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Santa Ana Ca Foreign Populations

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1991 | LILY ENG and BOB SCHWARTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Fifty years ago, Hispanics made up barely 15% of Santa Ana's population. Mostly farm workers and laborers, they were forced to attend "Mexican" schools, not allowed to eat in certain restaurants, and segregated into five barrios. Now, according to U.S. Census figures released Monday, they make up 65% of the population, giving Santa Ana by far the highest percentage of Hispanics of any major California city.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1996 | JEFF KASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A recent survey of the Minnie Street neighborhood, among the poorest in the county, shows that while its mostly Latino and Cambodian immigrants live side-by-side they hold sharply different views of the area. Many of the Latino residents said they live in constant fear of gangs, drugs and violence, according to a survey conducted by Cal State Fullerton researchers for the Cambodian Family Inc., a nonprofit social services agency.
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NEWS
January 1, 1990 | LILY ENG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the biggest minority population in Orange County, this city has the most to lose--both in tax dollars and political punch--if the 1990 census fails to accurately tally immigrants, homeless people and other segments of America's hidden population. But Santa Ana civic leaders have deployed a battalion of civilian volunteers to eliminate the possibility of an undercount. Already its efforts have earned praise from U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1991 | LILY ENG and BOB SCHWARTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Fifty years ago, Hispanics made up barely 15% of Santa Ana's population. Mostly farm workers and laborers, they were forced to attend "Mexican" schools, not allowed to eat in certain restaurants, and segregated into five barrios. Now, according to U.S. Census figures released Monday, they make up 65% of the population, giving Santa Ana by far the highest percentage of Hispanics of any major California city.
NEWS
July 17, 1989 | MARIA NEWMAN, Times Staff Writer
In first-grader Savath San's home in Santa Ana, everyone speaks Cambodian. But in Room 41 at Madison Elementary School, Savath eagerly joins in as students in his class try to complete sentences in English read aloud by their teacher. "My arms. . . ." teacher Jan Ortiz begins, giving the children their cue. "Can shake," the children shout in unison, shaking their hands vigorously, showing their mastery of what for all of them is a new language. "My legs. . . ."
NEWS
July 15, 1989 | FRANK CLIFFORD and MARCIDA DODSON, Times Staff Writers
Santa Ana officials expressed alarm Friday over the U.S. Senate's vote to exclude illegal aliens from the 1990 census, saying that the action could undermine the validity of the population count and possibly rob city coffers of much-needed federal and state money. "It will be devastating to the census process. The numbers will be artificially suppressed," said City Councilman Miguel Pulido.
NEWS
October 12, 1989 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a victory for California and other states with large immigrant populations, the House Wednesday rejected a Senate-passed proposal to bar the Census Bureau from counting illegal aliens. In the vote, the House turned aside the pleas of members from Northeastern and Midwestern states whose districts are losing population, and thus could be eliminated by the 1990 census. The action came on a procedural move that blocked Rep. Tom Ridge (R-Pa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1996 | JEFF KASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A recent survey of the Minnie Street neighborhood, among the poorest in the county, shows that while its mostly Latino and Cambodian immigrants live side-by-side they hold sharply different views of the area. Many of the Latino residents said they live in constant fear of gangs, drugs and violence, according to a survey conducted by Cal State Fullerton researchers for the Cambodian Family Inc., a nonprofit social services agency.
NEWS
January 1, 1990 | LILY ENG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the biggest minority population in Orange County, this city has the most to lose--both in tax dollars and political punch--if the 1990 census fails to accurately tally immigrants, homeless people and other segments of America's hidden population. But Santa Ana civic leaders have deployed a battalion of civilian volunteers to eliminate the possibility of an undercount. Already its efforts have earned praise from U.S.
NEWS
October 12, 1989 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a victory for California and other states with large immigrant populations, the House Wednesday rejected a Senate-passed proposal to bar the Census Bureau from counting illegal aliens. In the vote, the House turned aside the pleas of members from Northeastern and Midwestern states whose districts are losing population, and thus could be eliminated by the 1990 census. The action came on a procedural move that blocked Rep. Tom Ridge (R-Pa.
NEWS
July 17, 1989 | MARIA NEWMAN, Times Staff Writer
In first-grader Savath San's home in Santa Ana, everyone speaks Cambodian. But in Room 41 at Madison Elementary School, Savath eagerly joins in as students in his class try to complete sentences in English read aloud by their teacher. "My arms. . . ." teacher Jan Ortiz begins, giving the children their cue. "Can shake," the children shout in unison, shaking their hands vigorously, showing their mastery of what for all of them is a new language. "My legs. . . ."
NEWS
July 15, 1989 | FRANK CLIFFORD and MARCIDA DODSON, Times Staff Writers
Santa Ana officials expressed alarm Friday over the U.S. Senate's vote to exclude illegal aliens from the 1990 census, saying that the action could undermine the validity of the population count and possibly rob city coffers of much-needed federal and state money. "It will be devastating to the census process. The numbers will be artificially suppressed," said City Councilman Miguel Pulido.
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