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Sandy R Kriegler

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1989
Gov. George Deukmejian has appointed two new Superior Court judges in Los Angeles County. The governor named Charles W. Stoll, 58, of Studio City, and Sandy R. Kriegler, 39, of Sherman Oaks, to the Los Angeles County bench. Stoll, who fills a newly created position, has been an attorney in private practice for 25 years in Glendale. He also served as a deputy county counsel of Los Angeles from 1959 to 1963.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1997 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's no easy job presiding over hotly contested, and often emotional, criminal trials. To win praise from both defense attorneys and prosecutors is twice as tough. But Van Nuys Superior Court Judge Sandy R. Kriegler manages to do both. This week, he became the first judge from the San Fernando Valley to be honored as Superior Court Judge of the Year by the prestigious 1,000-member Century City Bar Assn.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1997 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's no easy job presiding over hotly contested, and often emotional, criminal trials. To win praise from both defense attorneys and prosecutors is twice as tough. But Van Nuys Superior Court Judge Sandy R. Kriegler manages to do both. This week, he became the first judge from the San Fernando Valley to be honored as Superior Court Judge of the Year by the prestigious 1,000-member Century City Bar Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1989
Gov. George Deukmejian has appointed two new Superior Court judges in Los Angeles County. The governor named Charles W. Stoll, 58, of Studio City, and Sandy R. Kriegler, 39, of Sherman Oaks, to the Los Angeles County bench. Stoll, who fills a newly created position, has been an attorney in private practice for 25 years in Glendale. He also served as a deputy county counsel of Los Angeles from 1959 to 1963.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1988 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
The mandate from the community was to clean up the streets of Hollywood, and the job went to three of the toughest Municipal Court judges in Los Angeles. Elsewhere in the county, prostitutes and their customers rarely are sentenced to jail on a first offense. The usual penalty is a $150 fine. In Hollywood, however, the norm for first-time prostitute convictions became a five-day sentence and three days in jail for their customers. The judges--ex-cop Harold N.
NEWS
April 10, 1986
Three Municipal Court judges will begin hearing cases on Monday in the recently completed Hollywood Courthouse in the 5900 block of Hollywood Boulevard. Judges Harold N. Crowder, Sandy R. Kriegler and Michael Nash have been assigned to the court. Crowder has been appointed supervising judge. The two-story courthouse, which cost $6.6 million and took five years to build, contains three courtrooms, several offices and an attached two-level, 135-car parking structure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1985
Two San Fernando Valley lawyers were named Los Angeles County Municipal Court judges Wednesday. Sandy R. Kriegler, 35, of Sherman Oaks, and Meredith C. Taylor, 46, of Northridge, were appointed to the bench by Gov. George Deukmejian. Kriegler replaces William Pounders, who was elevated to the Los Angeles County Superior Court. Taylor replaces Howard Schwab, also elevated to the Superior Court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1991
Two teen-age suspects in the shotgun slaying of three young women in Pasadena in March must be tried as adults, a Pasadena Juvenile Court Judge ruled Tuesday. Because of the severity of the crimes they are alleged to have committed, David Adkins and Burton Vincin Hebrock, both 17, are unfit to stay in the jurisdiction of the Juvenile Court, said Judge Sandy R. Kriegler. Immediately after his ruling, Kriegler ordered the two transferred from Juvenile Hall to Los Angeles County Jail.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1993 | THOM MROZEK
An ex-convict was convicted Monday of first-degree murder in the execution-style killing of a Burbank business owner who was involved with the killer in a theft ring. Daniel Joseph Miller, 47, faces life in prison without the possibility of parole for the Oct. 16 killing of Stefan Sweetser, 23, who was shot five times in the back of the head and back from close range near a Tarzana construction site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1997 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN
A Reseda man with more than a decade-long history of burglaries was sentenced to 85 years to life in state prison Tuesday for breaking into two homes and a nonprofit charity championed by Cardinal Roger Mahony. Anthony Sposato, 38, who was convicted on a "third strike," will probably spend the rest of his life behind bars under the sentence handed down by Van Nuys Superior Court Judge Sandy R. Kriegler. "Mr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1988 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
The mandate from the community was to clean up the streets of Hollywood, and the job went to three of the toughest Municipal Court judges in Los Angeles. Elsewhere in the county, prostitutes and their customers rarely are sentenced to jail on a first offense. The usual penalty is a $150 fine. In Hollywood, however, the norm for first-time prostitute convictions became a five-day sentence and three days in jail for their customers. The judges--ex-cop Harold N.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1996
In an unusual move, a Superior Court judge threw out the second-degree murder conviction of a North Hollywood apartment house manager who shot a fleeing car burglar, reducing the offense to voluntary manslaughter and sentencing him to the minimum six years in prison. Over the prosecutor's protests that the crime was "a classic case of vigilantism," Judge Sandy R. Kriegler said that although Daniel Bernard McDonald committed "an intentional killing," he acted "without malice or forethought."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1997 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man described as the "main player" in a series of rapes and robberies of Valley-area masseuses was sentenced to life in state prison Tuesday. Christopher Terrell Dickson must serve at least 87 years behind bars before he is eligible for parole under the 103-year sentence handed down by Van Nuys Superior Court Judge Sandy R. Kriegler, officials said. Dickson, 30, was convicted in July of rape, robbery, sexual battery and burglary.
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