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Sandy Lyle

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July 22, 1985 | MIKE LITTWIN, Times Staff Writer
Forget about ruling the waves. That's ancient history. And so is the Empire upon which the sun would never set. But Britain, once again, has the British Open champion. And, in these times of diminished expectations, that will do. Sandy Lyle, a Scot though born and bred in England, beat back the world to capture the Open championship before cheering thousands at Royal St. George's Sunday.
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SPORTS
July 15, 2003 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
Sandy Lyle, who won the British Open at Royal St. George's in 1985, can't believe it was that long ago. "It doesn't feel like 18 years," he said. "I can tell you that right now." Lyle's triumph on this course was the first of his two major titles. He also won the 1988 Masters. The key to success at Royal St. George's is still clear to Lyle. "You have to drive the ball straight," he said. "And no matter if you go 20 yards, 30 yards off line, you just go deeper and deeper into the jungle.
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SPORTS
April 16, 1988
Again the Masters lived up to to the drama inherent in the event. Sandy Lyle's 7-iron shot on the 72nd hole will rank among the greatest in golf. His future will no doubt lead to additional major championships. My emotions, however, were with Mark Calcavecchia. His poise and determination during the final nine holes demonstrated that he was certainly deserving of a champion's jacket. I'm sure that someday he will have a "fitting" victory at Augusta. DAVID HUBBS Orange
SPORTS
April 25, 1997 | From Associated Press
It got so bad for Sandy Lyle last week that his own caddie "sacked him" after missing yet another cut. On this side of the Atlantic, that means the caddie quit on the former Masters and British Open champion, who hasn't won on the PGA Tour since Augusta in 1988. So the struggling golfer from Scotland, the former No.
SPORTS
April 25, 1997 | From Associated Press
It got so bad for Sandy Lyle last week that his own caddie "sacked him" after missing yet another cut. On this side of the Atlantic, that means the caddie quit on the former Masters and British Open champion, who hasn't won on the PGA Tour since Augusta in 1988. So the struggling golfer from Scotland, the former No.
SPORTS
April 5, 1986 | Associated Press
Sandy Lyle of Scotland, the British Open champion, used his strength to set up an eight-under-par 64 and a 132 total that provided him with a five-stroke lead Friday in the second round of the $500,000 Greater Greensboro Open golf tournament. "It isn't often that everything goes to plan on the golf course. Today it did," said Lyle, who matched the course record on the Forest Oaks Country Club course and played without a bogey.
SPORTS
April 10, 1988 | Mike Downey
From the London Sun, July 16, 1987, right before the British Open: "EXCLUSIVE! By SANDY LYLE The break-up of my marriage has put me in better shape than I've ever been for an attack on the Open championship. That's the only bonus to emerge from the most painful period of my life. When my wife Christine decided to walk out--sadly there is no chance of any reconciliation--it would have been easy for me to take a couple of months off, mope around and feel sorry for myself.
SPORTS
April 3, 1988 | Associated Press
It was a supremely confident Sandy Lyle who assessed his position--three shots in front of the pack going into today's final round of the $1-million Greater Greensboro Open golf tournament. "I've been in this position before and I don't usually let them get away," said the globe-trotting veteran from Scotland who has scored victories on three continents.
SPORTS
April 9, 1988 | THOMAS BONK, Times Staff Writer
It was a great day for golf and for Sandy Lyle Friday at Augusta National, where the uncommonly hot Scot took a two-stroke lead and also discovered a cure for the common cold. Lyle, this year's leading money-winner, shot a five-under-par 67 when the wind slowed down, the greens sped up and the afternoon sun got the course about as warm as it was under Fuzzy Zoeller's collar. Last week, Lyle won at Greensboro, N.C.
SPORTS
July 15, 2003 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
Sandy Lyle, who won the British Open at Royal St. George's in 1985, can't believe it was that long ago. "It doesn't feel like 18 years," he said. "I can tell you that right now." Lyle's triumph on this course was the first of his two major titles. He also won the 1988 Masters. The key to success at Royal St. George's is still clear to Lyle. "You have to drive the ball straight," he said. "And no matter if you go 20 yards, 30 yards off line, you just go deeper and deeper into the jungle.
