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Sanford Sylvan

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April 5, 1992 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a frequent contributor to Calendar
To many, he's the wheelchair-bound victim of Palestinian cruise ship hijackers in the controversial John Adams-Peter Sellars opera "The Death of Klinghoffer." To others, he's the gentle Chou En-lai of "Nixon in China." And for some, he's one of the musical pillars of Sellars' trendy updatings of "Le Nozze di Figaro" and "Cosi fan Tutte." But for baritone Sanford Sylvan, one of opera's increasingly lauded young voices, such new American work is only part of the picture.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2003 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
A singer's operatic skills don't necessarily guarantee success in the smaller-scale lieder repertory. But when baritone Sanford Sylvan sang Schubert's song cycle "Winterreise" on Sunday afternoon in the Orange County Performing Arts Center's Founders Hall, his background must have helped. In the past, Sylvan has supplied vivid characterizations in Peter Sellars' stagings of the Mozart-Da Ponte operas and in roles written for him by John Adams.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1998 | ELAINE DUTKA, Elaine Dutka is a Times staff writer
Sanford Sylvan isn't your usual baritone. Instead of making the operatic stage his sole focus, he has a commitment to art-song recitals. They do little to boost the singer's profile, and even less for his bankbook. But they provide balance to the glitzier fare--and a chance to breathe life into a genre some dismiss as stuffy and highbrow.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1998 | ELAINE DUTKA, Elaine Dutka is a Times staff writer
Sanford Sylvan isn't your usual baritone. Instead of making the operatic stage his sole focus, he has a commitment to art-song recitals. They do little to boost the singer's profile, and even less for his bankbook. But they provide balance to the glitzier fare--and a chance to breathe life into a genre some dismiss as stuffy and highbrow.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2003 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
A singer's operatic skills don't necessarily guarantee success in the smaller-scale lieder repertory. But when baritone Sanford Sylvan sang Schubert's song cycle "Winterreise" on Sunday afternoon in the Orange County Performing Arts Center's Founders Hall, his background must have helped. In the past, Sylvan has supplied vivid characterizations in Peter Sellars' stagings of the Mozart-Da Ponte operas and in roles written for him by John Adams.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1990 | John Henken
Based on the Whitman poem, "The Wound Dresser" is a vividly atmospheric piece, with stunning orchestral touches supporting the arching, aching, yet understated vocal line. Sylvan supplies dignity and clarity, with well-balanced accompaniment from the composer. "Fearful Symmetries" is equally deftly scored, but in the cause of a relentless pop parody. It swiftly outlasts its welcome, though the disc as a whole lasts only a stingy 47 minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1992 | JOHN HENKEN
The Grammys' classical field was dominated by John Corigliano's Symphony No. 1, as recorded by Daniel Barenboim and the Chicago Symphony. It rang up nominations for album, orchestral performance, contemporary composition, engineering, and classical producer of the year.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2001 | Josef Woodard
* * * * IVES: "When the Moon" Susan Narucki, soprano; Sanford Sylvan, tenor; Alan Feinberg, pianist; Music Projects, Richard Bernas, conductor Decca It's an accepted irony that for a great American composer, Charles Ives doesn't command nearly enough space in CD bins or on concert programs. That void amplifies the importance of a recording like this one, which bravely expands the Ives discography beyond the usual Ivesian suspects.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1992 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a frequent contributor to Calendar
To many, he's the wheelchair-bound victim of Palestinian cruise ship hijackers in the controversial John Adams-Peter Sellars opera "The Death of Klinghoffer." To others, he's the gentle Chou En-lai of "Nixon in China." And for some, he's one of the musical pillars of Sellars' trendy updatings of "Le Nozze di Figaro" and "Cosi fan Tutte." But for baritone Sanford Sylvan, one of opera's increasingly lauded young voices, such new American work is only part of the picture.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1990 | John Henken
Based on the Whitman poem, "The Wound Dresser" is a vividly atmospheric piece, with stunning orchestral touches supporting the arching, aching, yet understated vocal line. Sylvan supplies dignity and clarity, with well-balanced accompaniment from the composer. "Fearful Symmetries" is equally deftly scored, but in the cause of a relentless pop parody. It swiftly outlasts its welcome, though the disc as a whole lasts only a stingy 47 minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1996 | HERBERT GLASS
Appearing on Wednesday in the Blossom Room of the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, this season's edition of the traveling Musicians From Marlboro delivered a stimulating, unhackneyed program with unfailing aplomb. The Chamber Music in Historic Sites event was launched by Shostakovich's rarely heard Sixth String Quartet, in reality a series of solos, duos and trios involving four players, which begins in a deceptively bouncy-jolly vein and gradually blossoms into hysterical giddiness.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1999
He was in one of rock's greatest bands, Led Zeppelin. Now bassist and keyboardist John Paul Jones is on his first solo tour of the United States. * House of Blues, 8430 Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood. (323) 848-5100. 9 p.m. Music Esa-Pekka Salonen conducts the world premiere of Steven Stucky's "American Muse," with baritone soloist Sanford Sylvan. * Los Angeles Philharmonic, Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, 135 N. Grand Ave. (213) 365-3500. 8 p.m. Also Saturday at 8 p.m., Sunday at 2:30 p.m.
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