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Sandy Lerner

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March 1, 1998 | RENEE TAWA, Renee Tawa is a Times staff writer
Prologue -- "In polite society, you cut off your crusts."--Overheard at the Jane Austen Society's annual meeting. * The Janeites speak of her as a concept, a rather puzzling concept. "Oh, Mrs. Lerrr-nah," they muse. Otherwise, though her absence is notable, here, at Jane Austen's ancestral home, no one notes it.
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MAGAZINE
March 1, 1998 | RENEE TAWA, Renee Tawa is a Times staff writer
Prologue -- "In polite society, you cut off your crusts."--Overheard at the Jane Austen Society's annual meeting. * The Janeites speak of her as a concept, a rather puzzling concept. "Oh, Mrs. Lerrr-nah," they muse. Otherwise, though her absence is notable, here, at Jane Austen's ancestral home, no one notes it.
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MAGAZINE
May 3, 1998
Chawton House is technically not Jane Austen's "ancestral home" ("Sandy Lerner, in Your Face," by Renee Tawa, March 1). Austen and her siblings were born at Steventon Rectory, where her father was a poor but gentlemanly rector. Chawton House was part of the Knight family estate. Thomas and Catherine Knight, distant cousins of Austen's father, George, were childless, adopted Austen's brother Edward and made him their heir. Edward acquired the cottage in Chawton village for his widowed mother, Cassandra, and his two spinster sisters, Cassandra and Jane.
NEWS
August 13, 1998 | KATHRYN BOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Giannulli Mossimo announced his new role as "visionary" of the Irvine-based clothing company Mossimo Inc., his unorthodox title raised eyebrows in corporate America. Visionary? Wasn't that what they called people like Gandhi or JFK, not a guy who once made neon volley shorts with large Ms stamped on their backsides? To veterans of the Orange County fashion industry, however, Mossimo's recent moniker pronouncement caused hardly a ripple of interest.
NEWS
March 28, 2000 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cisco Systems, the maker of ubiquitous but largely unseen computing devices that route information across the Internet, surpassed Microsoft on Monday as the world's most valuable company, marking the Internet's emerging status as the dominant force of the new economy. Barely a decade after becoming a public company, Cisco's stock nudged up 69 cents Monday to close at $80.06 a share on Nasdaq. That was just enough to push the total market value of all the company's shares to $555.
NEWS
March 3, 1999 | MARY McNAMARA / TIMES STAFF WRITER
The subway stop is the first indication that things have changed more than slightly. Wall Street is not the first term one associates with Ms. magazine. This urban canyon, where stone scrapes sky and morning sun barely dribbles here and there onto the sidewalk, may be the perfect lair for number crunchers and financiers, but feminists? Twenty Exchange Place, the magazine's address, is halfway down an odd, dim alley where coats flap in ricochet winds.
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