SPORTS
June 18, 1989 | Mal Florence
There's a recurring theme here at the 89th U.S. Open that isn't related to the activity on the course. Seve Ballesteros has said that some prominent foreign players will drop out of the PGA Tour in a few years if requirements for membership aren't reduced from 15 to 12 tournaments. Ballesteros is supported in his view by West Germany's Bernhard Langer and Britain's Nick Faldo and Sandy Lyle. However, PGA Tour Commissioner Deane Beman has been emphatic in retaining the status quo. "It's very difficult to play on both the European and American tours," Langer said.
SPORTS
June 15, 1989 | MAL FLORENCE, Times Staff Writer
Seve Ballesteros said he's getting a consistent answer from Commissioner Deane Beman of the PGA Tour on the restrictions put on him and other foreign golfers. The PGA Tour requires that foreign players play in at least 15 tournaments to be eligible for membership. Otherwise they are limited to five tour events a year, in addition to the Masters, U.S. Open and PGA Championship. Ballesteros, a Spaniard regarded as one of the world's best players, has had a running argument with Beman about the rule.
SPORTS
June 17, 1988 | THOMAS BONK, Times Staff Writer
After the first round of the U.S. Open, the three players tied for the lead included a guy whose hands were so swollen from the heat that he felt as if he was holding a baseball bat instead of a driver, another who had been playing so badly he thought about giving up golf to become a garbage collector, and the current Masters champion, who described his previous play in the Open as "a lot of trash."
SPORTS
April 16, 1988
Again the Masters lived up to to the drama inherent in the event. Sandy Lyle's 7-iron shot on the 72nd hole will rank among the greatest in golf. His future will no doubt lead to additional major championships. My emotions, however, were with Mark Calcavecchia. His poise and determination during the final nine holes demonstrated that he was certainly deserving of a champion's jacket. I'm sure that someday he will have a "fitting" victory at Augusta. DAVID HUBBS Orange
SPORTS
April 11, 1988 | THOMAS BONK, Times Staff Writer
On the last hole on the last day of the Masters tournament, Sandy Lyle thought his last chance to win had come to an end in a pit filled with sand. First, though, he would try to hit his golf ball and lift it out of the bunker dug into the red Georgia clay, the one that guards the left side of the 18th fairway at Augusta National. "I personally thought it was over," Lyle said. "I didn't think I would have a chance to get it out." He was wrong.
SPORTS
April 10, 1988 | THOMAS BONK, Times Staff Writer
For awhile, it looked as though Sandy Lyle would run away with the Masters. But when he left the 18th green Saturday afternoon at Augusta National, he was walking away, not running, after shooting a 72 for a 210 total. It is still Lyle's Masters to win today since he is the leader by two shots with 18 holes to play. However, this is also a period when leaders very often become followers. Accordingly, Lyle said he will carry one thought with him when he walks out to the first tee.
SPORTS
April 4, 1988 | Associated Press
Sandy Lyle won it in a playoff, but the Greater Greensboro Open probably was decided on the last hole of regulation play. There, Ken Green had a two-foot second putt to win it outright and gain a spot in next week's Masters. "I thought I was doomed," said Lyle, who had watched his chip for a birdie hit the back of the cup and bounce out on what appeared to be the last hole of play. "I'd given up hope, really. I didn't fancy him missing that putt," Lyle said. But he did.
SPORTS
April 7, 1986 | Associated Press
Sandy Lyle doesn't consider his adjustment to American golf complete. It is, however, a lot closer after the Scotsman overcame a nagging stigma Sunday by holding on to win the $500,000 Greater Greensboro Open. "I've worked very hard for it. There's been a lot of sweat lost over the last few days," said Lyle, a winner by two shots over Andy Bean. "It's very rewarding. The money's good, too." Lyle now goes to the Master's at Augusta, Ga.
SPORTS
April 10, 1988 | Mike Downey
From the London Sun, July 16, 1987, right before the British Open: "EXCLUSIVE! By SANDY LYLE The break-up of my marriage has put me in better shape than I've ever been for an attack on the Open championship. That's the only bonus to emerge from the most painful period of my life. When my wife Christine decided to walk out--sadly there is no chance of any reconciliation--it would have been easy for me to take a couple of months off, mope around and feel sorry for myself.
SPORTS
April 9, 1988 | THOMAS BONK, Times Staff Writer
It was a great day for golf and for Sandy Lyle Friday at Augusta National, where the uncommonly hot Scot took a two-stroke lead and also discovered a cure for the common cold. Lyle, this year's leading money-winner, shot a five-under-par 67 when the wind slowed down, the greens sped up and the afternoon sun got the course about as warm as it was under Fuzzy Zoeller's collar. Last week, Lyle won at Greensboro, N.C.
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