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Sani Abacha

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NEWS
September 26, 1993 | MARK FRITZ, ASSOCIATED PRESS
What a busy decade it's been for Gen. Sani Abacha of Nigeria. Two coups carried out, one crushed, and a fourth pulled off so deftly that nobody is sure if it really was a coup. Abacha is arguably the most powerful man in Nigeria. He was a pivotal figure in a decade of military regimes and remains the only general in the civilian government of mild-mannered businessman Ernest Shonekan.
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WORLD
February 17, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Switzerland will return to Nigeria about $458 million that was siphoned into Swiss bank accounts by the African country's former dictator, Gen. Sani Abacha, the Supreme Court ruled, quashing an appeal by his family. The Justice Department had designated $498 million for return, but the family objected. The court ruled that all but $40 million was "of clearly criminal origin," the department said in a statement.
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NEWS
January 4, 2002 | From Reuters
The family of late dictator Sani Abacha has been forced to pay back nearly $148 million to Nigeria, an official statement said Thursday, in what appeared to be the largest recovery of stolen funds in the country's history. But the sum is minuscule compared with what is still missing. President Olusegun Obasanjo's government estimates that nearly $3 billion was salted away from oil-producing Nigeria by Abacha and his associates during his 4 1/2-year ironfisted rule.
NEWS
January 4, 2002 | From Reuters
The family of late dictator Sani Abacha has been forced to pay back nearly $148 million to Nigeria, an official statement said Thursday, in what appeared to be the largest recovery of stolen funds in the country's history. But the sum is minuscule compared with what is still missing. President Olusegun Obasanjo's government estimates that nearly $3 billion was salted away from oil-producing Nigeria by Abacha and his associates during his 4 1/2-year ironfisted rule.
NEWS
November 24, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During a recent week here, Seye Kehinde slept in three safehouses, used codes and clandestine drops to pass along documents and wore a disguise for a secret meeting with his associates. Despite his cloak-and-dagger lifestyle, Kehinde is no spy. He is an editor, one of scores of underground journalists in Nigeria who somehow publish independent newspapers and magazines--and risk their lives--in defiance of Gen. Sani Abacha's military regime.
NEWS
April 26, 1998 | Associated Press
By the millions, Nigerians didn't vote Saturday in legislative elections billed as the first step toward ending the country's military rule. Opponents of Gen. Sani Abacha's military regime urged voters to stay away to show disapproval of his presidential nomination by all five political parties. They accuse Abacha of manipulating both the presidential nomination process and the legislative elections.
WORLD
February 17, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Switzerland will return to Nigeria about $458 million that was siphoned into Swiss bank accounts by the African country's former dictator, Gen. Sani Abacha, the Supreme Court ruled, quashing an appeal by his family. The Justice Department had designated $498 million for return, but the family objected. The court ruled that all but $40 million was "of clearly criminal origin," the department said in a statement.
NEWS
May 9, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The military junta has arrested the leader of a human rights group that led several recent protests against the regime. Olisa Agbakoba, chairman of United Action for Democracy, was seized by police at the international airport in Lagos upon his return from Ghana, the group said in a statement. Police declined to comment. The group claimed responsibility for an anti-government protest in the southwestern city of Ibadan last week that left seven people dead and dozens of cars and homes burned.
NEWS
April 21, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
With his candidacy still undeclared, Gen. Sani Abacha apparently ensured a victory at presidential polls set for Aug. 1 by winning the nomination of the fifth of five government-sanctioned political parties. The Grassroots Democratic Movement chose him in a vote in the northeastern town of Maiduguri. But armed riot police were called in to quell shouts of "We don't want cheating! We don't want Abacha!"
NEWS
April 18, 1998 | Associated Press
Shortly after nominating dictator Gen. Sani Abacha for president, Nigeria's largest government-backed political party insisted that he resign from the military before campaigning, news reports said Friday. "We are talking about a transition to democracy," Gbazuagu N'Gbazuagu, secretary of the United Nigeria Congress Party, said in an interview carried Friday in Lagos newspapers. "We will not, I repeat, we will not support his being in uniform to contest" the presidency.
