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Santa Ana Ca Ordinances

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2000 | ALEX KATZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Last year Santa Ana resident Frances Santiago had her street address on her curb repainted four times by private curb painters. Each time, the work was done without her permission. And each time, the painters tried to make Santiago pay for the unwanted work. "Every three months last year they were out there painting my curb," she said. When she refused to pay, the curb painters tried to intimidate her by falsely claiming that they worked for the city, she said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2000 | TINA BORGATTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The pushcarts from which vendors sell fresh fruit and juices, churros, chips and other snacks on downtown Santa Ana streets will have a new, uniform appearance under guidelines passed Monday by the City Council. The action settles a lawsuit by the vendors filed more than a year ago after the council voted to ban the pushcarts, citing concerns about litter and food safety. The merchants have been operating since then under a court injunction until the issue could be settled.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1989 | MARK LANDSBAUM, Times Staff Writer
A little traffic enforcement apparently has succeeded where all else had failed. For years, despite the efforts of Santa Ana Police, prostitutes in search of customers had paraded along Harbor Boulevard, hailing motorists and openly soliciting. At its worst, police estimate, there would be 30 to 40 prostitutes at a time soliciting business from passing motorists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2000 | Tina Borgatta, (714) 966-5982
Stricter guidelines for pushcart vendors downtown and a briefing on a Main Place Mall expansion top the agenda for tonight's City Council meeting. The council will consider an ordinance requiring pushcart vendors to wear Mexican-style shirts and adhere to new rules on cleanliness and food storage, which could force many vendors into buying larger carts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1991 | GREG HERNANDEZ
The City Council on Tuesday will consider passing an ordinance that would ban outdoor swap meets. The ordinance, which has been recommended by the city's Planning Commission, is being proposed "in an effort to maintain the character of the city's neighborhoods," according to a city staff report. The report states that outdoor swap meets in the city have historically resulted in parking problems, theft, noise, trash and "neighborhood intrusion" by swap meet customers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1993 | JON NALICK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a move aimed at toning down noisy parties and reducing the amount of time police spend responding to them, the City Council on Tuesday tentatively approved an anti-noise law. The law allows police to issue tickets on their first call to anyone who pumps up the volume or creates loud noise. Currently, police can bill those responsible for the noise only if officers have to respond several times and only then if a witness is willing to sign a complaint, said Police Chief Paul M. Walters.
NEWS
April 25, 1995 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The California Supreme Court on Monday upheld a sweeping Santa Ana homeless ordinance, ruling that cities may prosecute people for using a sleeping bag or blanket on public property. On a 6-1 vote, the court held that Santa Ana's 1992 law, one of the toughest in the nation, does not violate the constitutional rights of the homeless. The ruling overturns a lower court decision that the law posed cruel and unusual punishment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1991 | MARY HELEN BERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A cougar in an Irvine bedroom. A tiger on a Santa Ana porch. Sharks in a back-yard pool in Orange. Pot-bellied pigs in Costa Mesa. Whether owned by humans who hanker for the exotic side of Mother Nature or by yuppies seeking a new status symbol, pets in Orange County have included the wild, rare and weird. But under an ordinance upheld in the city of Orange last week, trendy pets such as miniature farm animals and boa constrictors more than 6 feet long had better run, or slither, for cover.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1992 | JON NALICK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After a 90-minute tour of some of the city's most overcrowded neighborhoods on Friday, a top state housing official said he has seen few areas as densely packed with people, and agreed with local officials that the problem jeopardizes the health and safety of residents. "I've seen different underdeveloped areas that were overcrowded before, but probably never of this magnitude," said Carl D. Covitz, state secretary for housing, business, transportation and housing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2000 | MEG JAMES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court has handed a victory to a Santa Ana tow truck owner who used a federal trade law to circumvent towing regulations in several Orange County cities. Patrick P. Tocher, who owns Pacific Coast Motoring and California Coastal Towing, sued the cities and police departments of Santa Ana, Costa Mesa and Tustin in 1995, contending that deregulation laws passed by Congress usurped city ordinances.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2000 | TINA BORGATTA and ALEX KATZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's lunchtime in downtown Santa Ana. People stroll along 4th Street, passing or stopping at the pushcarts where vendors sell fruit and churros. They step over big bags of chips and swat a fly or two attracted to the open containers of fruit syrup on the carts' shelves. It's a scene that will probably change soon--at least in part--if the city reaches agreement with lawyers representing the vendors in a lawsuit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 2000 | TINA BORGATTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The racks and tables of clothes, shoes and toys displayed outside the entrances of many Santa Ana stores will be cleared away under an ordinance approved by the City Council on Monday night. Citing safety concerns and aesthetics, city officials proposed banning outdoor retail displays. Until now, merchants have been allowed to roll out racks of clothes and set up tables displaying their merchandise in covered store entryways.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2000 | ALEX KATZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Last year Santa Ana resident Frances Santiago had her street address on her curb repainted four times by private curb painters. Each time, the work was done without her permission. And each time, the painters tried to make Santiago pay for the unwanted work. "Every three months last year they were out there painting my curb," she said. When she refused to pay, the curb painters tried to intimidate her by falsely claiming that they worked for the city, she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2000 | MEG JAMES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court has handed a victory to a Santa Ana tow truck owner who used a federal trade law to circumvent towing regulations in several Orange County cities. Patrick P. Tocher, who owns Pacific Coast Motoring and California Coastal Towing, sued the cities and police departments of Santa Ana, Costa Mesa and Tustin in 1995, contending that deregulation laws passed by Congress usurped city ordinances.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1994 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort to clean up the city's neighborhoods and crack down on illegal businesses, the City Council on Monday gave preliminary approval to an ordinance allowing garage sales only on the first weekend in March, June, September and December. The campaign to restrict the sales to four weekends a year grew out of residents' complaints that such sales were unsightly junk-fests, often covering for small businesses operating regularly out of driveways and parking lots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1989 | GEORGE BUNDY SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Time has apparently expired on free parking in downtown Santa Ana. By April, the city will begin installing more than 600 parking meters in the downtown area, marking the first time that metered parking has been used there since the mid-1970s. The move, approved by the City Council on Tuesday, is part of an effort to regulate parking in the downtown area, said Roger Kooi, the city's downtown development manager.
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