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Santa Ana Ca Population

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1991 | LILY ENG and BOB SCHWARTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Fifty years ago, Hispanics made up barely 15% of Santa Ana's population. Mostly farm workers and laborers, they were forced to attend "Mexican" schools, not allowed to eat in certain restaurants, and segregated into five barrios. Now, according to U.S. Census figures released Monday, they make up 65% of the population, giving Santa Ana by far the highest percentage of Hispanics of any major California city.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2001 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the news broke last week that Santa Ana had the highest concentration of Spanish-speaking people in the nation, some residents imagined reactionary murmurs from outside: "They are taking over." But the new Census Bureau survey--in which 74% of the city's residents said they speak Spanish and 15% of those 18 to 64 said they spoke no English--was a stark, connect-the-dots silhouette of a city whose full portrait is far more nuanced.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2001 | NITA LELYVELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Santa Ana has the highest concentration of Spanish-speaking residents in the nation, with about 15% of those 18 to 64 speaking no English--nearly four times the California average, according to Census Bureau estimates released today. Spanish is so much a part of life in Santa Ana that 74% of the city's residents speak it, according to the government's Supplementary Survey, a detailed 40-question form sent out last year to 700,000 households in 1,203 U.S. counties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2001 | NITA LELYVELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Santa Ana has the highest concentration of Spanish-speaking residents in the nation, with about 15% of those 18 to 64 speaking no English--nearly four times the California average, according to Census Bureau estimates released today. Spanish is so much a part of life in Santa Ana that 74% of the city's residents speak it, according to the government's Supplementary Survey, a detailed 40-question form sent out last year to 700,000 households in 1,203 U.S. counties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1989
City officials and community leaders met with a U.S. Census Bureau representative Tuesday to get ideas for reaching out to minority communities to ensure a more accurate count in the 1990 census, especially among Latino and Asian residents. Peter Bounpane, assistant director of the U.S. Census Bureau, made the one-day visit at the request of Santa Ana City Councilman Miguel A. Pulido, who said the city's population has changed since 1980.
NEWS
July 18, 1989 | FRANK CLIFFORD, Times Urban Affairs Writer
The city of Los Angeles and several other large metropolitan areas Monday won an important legal victory in a long struggle to compel the U.S. Census Bureau to change the way it tallies minority groups, homeless people, immigrants, illegal aliens and other mainly poor people who are often missed by census takers. In a settlement Monday of a lawsuit brought by Los Angeles, the state of California, New York City, Chicago and Dade County, Fla.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1989 | GEORGE FRANK
The director of the county Social Services Agency wants all Orange County residents, including illegal aliens, to be counted in the 1990 Census, and he will ask the Board of Supervisors to support his position. A resolution doing just that will be introduced at the supervisors' meeting Tuesday. Agency officials said that if illegal aliens were to be excluded from the count, it would mean that, on paper, the county had 200,000 fewer residents than the county's actual population.
NEWS
December 13, 1993 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Should Santa Ana be the metropolitan downtown for an increasingly cosmopolitan Orange County? Or is it California's largest Latino city and a showcase for the multicultural experience? The two profiles overlap, but the debate that has developed here reveals a city with an identity crisis. Increasingly, there are two sides arguing the city's future, and concerns exist about a widening gap within the community.
NEWS
June 19, 1990 | LILY ENG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blaming an influx of illegal aliens for some of Santa Ana's worst urban problems, a citizens advisory group Monday called for police officials to "gain control over the expanding illegal immigrant population in the city" by working closer with federal immigration authorities.
