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Sanibel Island

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TRAVEL
February 27, 2005 | Arthur Frommer, Special to The Times
Sanibel ISLAND, off southwestern Florida, has changed. Many of the pines along its 4 1/2 -mile main street, Periwinkle Way, were destroyed by Hurricane Charley last year. If you have never been to this vacation gem, you won't know the difference. And although you'll see fallen trees and shrubs along the side streets and marshlands, you'll find Sanibel's white-sand beaches unaltered, picturesque and strewn with more seashells than you'll probably find anywhere else in America.
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NEWS
November 1, 2013 | By Anne Harnagel
Here's an entertaining spring cruise from Smithsonian Journeys that focuses on Florida's natural beauty, historic sites, wildlife and cultural charms. After embarking in Tampa, Fla., the 130-passenger ship Yorktown will sail around the Florida peninsula. Stops will include Sarasota and the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, Sanibel Island, Key Largo and Key West, Miami and Villa Vizcaya, a full-day excursion to Everglades National Park, Palm Beach, the Kennedy Space Center, St. Augustine, Amelia and Cumberland islands, and Savannah.
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TRAVEL
May 23, 1993
The Sanibel Island article ("Birdlands," May 2) was superbly written and illustrated. By coincidence, I had attended a family reunion in Ft. Myers, Fla., the previous February, and visited all places mentioned, beginning with sunrise on Sanibel Island. We went birding and shelling in utter contentment. John D. MacDonald once wrote that the only way to stop time is to experience joy. Your article recalled those moments. EVELYN C. WEBER Los Alamitos
TRAVEL
February 27, 2005 | Arthur Frommer, Special to The Times
Sanibel ISLAND, off southwestern Florida, has changed. Many of the pines along its 4 1/2 -mile main street, Periwinkle Way, were destroyed by Hurricane Charley last year. If you have never been to this vacation gem, you won't know the difference. And although you'll see fallen trees and shrubs along the side streets and marshlands, you'll find Sanibel's white-sand beaches unaltered, picturesque and strewn with more seashells than you'll probably find anywhere else in America.
NEWS
November 1, 2013 | By Anne Harnagel
Here's an entertaining spring cruise from Smithsonian Journeys that focuses on Florida's natural beauty, historic sites, wildlife and cultural charms. After embarking in Tampa, Fla., the 130-passenger ship Yorktown will sail around the Florida peninsula. Stops will include Sarasota and the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, Sanibel Island, Key Largo and Key West, Miami and Villa Vizcaya, a full-day excursion to Everglades National Park, Palm Beach, the Kennedy Space Center, St. Augustine, Amelia and Cumberland islands, and Savannah.
NEWS
April 1, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER
All along the dazzling white sand beaches embracing this 14-mile-long, 2-mile-wide southwest Florida island, men and women, boys and girls are bent over picking up seashells. From dawn to dusk, all one sees dotting the beaches are derrieres. They call it the "Sanibel stoop." This island is a mecca for seashell collectors, the seashell capital of America.
TRAVEL
May 2, 1993 | ANNE WHITEHOUSE, Whitehouse is a New York City-based free-lance writer. and
When my husband's grandfather first visited Sanibel Island in the late 1940s, he arrived by ferry, over three miles of shallow, blue-green waters, from near Ft. Myers on the mainland. There were only two places to stay on the island, guest houses where the accommodations were simple and rustic. Meals were served at set times, and there was a choice of one or two entrees, usually a local fish.
TRAVEL
December 1, 2002 | Susan Spano, Times Staff Writer
Seen on the beach here: Florida fighting conchs, sand dollars, tapering lightning whelks, calico scallops, spiky murexes, kitten's paws, all abundant and free for the taking, assuming the little critters these shells once housed have moved on. Shells may be hard to find on other beaches, but they wash ashore in piles on Sanibel and Captiva, two slender barrier islands connected by a bridge off the west coast of Florida.
TRAVEL
December 15, 2002
"Florida's Treasure Islands" (Dec. 1) was delightful. I grew up in Coral Gables, Fla., during the '50s and '60s, and my family visited Sanibel and Captiva islands before a bridge from the mainland existed. We were ferried over. Then Sanibel had one plain motel, an even plainer wood general store, lots of sand -- and tons of shells. Ted Nicholas Indian Wells, Calif.
NEWS
September 19, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Tropical Depression Gordon drenched parts of the Southeast but did little to offset the region's long-running drought, with torrential rains running off the parched ground. The former hurricane caused scattered flooding, roof damage and power outages across Florida, but no deaths. It produced little more than hard rain as it streamed across Georgia and up the East Coast into North Carolina. But 200 miles south of the Keys, on Sanibel Island, damage was estimated at more than $1 million.
TRAVEL
December 15, 2002
"Florida's Treasure Islands" (Dec. 1) was delightful. I grew up in Coral Gables, Fla., during the '50s and '60s, and my family visited Sanibel and Captiva islands before a bridge from the mainland existed. We were ferried over. Then Sanibel had one plain motel, an even plainer wood general store, lots of sand -- and tons of shells. Ted Nicholas Indian Wells, Calif.
TRAVEL
December 1, 2002 | Susan Spano, Times Staff Writer
Seen on the beach here: Florida fighting conchs, sand dollars, tapering lightning whelks, calico scallops, spiky murexes, kitten's paws, all abundant and free for the taking, assuming the little critters these shells once housed have moved on. Shells may be hard to find on other beaches, but they wash ashore in piles on Sanibel and Captiva, two slender barrier islands connected by a bridge off the west coast of Florida.
TRAVEL
May 23, 1993
The Sanibel Island article ("Birdlands," May 2) was superbly written and illustrated. By coincidence, I had attended a family reunion in Ft. Myers, Fla., the previous February, and visited all places mentioned, beginning with sunrise on Sanibel Island. We went birding and shelling in utter contentment. John D. MacDonald once wrote that the only way to stop time is to experience joy. Your article recalled those moments. EVELYN C. WEBER Los Alamitos
TRAVEL
May 2, 1993 | ANNE WHITEHOUSE, Whitehouse is a New York City-based free-lance writer. and
When my husband's grandfather first visited Sanibel Island in the late 1940s, he arrived by ferry, over three miles of shallow, blue-green waters, from near Ft. Myers on the mainland. There were only two places to stay on the island, guest houses where the accommodations were simple and rustic. Meals were served at set times, and there was a choice of one or two entrees, usually a local fish.
NEWS
April 1, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER
All along the dazzling white sand beaches embracing this 14-mile-long, 2-mile-wide southwest Florida island, men and women, boys and girls are bent over picking up seashells. From dawn to dusk, all one sees dotting the beaches are derrieres. They call it the "Sanibel stoop." This island is a mecca for seashell collectors, the seashell capital of America.
NATIONAL
July 24, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A professional landscaper died after being mauled by a 12-foot alligator that dragged her into a pond and nearly tore off an arm as rescuers engaged in a tug of war. Janie Melsek, 54, was attacked by the alligator as she worked on landscaping behind a home on Sanibel Island, just off the Florida coast in the Gulf of Mexico. She died in surgery at Lee Memorial Hospital to treat an infection caused by the reptile's vicious bites.
SPORTS
January 14, 1989
At 16, Michael Chang of Placentia will be the youngest player to represent the United States in Davis Cup competition when he steps on the court against Paraguay next month. The Davis Cup event will be held at Sanibel Island, Fla., Feb. 3-5. Chang will not turn 17 until Feb. 22. Previously, the youngest U.S. player was Aaron Krickstein, who was 17 years 5 months when he competed in the 1985 Davis Cup.
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