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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1992 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The mother of a 10-year-old fifth-grader has sued Santa Ana Unified School District for advancing her son through five years of elementary school even though he could not read or write English. Lourdes Gutierrez of Santa Ana claims in a lawsuit filed last week that educators of Glenn Martin Elementary School "wrongfully and unlawfully" failed to properly teach her son, Roberto, causing him "humiliation" among his classmates.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2000 | PETER M. WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A small city of dome tents has sprouted on a Santa Ana sidewalk where scores of parents have been camping out since Wednesday morning in hopes of registering their children for fall classes at the highly regarded Greenville Fundamental School. The annual first-come, first-served kindergarten registration ritual is a bit tamer than in previous years, when the line for Saturday's registration started the previous Monday and by Thursday more than 100 parents had staked out a place in line.
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NEWS
February 21, 1994 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mark Perew and his children have done their share of shopping for schools. The eldest began kindergarten near the family home in Lake Forest, but Perew was "very much unsatisfied." Later, his two girls spent a year in Placentia classrooms, which Perew recalls as "an absolute disaster." Unwilling to settle in his search for top-notch education, Perew considered private schools, even thought about teaching his kids at home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1999 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The devoted father hunkered down for a long stay in front of Greenville Fundamental School--five nights in a yellow-and-blue tent until he can register his daughter for kindergarten. Paul Barnes had camped out five years ago as well, to grab a spot at the coveted school for his son. But that was for only one night. "A lot more parents want to send their children to Greenville now," Barnes said Tuesday, standing amid the scores of parental tents wedged together.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1999 | NANCY TREJOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Santa Ana Mayor Miguel A. Pulido plans to start a long-term literacy campaign next month, and he is calling on business leaders, civic leaders, educators and celebrities to help.
NEWS
September 24, 1997 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid criticism from parent activists, a majority of Santa Ana school trustees gave preliminary approval Tuesday to a far-reaching plan to boost test scores by focusing almost exclusively on reading, writing and mathematics in elementary and middle schools.
NEWS
September 24, 1997 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid criticism from parent activists, a majority of Santa Ana school trustees gave preliminary approval Tuesday to a far-reaching plan to boost test scores by focusing almost exclusively on reading, writing and mathematics in elementary and middle schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1992 | JON NALICK
During a time of shrinking budgets and slashed programs, more than 150 local businesses have rallied behind the Santa Ana Unified School District, providing hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of equipment and other gifts. When the School/Business Partnership Program--aimed at cultivating long-term relationships between individual schools and local companies--started in 1984, two companies participated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1992 | JON NALICK
To alleviate future crowding at four schools, the Santa Ana Unified School District board has decided to study whether to switch them to a year-round schedule starting in the 1993-94 school year. The schools to be considered for year-round schedules are Remington and Sepulveda elementary schools and Carr and Spurgeon intermediate schools. The decision made on Tuesday initiates a process under which the board will seek community input before making a final decision on Jan. 12.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1999 | NANCY TREJOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Santa Ana Mayor Miguel A. Pulido plans to start a long-term literacy campaign next month, and he is calling on business leaders, civic leaders, educators and celebrities to help.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1997 | JEFF KASS
About 500 supporters gathered Wednesday to dedicate an unusual elementary school that seeks to produce students literate in English and Spanish. Wallace R. Davis Elementary School, which has served 780 students since July, is named for the local attorney who successfully sued the Santa Ana Unified School district in 1968 because a disproportionate number of Spanish-speaking students were moved into classes for the mentally handicapped.
NEWS
September 24, 1997 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid criticism from parent activists, a majority of Santa Ana school trustees gave preliminary approval Tuesday to a far-reaching plan to boost test scores by focusing almost exclusively on reading, writing and mathematics in elementary and middle schools.
NEWS
September 24, 1997 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid criticism from parent activists, a majority of Santa Ana school trustees gave preliminary approval Tuesday to a far-reaching plan to boost test scores by focusing almost exclusively on reading, writing and mathematics in elementary and middle schools.
NEWS
September 19, 1997 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Santa Ana schools superintendent on Thursday proposed teaching students nothing but the "three Rs" from kindergarten through eighth grade in an all-out campaign to lift his urban district's perennially mediocre test scores to at least the national average. Supt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1995 | DIANE SEO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Instead of memorizing endless geometric formulas, sixth-graders at Spurgeon Intermediate School are learning geometry by building homes and businesses out of construction paper and laying them out in a town they have named "Polyhedraville." Working in groups, the students are learning how to calculate the square-unit cost of each solid figure, or "polyhedron," and determine the area and length of the three-dimensional buildings and roads they're constructing.
SPORTS
May 11, 1994 | MICHAEL ITAGAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rich Prospero didn't see the problem with the hats. After taking the Santa Ana Valley boys' basketball coaching job in 1991, he purchased $700 worth of baseball caps, which he had planned to give to his players and sell at Falcon games. But Prospero didn't notice the signs in the Santa Ana Valley gymnasium stating, "Absolutely No Hats Allowed In The Gym." It's a precaution to prevent gang problems. Crime and gang concerns are some of the obstacles encountered by athletic programs in Santa Ana.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1999 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The devoted father hunkered down for a long stay in front of Greenville Fundamental School--five nights in a yellow-and-blue tent until he can register his daughter for kindergarten. Paul Barnes had camped out five years ago as well, to grab a spot at the coveted school for his son. But that was for only one night. "A lot more parents want to send their children to Greenville now," Barnes said Tuesday, standing amid the scores of parental tents wedged together.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1994 | JON NALICK
It might not seem that way to intermediate school students, but the school day is too short. So now, district officials are scrambling to find a way to lengthen it before the year ends. Auditors who recently completed an annual review of the district's performance interpreted an obscure state educational code as requiring schools to offer about 3,200 more minutes of instruction each year than the district currently provides, district spokeswoman Diane Thomas said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1994 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three years ago, Fabiola Orozco wasn't sure she would ever graduate from high school. Raised in Mexico, the youngster had trouble speaking English, was tempted to neglect her studies and felt a huge cultural gap between herself and her more Americanized peers. "She had a lot to overcome," Elizabeth Orozco, the young woman's mother, said Sunday. But overcome she did. This year, Fabiola, 18, was homecoming queen at Saddleback High School. And in two days she will graduate from Saddleback with a 3.
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