manuscripts lie on the floor.
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NEWS
November 8, 1999 | SUSAN CARPENTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sandra Dijkstra, founder of the Sandra Dijkstra Literary Agency in Del Mar, may be the West Coast's most powerful literary agent. She has propelled unknown authors to the top of bestseller lists, and transformed Amy Tan and Susan Faludi into household names. As testimony to that clout, her office is aflutter with papers--publishing contracts, file folders and notes of things to be done. Books line the walls as do multitudinous works of art. Stacks of manuscripts lie on the floor.
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NEWS
November 24, 1996 | IRENE LACHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It works like a normal kitchen--the refrigerator and dishwasher are where they ought to be. But Bram and Sandy Dijkstra also have a few extras--a solid wall of oil paintings above the stove. "It's the result of our needs as collectors to find places to put things," says Bram, 58, heating up coffee in an actual pan in their rebelliously microwave-free zone. "One thing we did was put a huge suction thing on the stove that zaps everything out, and we turn it on when we cook."
NEWS
November 24, 1996 | IRENE LACHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It works like a normal kitchen--the refrigerator and dishwasher are where they ought to be. But Bram and Sandy Dijkstra also have a few extras--a solid wall of oil paintings above the stove. "It's the result of our needs as collectors to find places to put things," says Bram, 58, heating up coffee in an actual pan in their rebelliously microwave-free zone. "One thing we did was put a huge suction thing on the stove that zaps everything out, and we turn it on when we cook."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2006 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
Is the publishing world the new "Prada"? That's the feeling readers might get from two new novels by Debra Ginsberg and Bridie Clark, which might remind them -- at least superficially -- of the high-end fashion scene depicted in "The Devil Wears Prada." In all three, an ambitious young woman goes to work for a cruel, over-the-top female boss, only to survive in the end with her dignity intact.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2003 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
When Julie Shigekuni, author of the upcoming "Invisible Gardens," was interviewing to teach a first-time course in Asian American literature at the University of New Mexico near her home, she says this is how she was asked about the insights she would bring to the class: "Amy Tan has already written the Asian American experience. Why should we hire you?"
NEWS
January 3, 1994 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stories where love truly triumphs . . . family sagas that actually make you want to read to the end . . . spiritual odysseys that are more than lite literature . . . fiction that grapples with tough and tender issues, like how three women rally around a fourth who is dying of breast cancer . . . a search, via the printed page, for a place called home. Readers, take heart.
NEWS
November 20, 1997 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Munch Mancini is at a Venice bar. This is her day--the day she gives up dope and drinking and changes everything. A guy sits down next to her and starts to talk. She's instinctively assessing him because she's a hooker. But then she thinks: 'Not today. Today I'm changing and I would not do it for any price.'
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2007 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
Thirty years ago, Charlie Winton, a longhaired, recently graduated Stanford film major, co-founded the book distributor Publishers Group West with less than $2,000.
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