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Sansei

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1999
In his review of the play "The Summer Moon" (" 'Summer Moon' Eclipses the Realities of Life," Nov. 8), Michael Phillips describes the character Rosie Yoshida (played by Tamlyn Tomita) as a nisei, which means second-generation Japanese American. But the review then goes on to say that the character's father was born in the United States. The Japanese American community counts the immigrant generation as a family's first generation, or issei. So, the nisei are the children of Japanese immigrants.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2001 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The latest in Jude Narita's rich canon of one-woman shows, "With Darkness Behind Us, Daylight Has Come," at Highways, takes on the heft and poignancy of oral history, much as did Narita's 1987 solo turn, "Coming Into Passion/Song for a Sansei." While "Sansei" beautifully explored differences between Japanese-born Americans and their Westernized offspring, "Darkness" takes on one specific subject--the experiences of Japanese American women interned by the U.S. government during World War II.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1989
In response to Bill Shinkai's March 26 letter: He alleges "Taper paternalism toward Asian-Americans." That has not been our experience during the development of the stage production "Sansei." The Taper's Gordon Davidson has given us tremendous support without tampering with the integrity of the piece. Secondly, "Sansei" is based on the lives of four members of the Hiroshima band, with the text culled from taped interviews and discussions that were edited (not written as Shinkai assumes)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1999
In his review of the play "The Summer Moon" (" 'Summer Moon' Eclipses the Realities of Life," Nov. 8), Michael Phillips describes the character Rosie Yoshida (played by Tamlyn Tomita) as a nisei, which means second-generation Japanese American. But the review then goes on to say that the character's father was born in the United States. The Japanese American community counts the immigrant generation as a family's first generation, or issei. So, the nisei are the children of Japanese immigrants.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1992
I would like to make a clarification regarding your reference to the Taper's 1989 production of "Sansei" as having been "Asian-inspired" but "written and directed by Anglo-Americans." Although the Taper continues to describe "Sansei" in that manner, the production in fact was based on the lives of four native Angelenos--June Okida Kuramoto, Johnny Mori, Danny Yamamoto and myself. Collectively, we are the nucleus of the band Hiroshima. The director and catalyst of "Sansei" was Taper Associate Artistic Director Robert Egan, who along with others on the Taper staff edited hours and hours of interviews and discussions with the four of us. That became the basis of the text.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1989
Gordon Davidson's contention that the jazz-fusion band Hiroshima's box-office potential makes it less of an economic risk than a play by an unknown Asian-American writer is not surprising ("Hiroshima--Music, Drama in a Taper Play," March 12). It is also not surprising that even given Hiroshima's clout, Davidson went with an unknown Anglo-American writer (not an Asian-American) to develop the story of third-generation Japanese-Americans, Sansei. This is consistent with his, and the Taper's, paternalistic attitude toward Asian-Americans.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2001 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The latest in Jude Narita's rich canon of one-woman shows, "With Darkness Behind Us, Daylight Has Come," at Highways, takes on the heft and poignancy of oral history, much as did Narita's 1987 solo turn, "Coming Into Passion/Song for a Sansei." While "Sansei" beautifully explored differences between Japanese-born Americans and their Westernized offspring, "Darkness" takes on one specific subject--the experiences of Japanese American women interned by the U.S. government during World War II.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1989
Watching stage critic Dan Sullivan and Mark Taper Forum executive Gordon Davison duke it out in The Times is like watching two white guys go one on one in basketball because they own the court (Sullivan's Jan. 8 "And a Humbug in a Pear Tree" and Davison's Jan. 22 letter). Come on, Calendar, aren't there any non-white reviewers on your staff? Does Kevin Thomas have to review every Japanese film? Come on, Gordon, are the only blacks on your staff the janitor and receptionist?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1988 | SYLVIE DRAKE
Onto the dimly lit stage--black floor, black walls--ambles a tall young woman: dark, penetrating eyes, sharply limned features, jet-black hair. In one hand she carries bottled water, in the other a paperback book. The title--hard to decipher--is Susan Brownmiller's "Against Our Will: Men, Women and Rape." She stops. Her gaze wanders over the audience, assessing it as it might the ripeness of a melon. Then she moves on, settling on a cot at the opposite side of the stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1987 | JANICE ARKATOV
Meet the many faces of Jude Narita. In the course of her one-hour, one-woman show, "Coming Into Passion/Song for a Sansei" (at the Fountain through Sept. 13), she introduces us to five characters with diverse personalities: funny, sad, hip, docile, brash, noble--and some who are all of the above.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1992
I would like to make a clarification regarding your reference to the Taper's 1989 production of "Sansei" as having been "Asian-inspired" but "written and directed by Anglo-Americans." Although the Taper continues to describe "Sansei" in that manner, the production in fact was based on the lives of four native Angelenos--June Okida Kuramoto, Johnny Mori, Danny Yamamoto and myself. Collectively, we are the nucleus of the band Hiroshima. The director and catalyst of "Sansei" was Taper Associate Artistic Director Robert Egan, who along with others on the Taper staff edited hours and hours of interviews and discussions with the four of us. That became the basis of the text.