NEWS
January 10, 1999 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Newspaper editor Dele Alake left a cocktail party one recent evening, jumped into his car and did something he hadn't done for years. He drove straight home. "Now I can drive home without looking through my rear window to see if I'm being followed," said Alake, whose popular National Concord newspaper was a fervent critic of the oppressive military regime of former dictator Gen. Sani Abacha. "The psychological pressure is off."
NEWS
June 9, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The abrupt death Monday of Nigerian leader Gen. Sani Abacha, one of Africa's most notorious and reclusive dictators, leaves the continent's most populous nation at a critical crossroads, U.S. officials and Africa experts said. The Clinton administration and international human rights groups immediately called on the military-led Provisional Ruling Council in Nigeria to seize the opportunity to launch a long-delayed transition to civilian rule.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1998 | RICHARD L. SKLAR, Richard L. Sklar is a professor emeritus of political science at UCLA
The sudden death of Nigeria's reclusive military dictator, Gen. Sani Abacha, could prove to be a turning point in Africa's most populous nation's struggle for democracy and its relationship with the world. Abacha had been a central figure in the conduct of several military coups d'etat and other, aborted military insurrections for two decades.
NEWS
June 6, 1998 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Upon landing at London's Gatwick Airport one recent morning, the Nigerian travelers were separated from the rest and ushered into a room. British customs officials proceeded to comb through their suitcases, while frisky hounds poked their muzzles into the group's handbags and thoroughly sniffed their body parts.
NEWS
May 9, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The military junta has arrested the leader of a human rights group that led several recent protests against the regime. Olisa Agbakoba, chairman of United Action for Democracy, was seized by police at the international airport in Lagos upon his return from Ghana, the group said in a statement. Police declined to comment. The group claimed responsibility for an anti-government protest in the southwestern city of Ibadan last week that left seven people dead and dozens of cars and homes burned.
NEWS
April 29, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
A week after Gen. Sani Abacha became the only candidate for Nigeria's presidency, his military junta on Tuesday sentenced Abacha's former right-hand man and five others to death for plotting to overthrow him. A seven-man military tribunal, which has been sitting in secret here in the central town of Jos, said 30 people had been tried for treason. Lt. Gen. Oladipo Diya is the most prominent figure now facing execution by firing squad. Others include Maj. Gen. Abdulkareem Adisa and Maj. Gen.
NEWS
November 19, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
Gen. Sani Abacha, Nigeria's new military ruler, dissolved the country's two political parties and all democratically elected bodies Thursday in the most sweeping changes in Nigeria in a decade. In a 10-minute broadcast, his first since assuming office Wednesday, the military strongman said national and state assemblies, state governments, local councils and the National Electoral Commission were dissolved, and political meetings and associations were banned.
NEWS
September 7, 1994 | From Associated Press
Flexing his muscles after defeating a pro-democracy strike, Nigeria's army ruler on Tuesday banned three newspaper groups, made it easier to keep opponents jailed and decreed that his regime has absolute power. Thousands of Nigerian oil workers ended a two-month strike Monday, caving in to the military government of Gen. Sani Abacha. They went on strike to demand Abacha surrender power to Moshood K.O. Abiola, widely believed to have won the annulled 1993 presidential election.
NEWS
April 26, 1998 | Associated Press
By the millions, Nigerians didn't vote Saturday in legislative elections billed as the first step toward ending the country's military rule. Opponents of Gen. Sani Abacha's military regime urged voters to stay away to show disapproval of his presidential nomination by all five political parties. They accuse Abacha of manipulating both the presidential nomination process and the legislative elections.
NEWS
April 21, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
With his candidacy still undeclared, Gen. Sani Abacha apparently ensured a victory at presidential polls set for Aug. 1 by winning the nomination of the fifth of five government-sanctioned political parties. The Grassroots Democratic Movement chose him in a vote in the northeastern town of Maiduguri. But armed riot police were called in to quell shouts of "We don't want cheating! We don't want Abacha!"
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