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Sansum Clinic

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NEWS
April 7, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A research clinic in Santa Barbara has entered into an agreement to import fetal tissue from Russia to transplant into diabetics. The agreement by the Sansum Clinic reflects U.S. researchers' frustrations over difficulties in obtaining fetal tissue for research purposes, despite President Clinton's recent lifting of a moratorium on the use of such tissue. This is the first agreement of its kind between U.S. researchers and Russian authorities.
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NEWS
April 7, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A research clinic in Santa Barbara has entered into an agreement to import fetal tissue from Russia to transplant into diabetics. The agreement by the Sansum Clinic reflects U.S. researchers' frustrations over difficulties in obtaining fetal tissue for research purposes, despite President Clinton's recent lifting of a moratorium on the use of such tissue. This is the first agreement of its kind between U.S. researchers and Russian authorities.
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MAGAZINE
May 5, 1991
Although our name was incorrect in "The Disappearing Doctor," we found much that was familiar. Increasing pressure on physicians to minimize services that may be medically necessary is why our 74 internists and specialists have chosen not to participate in HMOs, PPOs and other managed care programs. BRUCE A. BERLOW, M.D. SANSUM MEDICAL CLINIC Santa Barbara The magazine regrets the misspelling of Sansum.
NEWS
February 4, 1988
Robert A. Nelson has been appointed administrator of the Long Beach-based Harriman Jones Medical Clinic, one of the oldest and largest multi-specialty medical groups in California with 55 physicians caring for more than 50,000 patients at five locations in Long Beach and one clinic in Seal Beach. Nelson has been executive director of the Sansum Medical Clinic in Santa Barbara and the Friendly Hills Medical Group in La Habra.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1999 | MASSIE RITSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The chunks of earth got curious looks Friday as they were wheeled through the clinic with flashing cameras in tow. Inside the sterile and pastel-colored CAT scan lab, a technician recorded the patient's name in a computer: Arlington Springs Woman. Her age: 13,000 years old. Scientists interested in the remains of an ancient woman who lived on the Channel Islands made certain Friday that two thigh bones are all they have to reconstruct a life lived at the end of the last major ice age.
NEWS
July 28, 1987 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
If you're a tennis player who thinks a game of doubles is healthful aerobic exercise, you're fooling yourself, a new study says. In fact, playing golf without an electric cart is better cardiovascular exercise. According to the study by a sports medicine researcher, who matched cardiovascular effects of singles and doubles players, a doubles game provides only half the benefit of a singles game.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1990 | KATHLEEN DOHENY, Doheny is a free-lance health writer living in Burbank
A new surgical technique to repair carpal tunnel syndrome--the painful wrist problem that afflicts typists, laborers and others whose jobs involve repetitive hand motions--can speed the return to work by about three weeks, a Sacramento surgeon reported last week at a meeting of physicians in Toronto. But some surgeons are taking a wait-and-see approach to the new surgery, saying they are worried that the risks may outweigh the benefits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1999 | MASSIE RITSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The chunks of earth got curious looks Friday as they were wheeled through the clinic with flashing cameras in tow. Inside the sterile and pastel-colored CAT scan lab, a technician recorded the patient's name in a computer: Arlington Springs Woman. Her age: 13,000 years old. Scientists interested in the remains of an ancient woman who lived on the Channel Islands made certain Friday that two thigh bones are all they have to reconstruct a life lived at the end of the last major ice age.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2013 | By Lisa Zamosky
When David Brutman received a $3,000 bill for his wife's colonoscopy, he was angry and confused. He thought the cost would all be covered because under the Affordable Care Act most insurers must cover the full cost of preventive care such as check-ups, vaccinations and screenings. It seemed straightforward enough, yet Brutman, a 41-year-old Silicon Valley entrepreneur, learned the hard way that the lines are easily blurred when it comes to determining whether services are considered preventive care or treatments that require payment.
NEWS
April 4, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Mary Arthur celebrated a milestone this year. She has no pancreas, but Arthur has needed no insulin injections for three years. The reason: a radical new procedure called an islet-cell transplant. It is the longest anyone has survived and remained insulin free with such an implant. Arthur became diabetic as a 15-year-old high-school sophomore when her pancreas--which secretes life-preserving insulin--was removed along with her liver and stomach during cancer surgery.
HEALTH
December 1, 2008 | Marnell Jameson, Jameson is a freelance writer.
While not every stress reduction technique suits everyone, any incremental change -- a little more exercise, a little more sleep, a little deep breathing and a few more nights out with friends -- will help. -- Get moving Evolution has conditioned us to respond to stress as a physical threat, which is why our bodies produce hormones that prepare us to flee from trouble or fight back physically.
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