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Santa Ana Ca State Aid

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1999 | Jason Kandel, (714) 564-1038
The City Council recently approved spending $93,564 in state education funds to expand its free lunch program through the summer months. The city's Recreation and Community Services Agency has operated a free lunch program for children from low-income families during the fall and spring semesters for the past three years. The council needed to expand the program because a majority of schools in Santa Ana are now year-round.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2000 | Tina Borgatta, (714) 966-5982
The City Council will discuss authorizing city staff to seek state funding for the Pacific Electric and Flower Street bike trails at its meeting tonight. The council will also discuss purchasing an infrared camera for Police Department use, allocating about $3.6 million for street and infrastructure improvements in several areas of the city, approving $413,200 worth of improvements to the Santiago Park playground, and creating a deputy city manager position for development services.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1995 | JEFF KASS
Santa Ana Unified School District trustees tonight will consider how to spend $2.3 million in state grant money. A district report recommends that the largest chunk, $1.37 million, be used for textbooks and other instructional materials. "The school board has directed that the funds be as close to the students as possible," Deputy Supt. John Bennett said. "A textbook in a student's hand--you couldn't get much closer."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1999 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Santa Ana officials said Thursday that they have run out of money to expand their effort to reduce the city's high pedestrian accident rate, and they asked state legislators for help. Their plea came at the Assembly Transportation Committee's first hearing on pedestrian safety, which state officials have vowed to make a priority. Officials said they need more money to hire officers, expand educational programs and make street improvements. Lt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1994 | THAO HUA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two Orange County cities will receive nearly $200,000 to combat alcohol-related crime. Anaheim and Santa Ana, which have the highest number of liquor-license holders in the county, will each receive about $100,000 from the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control, officials announced Thursday. The funding is part of a program called the Grant Assistant to Local Law Enforcement Project, which aims at lowering crime at "problem establishments," officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1993 | JON NALICK
In an effort to put the rush back into rush hour, city engineers are designing a $7-million traffic-control system that would use computers and other high-tech hardware to reduce congestion on local streets and freeways. The sophisticated traffic monitoring will work in tandem with the California Department of Transportation's system to guide drivers around freeway trouble spots, provide radio traffic reports and regulate traffic on local streets to reduce travel time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1993 | JON NALICK
City officials accepted a $100,000 state grant this week that will pay for an innovative video system designed to make arraignments of criminal suspects vastly more efficient. Assemblyman Tom Umberg (D-Garden Grove) presented Mayor Daniel H. Young with a check for the program at the City Council meeting Monday. The video system will be incorporated into the 48-cell detention center near City Hall, which is expected to be open in December.
NEWS
January 1, 1990 | LILY ENG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the biggest minority population in Orange County, this city has the most to lose--both in tax dollars and political punch--if the 1990 census fails to accurately tally immigrants, homeless people and other segments of America's hidden population. But Santa Ana civic leaders have deployed a battalion of civilian volunteers to eliminate the possibility of an undercount. Already its efforts have earned praise from U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1989 | GEORGE FRANK
The director of the county Social Services Agency wants all Orange County residents, including illegal aliens, to be counted in the 1990 Census, and he will ask the Board of Supervisors to support his position. A resolution doing just that will be introduced at the supervisors' meeting Tuesday. Agency officials said that if illegal aliens were to be excluded from the count, it would mean that, on paper, the county had 200,000 fewer residents than the county's actual population.
BUSINESS
August 3, 1994 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last summer, Ernie Rodriguez was so close to relocating his plastics company from Santa Ana that he had already picked out a site in Corona. But by fall, Rodriguez had decided to stay put. He credits his change of heart to Santa Ana's enterprise zone, which, through various tax incentives, will probably save his 50-employee company, Southern California Plastics, at least $25,000 this year in state business income tax--and much more in the future.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1995 | JEFF KASS
Santa Ana Unified School District trustees tonight will consider how to spend $2.3 million in state grant money. A district report recommends that the largest chunk, $1.37 million, be used for textbooks and other instructional materials. "The school board has directed that the funds be as close to the students as possible," Deputy Supt. John Bennett said. "A textbook in a student's hand--you couldn't get much closer."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1994 | THAO HUA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two Orange County cities will receive nearly $200,000 to combat alcohol-related crime. Anaheim and Santa Ana, which have the highest number of liquor-license holders in the county, will each receive about $100,000 from the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control, officials announced Thursday. The funding is part of a program called the Grant Assistant to Local Law Enforcement Project, which aims at lowering crime at "problem establishments," officials said.
BUSINESS
August 3, 1994 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last summer, Ernie Rodriguez was so close to relocating his plastics company from Santa Ana that he had already picked out a site in Corona. But by fall, Rodriguez had decided to stay put. He credits his change of heart to Santa Ana's enterprise zone, which, through various tax incentives, will probably save his 50-employee company, Southern California Plastics, at least $25,000 this year in state business income tax--and much more in the future.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1993 | JON NALICK
City officials accepted a $100,000 state grant this week that will pay for an innovative video system designed to make arraignments of criminal suspects vastly more efficient. Assemblyman Tom Umberg (D-Garden Grove) presented Mayor Daniel H. Young with a check for the program at the City Council meeting Monday. The video system will be incorporated into the 48-cell detention center near City Hall, which is expected to be open in December.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1993 | JON NALICK
In an effort to put the rush back into rush hour, city engineers are designing a $7-million traffic-control system that would use computers and other high-tech hardware to reduce congestion on local streets and freeways. The sophisticated traffic monitoring will work in tandem with the California Department of Transportation's system to guide drivers around freeway trouble spots, provide radio traffic reports and regulate traffic on local streets to reduce travel time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1999 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Santa Ana officials said Thursday that they have run out of money to expand their effort to reduce the city's high pedestrian accident rate, and they asked state legislators for help. Their plea came at the Assembly Transportation Committee's first hearing on pedestrian safety, which state officials have vowed to make a priority. Officials said they need more money to hire officers, expand educational programs and make street improvements. Lt.
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