Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSanitation Districts
IN THE NEWS

Sanitation Districts

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1996 | DEBRA CANO
The Orange County Sanitation Districts has agreed to settle wrongful death claims with the families of two men killed in a fire two years ago at its Huntington Beach sewage treatment plant. Cynthia Hafif, a Claremont attorney representing the families, said that none of the parties has signed a final agreement, but that the sanitation agency has offered an undisclosed amount of money and that the families have accepted it.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2010 | By Louis Sahagun
Los Angeles and Orange counties' sanitation districts have petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court to rule that a voter-approved ban on dumping processed human waste in Kern County violates federal interstate commerce laws. The petition aims to abolish a ballot initiative overwhelmingly approved by Kern County voters in 2006 that makes it a misdemeanor to dump treated wastes known as biosolids on unincorporated county land. The ban effectively ending shipments of treated waste from Southern California.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1996 | SHELBY GRAD
The Sanitation Districts of Orange County has withdrawn its proposal to buy the county's landfill system for $300 million after the Board of Supervisors gave the offer a cool reception. The districts' board of directors took the action Wednesday night, a week after an agency subcommittee recommended that the deal be scrapped. The county and the districts had been negotiating on a possible sale of the landfills for about four months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2007 | J. Michael Kennedy, Times Staff Writer
In the realm of big fines for doing bad things to the land, this was supposed to have been a $4-million whopper. The Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts, a partnership of 24 independent special districts, was prepared to pay that amount after years of negotiation to cover environmental damage done in the Antelope Valley cities of Palmdale and Lancaster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1994 | DANIELLE A. FOUQUETTE
Officials with the Sanitation Districts of Orange County have sent a letter to each member city and agency, asking them to voluntarily reduce the number of representatives they send to agency meetings. The Sanitation Districts could save $36,000 a year if each city complied with the request, but officials said it was intended not to save money but to streamline the organization. Each representative is paid a set amount for every meeting attended.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1994 | DEBRA CANO
About 30 employees of the Orange County Sanitation Districts picketed in front of the agency's Ellis Avenue plant Tuesday to express their dissatisfaction with the lack of progress in contract negotiations. Operations and maintenance workers carried placards and took personal leave time to demonstrate for about two hours. Workers' three-year contracts expired last November.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1995 | SHELBY GRAD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday to enter exclusive talks with the Sanitation Districts of Orange County over the possible sale of the county's landfill system, valued at more than $200 million. The 4-1 vote came two weeks after the board deadlocked on the issue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1996 | SHELBY GRAD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Setting the stage for a mammoth sale of government property, the county sanitation board voted Wednesday to bid $300 million for Orange County's landfill system. The deal would mark by far the largest sale of county assets to date in its effort to recover from bankruptcy. "It's the best option for the citizens of Orange County in terms of cost and stewardship," said Blake Anderson, assistant general manager of the Sanitation Districts of Orange County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1992
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the state Regional Water Quality Control Board filed suit in San Francisco on Monday against the Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts for violating federal standards on secondary treatment of waste water at its plant in Carson. The sanitation districts now treat effluent at an advanced primary level, a step below requirements of the Clean Water Act, said Lois Grunwald, an EPA spokeswoman.
NEWS
February 17, 1995
The Sanitation Districts of Orange County are demanding that Orange County immediately return $9.2 million in investment proceeds that sanitation officials maintain were held in a separate fund, and not in the county's now-bankrupt investment pool. Sanitation officials, in a recent letter to county supervisors, contend that the $9.2 million was generated by the sale of $100 million in securities owned by the districts. Sanitation officials allege that Smith Barney, Harris, Upham & Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2004 | Jean O. Pasco, Times Staff Writer
In an effort to better cleanse urban runoff that for years has fouled coastal waters, Orange County Sanitation District officials are proposing a countywide user fee to fund a $25-million cleanup effort. The fee would be among the first in California charged directly to property owners for the costs of treating urban runoff. The Los Angeles City Council on July 20 authorized a November ballot measure to approve a $500-million bond to fund a variety of runoff pollution projects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2004 | Tom Gorman, Times Staff Writer
The Orange County Sanitation District is studying how much water runoff from lawns and streets can be treated before it ends up in the Santa Ana River and ocean. The challenge, sanitation district officials say, is processing additional runoff without jeopardizing its primary mission of treating raw sewage. The district processes about 2 million gallons of runoff daily during the dry season but can treat about 10 million gallons a day, General Manager Blake Anderson said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2003 | Dan Weikel, Times Staff Writer
Unable to agree after almost six hours of public testimony and debate, operators of Orange County's largest sewer system early Thursday postponed deciding whether to increase rates for hundreds of thousands of homes, businesses and institutions. Before a seesaw discussion ended at 12:40 a.m., the Orange County Sanitation District Board of Directors could not muster the two-thirds majority needed to double rates over five years, nor pass a compromise motion that would have boosted fees 15%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2002 | JEAN O. PASCO and SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Orange County Sanitation District is considering a controversial legal strategy aimed at protecting the agency against lawsuits as it moves to fully treat sewage dumped into the ocean. Under the plan, discussed by the district board Wednesday night, the Environmental Protection Agency would preemptively file suit against the district, alleging violation of federal clean water laws.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2002 | SEEMA MEHTA and JEAN O. PASCO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
By one vote, the Orange County Sanitation District late Wednesday opted to abandon a federal waiver that allows it to release into the ocean dirtier sewage than nearly all of the nation's 16,000 other sewer agencies. In doing so, the district agreed to comply with the requirements of the federal Clean Water Act.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2002 | JEAN O. PASCO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County Board of Supervisors joined a coalition of cities and environmentalists Tuesday in urging sanitation district officials to perform greater treatment of sewage dumped into the Pacific Ocean. The move came a day before the Orange County Sanitation District takes its pivotal vote on the treatment issue. The district's 25-member board will decide tonight whether to seek another five-year waiver allowing it to bypass requirements of the federal Clean Water Act.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2002 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Supervisor Jim Silva wants his colleagues next week to urge the Orange County Sanitation District to fully treat the waste water it dumps into the Pacific Ocean. Silva's decision comes amid mounting pressure against renewal of a federal waiver that allows the sanitation district to dump 243 million gallons of partially treated waste into the ocean per day. The sanitation district's five-year waiver is up next year.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|