NEWS
May 17, 1992 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a few pitches of baseball in the middle of Sycamore Street with some of the younger kids on the block, 16-year-old Luis Garcia is ready for another game. "Let's go play handball," he tells a friend, 15-year-old Jose Mendoza. Their court, it turns out, is the locked front door of a Catholic school auditorium just a short walk away. Without readily accessible parks, the city's youth invent their own playing fields. In Santa Ana, every patch of green space has become a precious commodity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2001 | HECTOR BECERRA and FRED ALVAREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A decade ago, Santa Ana, El Monte and Oxnard had zero Latino mayors. Now they all do. That's one reflection of a Census Bureau report, released today, that listed the three cities and unincorporated East Los Angeles among America's 10 leading Latino hubs. East L.A.--96.8% Latino, according to Census 2000--had the highest concentration of Latinos of any American community with 100,000 or more people. Santa Ana (76.1%), El Monte (72.4%) and Oxnard (66.2%) ranked seventh through ninth.
NEWS
September 20, 2000 | JENNIFER MENA and RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Santa Ana and Anaheim increased their census participation more than any other major cities in the nation, federal officials said Tuesday, putting them on track to receive more government funding. The showing caps an all-out campaign that marshaled everyone from street vendors to local doctors and teachers in a push for the most complete count possible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1994 | DOREEN CARVAJAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the walls of Mr. B's barbershop are hundreds of fading photos of customers whose satisfied smiles pay tribute to the head barber's mastery of naturals and bone cuts, flattops and fades. Billy (Mr. B.) Kirby still savors the sweet memory of when those clients lined up 20 deep in the morning chill outside his shop to wait for a clip or banged on his front door to beg for a razor cut. Today he and his son, "Dollar Bill" Kirby Jr.
NEWS
December 13, 1993 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Should Santa Ana be the metropolitan downtown for an increasingly cosmopolitan Orange County? Or is it California's largest Latino city and a showcase for the multicultural experience? The two profiles overlap, but the debate that has developed here reveals a city with an identity crisis. Increasingly, there are two sides arguing the city's future, and concerns exist about a widening gap within the community.
NEWS
May 17, 1992 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a few pitches of baseball in the middle of Sycamore Street with some of the younger kids on the block, 16-year-old Luis Garcia is ready for another game. "Let's go play handball," he tells a friend, 15-year-old Jose Mendoza. Their court, it turns out, is the locked front door of a Catholic school auditorium just a short walk away. Without readily accessible parks, the city's youth invent their own playing fields. In Santa Ana, every patch of green space has become a precious commodity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1992 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ink was barely dry on the city's proposed map for new ward boundaries when critics surfaced last week to oppose the plan. In a city that experienced a similar political skirmish two years ago when the current map was drawn, the simmering debate warned of a replay as the city adjusts its council districts to reflect population changes in the 1990 census.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1991 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Student enrollment in the Santa Ana Unified School District is expected to increase by 22,000 students by the year 2000, requiring the district to construct more than 680 new classrooms, according to a study to be presented to the school board later this month. Santa Ana Unified administrators presented a preview of the study last week to officials from the city and neighboring school districts to point out the dire need for new and improved schools in Santa Ana.
NEWS
November 16, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The city's crackdown on overcrowded apartments was thwarted when an appellate court temporarily blocked an ordinance that sets strict occupancy limits. Last month, a Superior Court upheld the ordinance, which limits occupancy of an average one-bedroom apartment to five people. In the petition filed with the appellate court on behalf of Santa Ana assembly plant worker Ascension Briseno, immigrant rights attorney Richard L.
NEWS
November 16, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The city's crackdown on overcrowded apartments was thwarted when an appellate court temporarily blocked an ordinance that sets strict occupancy limits. Last month, a Superior Court upheld the ordinance, which limits occupancy of an average one-bedroom apartment to five people. In the petition filed with the appellate court on behalf of Santa Ana assembly plant worker Ascension Briseno, immigrant rights attorney Richard L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1991 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city's crackdown on overcrowded apartments was thwarted Friday when an appellate court temporarily blocked an ordinance that sets strict occupancy limits. The 4th District Court of Appeals ordered that the ordinance not take effect until it hears appeals in the case. Last month, a Superior Court had upheld the ordinance, which limits occupancy of an average one-bedroom apartment to five people. "It's a disappointment that we cannot start to deal with this overcrowding now," Mayor Daniel H.
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