BOOKS
April 28, 1991 | Karl Taro Greenfeld, Greenfeld was born in Kobe, Japan, of a Japanese mother and an American father. He grew up in Pacific Palisades and currently resides in Tokyo, where he is managing editor of Tokyo Journal
For second- and third-generation Japanese Americans--Nissei and Sansei--returning to Japan can be frightening, educating and enlightening. For Japanese-American writers, that experience is essential to understanding how our cultural heritage differs from that of other American writers. We came of age in America, often of middle-class and upper-middle-class backgrounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1989
In response to Bill Shinkai's March 26 letter: He alleges "Taper paternalism toward Asian-Americans." That has not been our experience during the development of the stage production "Sansei." The Taper's Gordon Davidson has given us tremendous support without tampering with the integrity of the piece. Secondly, "Sansei" is based on the lives of four members of the Hiroshima band, with the text culled from taped interviews and discussions that were edited (not written as Shinkai assumes)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1989 | DON SHIRLEY
Examine the credits for "Sansei" at the Mark Taper Forum. It was "created and performed by" Hiroshima, the band that is its subject. It was "developed and directed by" Robert Egan. The dramaturg was Brian Kulick. But no one wrote it. "Sansei" was drawn from taped reminiscences by four members of Hiroshima. The raw material was edited into a script, a collaboration between the members of the band and Egan.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1989
Gordon Davidson's contention that the jazz-fusion band Hiroshima's box-office potential makes it less of an economic risk than a play by an unknown Asian-American writer is not surprising ("Hiroshima--Music, Drama in a Taper Play," March 12). It is also not surprising that even given Hiroshima's clout, Davidson went with an unknown Anglo-American writer (not an Asian-American) to develop the story of third-generation Japanese-Americans, Sansei. This is consistent with his, and the Taper's, paternalistic attitude toward Asian-Americans.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
Four Japanese-American teen-agers come to terms with ethnic stereotypes and '70s social change in the late Warren Sumio Kubota's "Webster Street Blues," newly opened at East West Players. "It's about the relationship of four Sansei: third-generation Japanese-Americans," said actress Nobu McCarthy, who's directing. "It's set in the Japanese community in San Francisco in 1972. So it's contemporary, but not up to date.
NEWS
March 13, 1989 | KEVIN ALLMAN
Saturday night's benefit performance of "Sansei," an original musical theater piece by the jazz-fusion band Hiroshima, was chosen for a first at the Music Center--the first major public event hosted by the Asian American Friends of Center Theatre Group, a pan-Asian support group for the Mark Taper Forum and the Ahmanson Theatre. The AAF, organized in 1986, is working to increase Asian involvement at the Music Center, and involves Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Filipino and Southeast Asian members.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
Four Japanese-American teen-agers come to terms with ethnic stereotypes and '70s social change in the late Warren Sumio Kubota's "Webster Street Blues," newly opened at East West Players. "It's about the relationship of four Sansei: third-generation Japanese-Americans," said actress Nobu McCarthy, who's directing. "It's set in the Japanese community in San Francisco in 1972. So it's contemporary, but not up to date.
NEWS
March 13, 1989 | KEVIN ALLMAN
Saturday night's benefit performance of "Sansei," an original musical theater piece by the jazz-fusion band Hiroshima, was chosen for a first at the Music Center--the first major public event hosted by the Asian American Friends of Center Theatre Group, a pan-Asian support group for the Mark Taper Forum and the Ahmanson Theatre. The AAF, organized in 1986, is working to increase Asian involvement at the Music Center, and involves Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Filipino and Southeast Asian members.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1989 | DENNIS HUNT
Dan Kuramoto, leader of the Japanese-American band Hiroshima, interrupted his discussion of the group's latest project--the play "Sansei," which begins previews tonight--to have a panic attack. "We're out of our territory," said Kuramoto, 41, looking frazzled after rushing crosstown to this restaurant interview following a play rehearsal. "We're musicians. And we're about to open at the Mark Taper Forum in a play? Sometimes I wonder what the hell we're doing."
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