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NEWS
January 17, 1997 | ERIC HARRISON and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Atlanta police stood guard outside city abortion clinics Thursday night after two explosions earlier in the day rocked a suburban building that housed a clinic, injuring six people. The second blast caused all the injuries, sustained by law enforcement, rescue workers and a television cameraman who had gathered after the first explosion 45 minutes earlier. None of the injuries were life-threatening.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
Sen. Paul Coverdell, a longtime Republican politician in Georgia who became a congressional workhorse and quickly ascended to a leadership post, died Tuesday of a stroke. He was 61. Coverdell had surgery Monday to relieve pressure from a cerebral hemorrhage but died from swelling in the brain, according to a statement from Piedmont Hospital. The senator was hospitalized Saturday night after complaining of severe headaches. He had reported no serious health problems in the past.
SPORTS
July 24, 2007 | Lance Pugmire, Times Staff Writer
The NFL on Monday ordered Atlanta Falcons quarterback Michael Vick to stay away from the team's training camp until the league reviews the federal dogfighting charges against him.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1988 | United Press International
The sudden death of Pete Petit's infant son 18 years ago changed his life and saved untold others. The grief-stricken engineer has built a multimillion-dollar corporation dedicated to giving infants a greater chance at survival. Driven by grief and armed only with a drawing of a revolutionary product, the aerospace engineer left a high-paying job at Lockheed-Georgia to start a health-care company following the death of his 6-month-old son, a victim of sudden infant death syndrome, in 1970.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2011 | By Mitchell Landsberg, Los Angeles Times
Three hundred rabbis walk into a Las Vegas martini lounge. Bartenders scramble to handle the crowd — the rabbis are thirsty. Suddenly, an Elvis impersonator takes the stage. We are faced with two possibilities. One, this is the beginning of a joke. Two, they don't make rabbis the way they used to. The Rabbinical Assembly, the clerical arm of Conservative Judaism, would have you believe the second message, or something like it. That's why it launched its 2011 convention with a martini reception at a Las Vegas synagogue.
TRAVEL
June 26, 2011 | By George Fuller, Special to the Los Angeles Times
For the junk food junkie, a road trip can be a dream journey. Between the fast food outlets and the glop at gas station minimarts, travelers may find themselves on a never-ending sugar/trans-fat wallow. But on a monthlong road trip from Los Angeles to Naples, Fla., to visit friends and family, my wife, Landry, and I decided to go another direction: We would eat healthfully. It was a challenge, but not an insurmountable one if you knew where to look. Our goal on this trip was to find those hidden, healthful dining oases.
NEWS
September 30, 1999 | SANG-HUN CHOE CHARLES J. HANLEY and MARTHA MENDOZA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It was a story no one wanted to hear: Early in the Korean War, villagers said, American soldiers machine-gunned hundreds of helpless civilians under a railroad bridge in the South Korean countryside. When the families spoke out, seeking redress, they met only rejection and denial, from the U.S. military and from their own government in Seoul. Now a dozen veterans have spoken too, and support their story with haunting memories from a "forgotten" war.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2005 | Daryl Kelley, Times Staff Writer
California has remained America's growth machine in the 21st century, serving as a magnet for foreign immigration and feeding a surge of migration to Las Vegas, Phoenix and throughout the West. But the exodus from California has slowed dramatically, as residents of the pricey coastal plain have moved to cheaper inland valleys instead of leaving the state.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2010 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Carol J. Williams and Robert Faturechi
At least 56 people have died in U.S. traffic accidents in which sudden unintended acceleration of Toyota Motor Corp. vehicles has been alleged, according to complaints filed with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, lawsuits and police and state highway patrol reports. Some of the victims' names are unknown because NHTSA did not disclose them and they could not be confirmed through other sources. A Toyota spokesman declined to comment, saying the company does not discuss cases in which litigation has been, or could be, filed.
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