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Sandy Saemann

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BUSINESS
May 28, 1991 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last year was a tough one for retailers and builders. When the economy slowed and the Persian Gulf crisis erupted, the housing market collapsed and retail sales slowed. Thousands of workers were laid off, and numerous companies failed. The carnage ripped through executive suites as well. Although there were not a lot of chief executives who lost their jobs, their pay often was pared substantially. The top two executives at L.A.
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BUSINESS
June 13, 1991 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sneaker marketer L.A. Gear on Wednesday announced the surprise resignation of its No. 2 executive, Sandy Saemann, a longtime associate of company Chairman Robert Y. Greenberg. L.A. Gear said the decision was Saemann's own and was unrelated to its agreement announced two weeks ago to sell an effective 30% stake in the slumping company to Roy E. Disney's Trefoil Capital Investors fund. In its news release, Marina del Rey-based L.A.
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BUSINESS
March 21, 1991 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
L.A. Gear's chairman, Robert Y. Greenberg, is planning to work for free until the sneaker firm makes money again. But he is not getting much sympathy. L.A. Gear also disclosed Wednesday that Greenberg earned $3.47 million in cash compensation last year, while its No. 2 executive, Sandy Saemann, received $2.54 million. That came in a fiscal year when L.A. Gear's earnings fell 43% to $31.
BUSINESS
May 28, 1991 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last year was a tough one for retailers and builders. When the economy slowed and the Persian Gulf crisis erupted, the housing market collapsed and retail sales slowed. Thousands of workers were laid off, and numerous companies failed. The carnage ripped through executive suites as well. Although there were not a lot of chief executives who lost their jobs, their pay often was pared substantially. The top two executives at L.A.
BUSINESS
June 13, 1991 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sneaker marketer L.A. Gear on Wednesday announced the surprise resignation of its No. 2 executive, Sandy Saemann, a longtime associate of company Chairman Robert Y. Greenberg. L.A. Gear said the decision was Saemann's own and was unrelated to its agreement announced two weeks ago to sell an effective 30% stake in the slumping company to Roy E. Disney's Trefoil Capital Investors fund. In its news release, Marina del Rey-based L.A.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, Times Staff Writer
Michael Jackson is the $20-million corporate spokesman who won't speak. "Protect me. . . . Don't let them ask me any questions," Jackson whispered Wednesday morning to a top executive from L.A. Gear, moments after the enigmatic pop star told a Hollywood Palladium full of reporters that he was "very happy" to be a part of the L.A. Gear team. By next spring, Jackson will be starring in L.A. Gear commercials. In the meantime he will help design and market a new line of L.A. Gear shoes.
BUSINESS
June 1, 1990 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Move over, Michael Eisner. While Walt Disney Co.'s chief executive and other senior officers at the Magic Kingdom have reigned as the princes of pay for two years, the top three executives at trendy athletic-shoe maker L.A. Gear are hard on their heels. Because of a performance-related compensation plan that's much like Disney's, Robert Y. Greenberg, L.A. Gear's chairman and president, earned $5.4 million in 1989, according to the company's proxy statement, released this week.
BUSINESS
June 28, 1990 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sneaker maker L.A. Gear, disclosing its most disappointing earnings since becoming a public company in 1986, said Wednesday that its second-quarter profit fell 36% despite a 33% increase in sales. The Marina del Rey-based company warned investors June 1 that its earnings would be off as much as 40% for the quarter ended May 31, so the official report was perhaps not as bad as some expected.
BUSINESS
October 31, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
L.A. Gear is looking for an agency to fit the shoe. The Los Angeles athletic shoe maker has quietly launched a review for an agency to create ads for a new, high-tech line of athletic shoe. Whatever agency is selected could eventually end up with the creative portion of the company's $68-million annual ad business. "L.A. Gear wants its advertising to be the best there is," said Michael Albright, the former creative director of the Shalek Agency, who last week was named creative director of L.A.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1991 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
L.A. Gear's chairman, Robert Y. Greenberg, is planning to work for free until the sneaker firm makes money again. But he is not getting much sympathy. L.A. Gear also disclosed Wednesday that Greenberg earned $3.47 million in cash compensation last year, while its No. 2 executive, Sandy Saemann, received $2.54 million. That came in a fiscal year when L.A. Gear's earnings fell 43% to $31.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1989 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
L.A. Gear Inc., the rapidly growing sneaker company, announced Monday that one of its top officers quit after rejecting a contract offer that would have cut his seven-figure salary. The company, which has been dogged by speculation that its business is cooling, also released a preliminary sales report indicating that its revenue jumped 134% in its fiscal fourth quarter. L.A. Gear's stock, which fell $8.375 last week, rose $2.25 on Monday's news to close at $35.25 on the New York Stock Exchange.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1991 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
L.A. Gear's ad agency has given the sneaker maker the boot. The Los Angeles office of BBDO Worldwide on Friday said it was resigning the account primarily because of creative and strategic differences. The loss of its ad agency--which L.A. Gear named with great hoopla just three months ago--represents yet another in a series of blows the once high-flying Marina del Rey firm has suffered recently. Earlier this week rival Nike Inc. sued L.A.
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