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Sanford L Kane

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BUSINESS
June 22, 1989 | JONATHAN WEBER, Times Staff Writer
Sanford L. Kane worked in finance jobs for most of his 27 years at IBM, but he says he's always enjoyed getting his hands dirty on the shop floor. That might be just the right combination for the venture he has been named to run, U.S. Memories Inc., which will have to combine manufacturing excellence with tight cost controls to prosper in the fiercely competitive computer memory chip market. "I didn't sit in my office and read reports. I got out onto the site," Kane said of a stint as controller of an IBM plant in Fishkill, N.Y. "The longer you spend in a place like that, the more you appreciate the genius" of the work force.
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BUSINESS
January 16, 1990 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Sanford Kane, the end of U.S. Memories came swiftly and without any advance warning last Wednesday in a Dallas hotel room. After meeting all morning with representatives of 11 electronics firms--seven that had already agreed to support the novel chip-making cooperative and four others that had been straddling the fence--Kane told the group that it was time to finally count how much money everyone was willing to give the venture. With that, "the room got real quiet, real fast," Kane, U.S.
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BUSINESS
June 22, 1989 | JONATHAN WEBER and PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writers
In a move that dwarfs previous efforts to beat back the Japanese challenge in technology, seven leading U.S. electronics firms Wednesday unveiled plans for a $1-billion venture aimed at restoring a strong American presence in the critical area of computer memory chip production. The proposed company, U.S. Memories Inc., would be jointly owned by American computer and semiconductor companies while operating as an independent commercial entity. It is currently described as "a corporation in formation," and a final decision whether to go ahead depends on gaining antitrust clearance from the government and attracting additional investors.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1990 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Memories, an ambitious venture to wrest control of the vital computer memory chip market from the Japanese, officially folded on Monday, a victim of lackluster support from the American electronics industry it was designed to aid.
BUSINESS
December 26, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sanford L. Kane was flush with success last June when he publicly unveiled plans for U.S. Memories, a semiconductor manufacturing cooperative that he would lead. After all, the venture--designed to provide a domestic source of key computer memory chips--was backed by a veritable "Who's Who" of American high-technology companies, and it promised to solve one of the industry's most vexing problems: Japanese domination of the memory chip market. Then reality set in.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1990 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Sanford Kane, the end of U.S. Memories came swiftly and without any advance warning last Wednesday in a Dallas hotel room. After meeting all morning with representatives of 11 electronics firms--seven that had already agreed to support the novel chip-making cooperative and four others that had been straddling the fence--Kane told the group that it was time to finally count how much money everyone was willing to give the venture. With that, "the room got real quiet, real fast," Kane, U.S.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1990 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Memories, an ambitious venture to wrest control of the vital computer memory chip market from the Japanese, officially folded on Monday, a victim of lackluster support from the American electronics industry it was designed to aid.
BUSINESS
December 26, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sign behind T. J. Rodgers' desk reads simply: "Be reasonable, demand the impossible." But what happens when the best known of Silicon Valley's new generation of computer chip makers doesn't get what he wants? "Gee, I don't know," reflects his assistant. "It's never happened." It didn't happen in 1983 when Rodgers, then age 35 and with one semiconductor failure already under his belt, persuaded Silicon Valley's top venture capitalists to put up $7.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1990
Sanford L. Kane, former head of the aborted U.S. Memories semiconductor venture, has been named president and chief executive of Chatsworth-based PCO Inc. PCO, a joint venture between Corning Inc. and International Business Machines, manufactures optoelectronic interfaces, a key component in the operation of fiber optic technology used in telecommunications and other applications.
BUSINESS
December 26, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sanford L. Kane was flush with success last June when he publicly unveiled plans for U.S. Memories, a semiconductor manufacturing cooperative that he would lead. After all, the venture--designed to provide a domestic source of key computer memory chips--was backed by a veritable "Who's Who" of American high-technology companies, and it promised to solve one of the industry's most vexing problems: Japanese domination of the memory chip market. Then reality set in.
BUSINESS
December 26, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sign behind T. J. Rodgers' desk reads simply: "Be reasonable, demand the impossible." But what happens when the best known of Silicon Valley's new generation of computer chip makers doesn't get what he wants? "Gee, I don't know," reflects his assistant. "It's never happened." It didn't happen in 1983 when Rodgers, then age 35 and with one semiconductor failure already under his belt, persuaded Silicon Valley's top venture capitalists to put up $7.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1989 | JONATHAN WEBER, Times Staff Writer
Sanford L. Kane worked in finance jobs for most of his 27 years at IBM, but he says he's always enjoyed getting his hands dirty on the shop floor. That might be just the right combination for the venture he has been named to run, U.S. Memories Inc., which will have to combine manufacturing excellence with tight cost controls to prosper in the fiercely competitive computer memory chip market. "I didn't sit in my office and read reports. I got out onto the site," Kane said of a stint as controller of an IBM plant in Fishkill, N.Y. "The longer you spend in a place like that, the more you appreciate the genius" of the work force.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1989 | JONATHAN WEBER and PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writers
In a move that dwarfs previous efforts to beat back the Japanese challenge in technology, seven leading U.S. electronics firms Wednesday unveiled plans for a $1-billion venture aimed at restoring a strong American presence in the critical area of computer memory chip production. The proposed company, U.S. Memories Inc., would be jointly owned by American computer and semiconductor companies while operating as an independent commercial entity. It is currently described as "a corporation in formation," and a final decision whether to go ahead depends on gaining antitrust clearance from the government and attracting additional investors.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A high-flying U.S. venture to regain control of the vital computer chip industry from Japanese dominance folded today because it failed to attract investors. Santa Clara-based U.S. Memories Inc. was hailed as a $1-billion cooperative venture by American companies, but in its seven brief months of life it failed to make a single computer chip or earn a single dollar. "I am extremely disappointed by this turn of events," Sanford L. Kane, president of U.S. Memories, said at a news conference.
BUSINESS
April 10, 1987 | Associated Press
Suppliers to the U.S. semiconductor industry are crucial to the future of American electronics and need to join forces to stay alive, an IBM executive told a group of industry leaders Thursday. The troubles of chip makers have been widely publicized recently, but the more than 800 U.S. companies that supply them with equipment are in even more severe financial straits, authorities agree. If the equipment makers die off, U.S.
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