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Sanjay Dutt

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2011 | By Kevin Thomas, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Double Dhamaal" — "Fun" in Hindi — features four goofy unemployed guys so desperate to strike it rich they will do just about anything to grab some cash. They are Adi (Arshad Warsi), Manav (Jaaved Jaaferi), Roy (Riteish Deshmukh) and Boman (Ashish Chowdhry), and they could easily be called the Four Stooges. The four hard-working comedians, director Indra Kumar and writer Tushar Hiranandani are awe-inspiring in their sheer stamina and seemingly inexhaustible energy in sustaining a 138-minute running time that by Hollywood standards is about 50 minutes too long for comedy but is typical for Bollywood.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2011 | By Kevin Thomas, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Double Dhamaal" — "Fun" in Hindi — features four goofy unemployed guys so desperate to strike it rich they will do just about anything to grab some cash. They are Adi (Arshad Warsi), Manav (Jaaved Jaaferi), Roy (Riteish Deshmukh) and Boman (Ashish Chowdhry), and they could easily be called the Four Stooges. The four hard-working comedians, director Indra Kumar and writer Tushar Hiranandani are awe-inspiring in their sheer stamina and seemingly inexhaustible energy in sustaining a 138-minute running time that by Hollywood standards is about 50 minutes too long for comedy but is typical for Bollywood.
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NEWS
July 15, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now playing: a real-life, multimillion-dollar horror show for the Indian film industry, starring one of its biggest names. The drama's ending will tell a great deal about how justice is administered in this country, and may reveal who was behind one of the most diabolical terrorist attacks in Indian history. Earlier this month, a Bombay judge sent Sanjay Dutt, the country's muscular, home-grown answer to Bruce Willis and Sylvester Stallone, back to jail, revoking his bail.
WORLD
August 11, 2007 | Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writer
It's hard to miss Sanjay Dutt's famously grizzled face on the Indian landscape. One of the country's most popular movie stars, Dutt's hound-dog looks adorn billboards and the backs of city buses, plugging products from steel beams to underwear. At 48, he has made more than 100 movies, with another on the way next month, and his evolution from Bollywood wayward son to lovable middle-aged rogue has made him a staple of India's celebrity-obsessed newspapers and TV shows.
WORLD
August 11, 2007 | Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writer
It's hard to miss Sanjay Dutt's famously grizzled face on the Indian landscape. One of the country's most popular movie stars, Dutt's hound-dog looks adorn billboards and the backs of city buses, plugging products from steel beams to underwear. At 48, he has made more than 100 movies, with another on the way next month, and his evolution from Bollywood wayward son to lovable middle-aged rogue has made him a staple of India's celebrity-obsessed newspapers and TV shows.
WORLD
August 23, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Indian actor Sanjay Dutt walked out of prison on bail early today after 22 days behind bars, a prison official said. Dutt was released early to avoid crowds gathered since Monday, when India's Supreme Court ordered his temporary release on a technicality. The actor was sentenced to six years July 31 for illegal possession of weapons supplied by men convicted of involvement in the 1993 Mumbai bomb blasts that killed 257 people.
WORLD
August 21, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
India's Supreme Court released Bollywood star Sanjay Dutt on bail, citing a technicality weeks after he was convicted of illegally possessing guns linked to 1993 bombings in Mumbai, Dutt's lawyer said. Dutt received bail because the Mumbai court that convicted him had not yet provided him with a copy of his sentence, said his lawyer, Surender Singh. Five other people convicted in the same case also were granted bail on the same technicality.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2007 | John Anderson, Special to The Times
Maybe it's the trains. Maybe it's the camels. Maybe it's the intermission. No matter: Something about "Eklavya: The Royal Guard" suggests a lost film by David Lean. With some muted echoes of "Hamlet." And a whiff of "Rigoletto." Like so many Indian movies that make their way to Los Angeles, "Eklavya" -- based on the low-caste warrior hero of "The Mahabharata" -- is a movie masala.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2002 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
Ready for a singing and dancing "Reservoir Dogs"? That's what the makers of "Kaante" are hoping India's mass audience is eager to see, and while the Hindi-speaking film industry is looking to the much-delayed movie to give it a boost, it shouldn't count on any crossover appeal. On home ground, however, "Kaante," which translates as "thorn," as in "a thorn in the side," could conceivably connect with its roster of top male stars and mix of violence, schmaltz, fervid songs and flashy imitation of Hollywood crime melodramas.
WORLD
March 21, 2013 | By Mark Magnier
NEW DELHI -- India's lumbering legal system delivered its final verdict Thursday in a 1993 serial bombing attack in Mumbai that killed 257 people and injured 700, upholding the death penalty for one of the accused masterminds and reducing to life in prison from death the sentences against 10 others. The 10 don't deserve execution because they were pawns in the plot, the Supreme Court ruled about two decades after the deadliest terrorist attack in India's history. The court blamed Pakistan's Inter-Services Intelligence spy agency for training the attackers and providing them with weapons, an accusation Pakistan has long denied.
NEWS
July 15, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now playing: a real-life, multimillion-dollar horror show for the Indian film industry, starring one of its biggest names. The drama's ending will tell a great deal about how justice is administered in this country, and may reveal who was behind one of the most diabolical terrorist attacks in Indian history. Earlier this month, a Bombay judge sent Sanjay Dutt, the country's muscular, home-grown answer to Bruce Willis and Sylvester Stallone, back to jail, revoking his bail.
WORLD
April 16, 2009 | Mark Magnier and Pavitra Ramaswamy
Voting in the world's most populous democracy kicks off today, featuring hundreds of political parties, aging leaders and a colorful cast of Bollywood and cricket stars offering themselves up for the yea or nay of the masses. An estimated 714 million people -- more than twice the population of the United States -- are eligible to vote in India's monthlong, rolling election.
NEWS
November 4, 2001 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Taliban soldiers were ruthlessly efficient in their destruction of the Parwan Cinema, except for the fragments of fantasies they left scattered on the projection room floor. Two years later, the torn bits of movies--the blasphemous idolatry the Taliban thought it had wiped out for eternity--survive as the only reminder of a time when the people of Charikar could sit in rows of metal chairs, stare at a flickering screen and dream.
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