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Sandy Gray

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BUSINESS
April 1, 1998 | KAREN E. KLEIN, Karen E. Kline is a freelance writer
Sandy Gray was only 26 when he took over a company that had lost $4.2 million in the previous three years. Its bills were 90 days past due, and its second-largest customer had just gone bankrupt and announced it would not pay the $300,000 it owed. Instead of running in the other direction, Gray accepted an offer to overhaul the maker of wood products for windows. Within three months, he had achieved a positive net income for the first time in three years.
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BUSINESS
April 1, 1998 | KAREN E. KLEIN, Karen E. Kline is a freelance writer
Sandy Gray was only 26 when he took over a company that had lost $4.2 million in the previous three years. Its bills were 90 days past due, and its second-largest customer had just gone bankrupt and announced it would not pay the $300,000 it owed. Instead of running in the other direction, Gray accepted an offer to overhaul the maker of wood products for windows. Within three months, he had achieved a positive net income for the first time in three years.
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MAGAZINE
June 10, 2007
Thanks to George Haas for alerting us to the fate of some nonnative trees in the L.A. Basin ("Here Today. Gone Tomorrow?" May 13). We live in a world where we frequently hear news of city planners approving the removal of some well-established trees in the name of progress. These stories are often followed by the latest report on global warming. When are we going to get it that the first step toward warding off warming and increasing oxygen is by saving every tree that can stand up to the stresses of L.A.'s air quality?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1998 | DAWN HOBBS
Authorities are seeking help from anyone who may have had contact with a Camarillo man recently arrested on suspicion of drugging and sexually assaulting a woman after posing as a photographer. Ventura County sheriff's deputies say they already have spoken with some women who say they were approached by Stephen Surwin Sargent. Deputies also said they found photos of other women in nude and semi-nude poses at Sargent's house at 256 Camino Toluca.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1985 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, Times Staff Writer
The 25 men and women in Cow Canyon Saddle, as the small patch of level ground in the San Gabriel Mountains is called, stood quietly in the cold morning air. They drank coffee and talked a little. But mostly they waited. Finally a voice sounded over the radio: "Start the helicopter, 10-4." The bighorn sheep capture had begun. Veterinarians and other staffers from the state Department of Fish and Game checked their supplies; syringes, thermometers, ear tags.
NEWS
June 16, 1987 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
The first thing Trinity County Librarian Doris Callahan and her three assistants do when they come to work every day is dust their desks. "We dust in the morning and dust several times during the day, especially when big trucks rumble by the library," sighed Callahan, 58, who has been librarian in this remote rural county for 25 years. The Trinity County Library is housed in a 19-foot-wide, 70-foot-deep red brick building erected in 1856, during the boom years of the California Gold Rush.
NEWS
April 13, 1995 | TODD EVERETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For a piece of living history that's more than 50 years old, "Oklahoma!" remains in pretty good shape--more so, it might be argued, than most other revolutionary works of art. When it opened in 1943, "Oklahoma!"--the first collaboration between composer Richard Rodgers and lyricist Oscar Hammerstein II--set several precedents; enough of them, in fact, that the term musical play came to stand for "Oklahoma!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1991 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For thousands of years, the California least tern nested along the state's beaches, laying sand-colored eggs and hatching sandy-gray chicks. That was a successful evolutionary adaptation in the days when the diminutive sea bird's only significant predators were other birds and the occasional fox, coyote or rat. But those sandy, camouflaged eggs have become a liability. Unwitting surfers and sunbathers tromp on some. Beach maintenance crews roll over others.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2004 | Erin Ailworth, Times Staff Writer
The families wandered into the park in old shirts, comfy jeans and worn sneakers. The kids were kids: darting around trees and over logs. The parents were parents: cautioning not to get too close to the creek, you'll fall in. At 7 p.m., the soft orange tint to the light filtering through the trees signaled that sunset was near. Rumps settled onto brown wooden benches.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2000 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Small gestures are sometimes the most powerful. When the staff and architect were working on plans to renovate and expand the University Art Museum at UC Santa Barbara, they made a small gesture that adds up to a significant difference. The museum's entrance was moved from the north side of the building to the south side. Before, it opened onto a courtyard of the university's art department.
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