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Santa Ana Ca Budget

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1990 | LILY ENG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing an increase in gang violence and homicides, Santa Ana City Councilman Richards L. Norton said Wednesday that he wants to ask voters in November to support a special property tax that would add 20 police officers to the city's 351-member department. "We're losing the battle on the streets," Norton said, "and the bad guys are winning."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1998 | HOPE HAMASHIGE
As they did last year, residents said they plan to question whether the city's proposed budget, the subject of a hearing Monday, conforms with Proposition 218. The ballot measure limited the ability of local governments to raise taxes by requiring resident approval of fee increases and how the money is used. Ed McKie, president of the French Court Neighborhood Assn., said he will again question the use of sanitation funds for graffiti removal, weed abatement and tree costs.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1997 | JEFF KASS
The City Council approved a new budget this week, though members were divided, with some wanting more money for streets and parks while others favored polishing Santa Ana's image with projects such as the Artists Village. The spending plan, which projects revenue of $257 million for fiscal 1997-98, passed on a 5-2 vote Monday, with Councilmen Ted R. Moreno and Tony Espinoza dissenting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1997 | JEFF KASS
The City Council approved a new budget this week, though members were divided, with some wanting more money for streets and parks while others favored polishing Santa Ana's image with projects such as the Artists Village. The spending plan, which projects revenue of $257 million for fiscal 1997-98, passed on a 5-2 vote Monday, with Councilmen Ted R. Moreno and Tony Espinoza dissenting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1996 | KIMBERLY BROWER
Trustees of the county's largest school district approved an annual spending plan this week that is smaller than the current budget but continues funding for most programs. Santa Ana Unified's $239-million budget for the 1996-97 school year retains spending for special education and a regional occupational program, but designates no additional funds to accommodate a growing student population.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1996 | JEFF KASS
Residents and businesses would see some fee increases, and 30 city positions would be eliminated under the budget being proposed for fiscal 1996-97. The $120-million budget plan, presented for the first time at a City Council study session last week, would take steps to close a projected $10-million deficit caused by revenue losses, including a $1-million drop in property taxes because of declining values.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1994 | JON NALICK
City officials have unveiled a preliminary 1994-95 budget that calls for the elimination of 26 employee positions, the sale of a $5-million reservoir and small increases in a wide range of fees. During a study session on Monday, City Manager David N. Ream said the steps are necessary to offset a potential $15-million deficit brought on by the continuing poor economy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1993 | JON NALICK
A projected $19-million shortfall in the next fiscal year may force the city to increase fees and lay off as many as 84 employees, according to the city manager's preliminary budget report. Designed as a starting point for budget discussions, the report blames the state's continuing financial difficulties for a decrease in revenue and warns that additional state reductions could require even deeper cuts locally. The City Council, which received the report from City Manager David N.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1990 | LILY ENG and GREG HERNANDEZ
Despite two months of study and debate, the City Council is still wrangling over the city's $218-million budget because contracts with the police and fire unions have not been settled. Santa Ana is the largest city in the county without a final 1990-91 budget at hand. The council missed its own deadline last month for passing the budget. The city councils of Irvine and Westminster have not passed final budgets either. "We're being held hostage by the contracts," said Mayor Daniel H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1990 | GREG HERNANDEZ
After months of delays, study and debate, the City Council on Tuesday finally passed its $218-million budget for the 1990-91 fiscal year. The budget, which emphasizes a beefed-up police force to battle gang activity, was unveiled by City Manager David N. Ream in May, but final adoption had been postponed six times throughout the summer. "I think it's long overdue," said Councilman Daniel E. Griset. "We've had a city without a budget for two months."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1997 | JEFF KASS
As city officials begin considering a budget for fiscal 1997-98, some residents are questioning whether the $140-million spending plan conforms with Proposition 218, approved last fall by voters statewide. The November ballot measure limits the ability of local governments to raise taxes by requiring residents to approve fee increases and to designate specifically how the money is to be used.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1996 | KIMBERLY BROWER
Trustees of the county's largest school district approved an annual spending plan this week that is smaller than the current budget but continues funding for most programs. Santa Ana Unified's $239-million budget for the 1996-97 school year retains spending for special education and a regional occupational program, but designates no additional funds to accommodate a growing student population.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1996 | JEFF KASS
After an acrimonious debate about the city's trash hauling contract, the City Council Monday night approved a $124-million general fund budget for fiscal 1996-97. Many of the two dozen speakers at the meeting, including representatives of competing trash companies, opposed a 12-year contract with Great Western Reclamation, the city's current trash hauler, arguing that the city should seek bids for the $20-million-a-year contract.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1996 | JEFF KASS
Residents and businesses would see some fee increases, and 30 city positions would be eliminated under the budget being proposed for fiscal 1996-97. The $120-million budget plan, presented for the first time at a City Council study session last week, would take steps to close a projected $10-million deficit caused by revenue losses, including a $1-million drop in property taxes because of declining values.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1994 | JON NALICK
The City Council has approved a $279.5-million budget for the 1994-95 fiscal year that calls for new building plan fees and the elimination of 26 employee positions. The spending plan also includes a $12.9-million deficit, which will be made up mostly by one-time revenues such as the sale of a $5-million city reservoir, said Rod Coloma, executive director of finance and management services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1994 | JON NALICK
Public works officials this week unveiled plans to spend $37.8 million next fiscal year on street, sewer and park improvements. The plan calls for spending more than $20.2 million to improve traffic. Almost $12 million of that money will be spend to widen Bristol Street between Edinger and McFadden avenues. That is the city's highest-priority transportation project, and it is expected to speed traffic and reduce congestion through the area, said transportation analyst Manuel Gomez.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1990 | LILY ENG
Citing a commitment to battle gang activity in Santa Ana, City Manager David N. Ream unveiled a $218-million budget Monday that emphasized hiring more police to patrol the city's neighborhoods. "We see gang prevention as one of the top priorities in the city," Ream said. Under the budget, the Police Department would add six investigators to its narcotics unit and four to its gang unit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1993 | JON NALICK
The City Council has unanimously approved its 1993-94 budget, including $19 million in cuts and increased fees. The $121.7-million budget, which the council approved Monday after months of public discussion, calls for staff reductions in police, fire and virtually every other department. The council rejected a cable television tax and a recommendation to close the McFadden Branch Library. "To see a 7-0 vote on a budget that nobody wanted is really a remarkable achievement," Mayor Daniel H.
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