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Sanford Meisner

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NEWS
February 5, 1997
Sanford Meisner, 91, an actor and venerated acting teacher and an original member of New York's Group Theatre. The innovative organization, which included Lee Strasberg, Elia Kazan and other theatrical leaders, was founded in 1931. Meisner appeared in 12 of its early productions including its first, "The House of Connelly." Meisner also acted on Broadway in "Embezzled," "Crime and Punishment" and "The Cold Wind and the Warm."
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1997 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's a newcomer in the NoHo Arts District called Theatre Unlimited, and it looks as though the group might be around for a while. Its home was once called the Wild Side, a sketch comedy and improv venue next door to the Iguana Cafe on Camarillo Street. The Iguana is long gone, and its former home has been combined with the theater space. Elizabeth Wells, Theatre Unlimited's executive director, says the company is settling in.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1990 | SYLVIE DRAKE
"Still as wonderful and funny and terrifying as ever" is how Suzanne Pleshette, one of the many actors and directors interviewed on "Sanford Meisner: The Theater's Best Kept Secret," characterizes her widely respected acting teacher (and actor). This hourlong "American Playhouse" valentine to the 85-year-old Meisner (airing tonight at 10 on KCET Channel 28) shows a tough, principled man who, by his own admission, is happiest in a roomful of students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1997 | STEPHEN BYRD
In a 1990 televised tribute on "American Playhouse," Sanford Meisner expressed a simple and concise definition of acting. "Acting is doing," he told a student. "Meaningful acting is doing under emotional circumstances." An original member of the renowned Group Theatre collective in New York during the 1930s, Meisner was for more than 50 years considered by theater and film experts one of the country's top acting teachers, part of a circle that included Lee Strasberg, Stella Adler and Elia Kazan.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1996 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the 1930s, an explosion erupted on Broadway. It was called the Group Theatre. Founding members of the collective included Elia Kazan, Clifford Odets, Robert Lewis, Stella Adler, Lee Strasberg, Harold Clurman and Sanford Meisner, all names that changed the vision and future of American theater. Although the Group lasted but 10 years, some of these legendary acting gurus are still active, and some have been honored by having their names attached to local theaters.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1995 | PHILIP BRANDES
Famed acting teacher Sanford Meisner spent more than 60 years evolving methods that brought the talents of numerous stars to fruition. His techniques yield impressive performances from trainees in the Sunday program of "The Sanford Meisner One-Act Festival" in a NoHo studio (formerly the home of Acme Comedy Theatre). Meisner's instructional approach emphasizes realistic interaction between actors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1997 | STEPHEN BYRD
In a 1990 televised tribute on "American Playhouse," Sanford Meisner expressed a simple and concise definition of acting. "Acting is doing," he told a student. "Meaningful acting is doing under emotional circumstances." An original member of the renowned Group Theatre collective in New York during the 1930s, Meisner was for more than 50 years considered by theater and film experts one of the country's top acting teachers, part of a circle that included Lee Strasberg, Stella Adler and Elia Kazan.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1997 | SHAUNA SNOW
KUDOS Scorsese's Fans: Robert De Niro, Jodie Foster, Spike Lee, Michelle Pfeiffer, Winona Ryder, Joe Pesci, Rosanna Arquette, Paul Sorvino and James Woods are among those who will fete director Martin Scorsese when he receives the American Film Institute Life Achievement Award Feb. 20 at the Beverly Hilton. Sharon Stone, an Oscar nominee for Scorsese's "Casino," will host. Tickets still are available, but they're a hefty $1,000 and up.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1997 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's a newcomer in the NoHo Arts District called Theatre Unlimited, and it looks as though the group might be around for a while. Its home was once called the Wild Side, a sketch comedy and improv venue next door to the Iguana Cafe on Camarillo Street. The Iguana is long gone, and its former home has been combined with the theater space. Elizabeth Wells, Theatre Unlimited's executive director, says the company is settling in.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1989 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
It is well known these days that you don't just go out and start a theater. You need a building committee, a site search, a fund drive and many, many press conferences. This was not known in 1931. Dissatisfied with the light-minded shows that Broadway was offering, Harold Clurman and his colleagues decided to start their own theater. They would find new plays that showed what was really going on in Depression America. They would perform them like artists, not like a stock company.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1997 | SHAUNA SNOW
KUDOS Scorsese's Fans: Robert De Niro, Jodie Foster, Spike Lee, Michelle Pfeiffer, Winona Ryder, Joe Pesci, Rosanna Arquette, Paul Sorvino and James Woods are among those who will fete director Martin Scorsese when he receives the American Film Institute Life Achievement Award Feb. 20 at the Beverly Hilton. Sharon Stone, an Oscar nominee for Scorsese's "Casino," will host. Tickets still are available, but they're a hefty $1,000 and up.
NEWS
February 5, 1997
Sanford Meisner, 91, an actor and venerated acting teacher and an original member of New York's Group Theatre. The innovative organization, which included Lee Strasberg, Elia Kazan and other theatrical leaders, was founded in 1931. Meisner appeared in 12 of its early productions including its first, "The House of Connelly." Meisner also acted on Broadway in "Embezzled," "Crime and Punishment" and "The Cold Wind and the Warm."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1996 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the 1930s, an explosion erupted on Broadway. It was called the Group Theatre. Founding members of the collective included Elia Kazan, Clifford Odets, Robert Lewis, Stella Adler, Lee Strasberg, Harold Clurman and Sanford Meisner, all names that changed the vision and future of American theater. Although the Group lasted but 10 years, some of these legendary acting gurus are still active, and some have been honored by having their names attached to local theaters.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1995 | PHILIP BRANDES
Famed acting teacher Sanford Meisner spent more than 60 years evolving methods that brought the talents of numerous stars to fruition. His techniques yield impressive performances from trainees in the Sunday program of "The Sanford Meisner One-Act Festival" in a NoHo studio (formerly the home of Acme Comedy Theatre). Meisner's instructional approach emphasizes realistic interaction between actors.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1990 | SYLVIE DRAKE
"Still as wonderful and funny and terrifying as ever" is how Suzanne Pleshette, one of the many actors and directors interviewed on "Sanford Meisner: The Theater's Best Kept Secret," characterizes her widely respected acting teacher (and actor). This hourlong "American Playhouse" valentine to the 85-year-old Meisner (airing tonight at 10 on KCET Channel 28) shows a tough, principled man who, by his own admission, is happiest in a roomful of students.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1989 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
It is well known these days that you don't just go out and start a theater. You need a building committee, a site search, a fund drive and many, many press conferences. This was not known in 1931. Dissatisfied with the light-minded shows that Broadway was offering, Harold Clurman and his colleagues decided to start their own theater. They would find new plays that showed what was really going on in Depression America. They would perform them like artists, not like a stock company.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1996 | SCOTT COLLINS
"In the Company of Friends" at the Sanford Meisner Center for the Arts in North Hollywood is a double bill of one-act plays written and directed by Lynn Mamet. The first, "The Job," is a disaster, a crowded and chaotic ensemble piece set in a neighborhood bar frequented by tough-talking cops. The conflict is supplied by veteran cop Bobby (Kelly Edward Nelson), who's down on himself and his career after humiliating a suspect during an interrogation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2008 | From a Times Staff Writer
Stanley Kamel, a veteran character actor who appeared most recently in the USA television network series "Monk" as detective Adrian Monk's psychiatrist, has died. He was 65. Kamel was found dead of a heart attack Tuesday at his Los Angeles home by his longtime agents and friends Donna Massetti and Marilyn Szatmary, publicist Cynthia Snyder said Wednesday in a statement.
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