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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1996 | JEFF KASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The school board has decided not to place a measure on the June ballot that would have raised $32 million to improve classroom technology by imposing a $15-a-year tax on property owners. The proposal effectively died at this week's3 school board meeting after none of the Santa Ana Unified School District trustees backed a motion by board President Sal Mendoza to vote on the issue.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1996 | JEFF KASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The school board has decided not to place a measure on the June ballot that would have raised $32 million to improve classroom technology by imposing a $15-a-year tax on property owners. The proposal effectively died at this week's3 school board meeting after none of the Santa Ana Unified School District trustees backed a motion by board President Sal Mendoza to vote on the issue.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1996 | JEFF KASS
A tax proposal that would cost the average household about $15 a year and would be used to improve classroom technology is scheduled for a review by the school board tonight. Faced with overcrowding and badly needed repairs at some schools, trustees of the Santa Ana Unified School District appointed a committee in June to gauge public support for a bond measure. The district estimates that it needs more than $125 million to expand and modernize its schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1996 | JEFF KASS
A tax proposal that would cost the average household about $15 a year and would be used to improve classroom technology is scheduled for a review by the school board tonight. Faced with overcrowding and badly needed repairs at some schools, trustees of the Santa Ana Unified School District appointed a committee in June to gauge public support for a bond measure. The district estimates that it needs more than $125 million to expand and modernize its schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1994 | ALICIA DI RADO
Residents will see higher taxes on their utility bills if Santa Ana goes ahead with its plan to build a police headquarters and a large jail. The proposed utility users tax increase, expected to be 1%, has been the target of a bitter debate in recent months. About 30 people attended this week's City Council meeting to protest the proposal. Residents will have another chance to tell the City Council how they feel about the increase at a public hearing at 6 p.m. Feb.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1991 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Troubled by a proposed city budget that includes higher utility taxes and not enough money for municipal code enforcement officers, the City Council has decided to delay its vote for two weeks on the $242.4-million spending plan. Among those voicing concerns over the proposed budget were Santa Ana Chamber of Commerce officials who oppose the city's plans to raise the cap on the utility tax because it would hurt businesses, they said. The current cap is $6,000 per year per business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1991 | GEBE MARTINEZ
Sitting in the Santa Ana City Council chambers recently, a song from the Broadway musical "The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas" kept running through my mind. No, I was not thinking of prostitutes. I was remembering the little diddle, "The Sidestep"--a tune sung by the governor as he dodged public questioning over whether an infamous whorehouse in the heart of rural Texas should be closed down. "Ooooooohhh, I love to dance a little sidestep. Now they see me, now they don't.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1991 | GREG HERNANDEZ
The City Council on Monday gave low-income residents a tax break by unanimously approving higher exemption levels for household utility bills. The new exemption levels, which are consistent with the levels set by the state Public Utilities Commission, will now be based on family size.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1991 | GREG HERNANDEZ
Owners of multistory buildings in the downtown area of the city will decide in a special election this month whether to approve a new tax to pay for special equipment to fight fires in tall buildings. The proposed tax, which would be added to annual property tax bills, is 16 cents per square foot for buildings three stories or higher, excluding parking structures. The fee would be implemented gradually over a four-year period and does not affect single-family homeowners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1993 | JON NALICK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Noting that drug dealers, prostitutes and other misdemeanor offenders routinely go free because of lack of jail space, city officials Monday unveiled plans for a $90-million city jail that would cost residents an extra 1% of their utility bills. The County Jail, which the city now uses, is "like a revolving door," Police Chief Paul M. Walters told the Santa Ana City Council Monday night during a slide-show presentation by city staff. "You can't hold people accountable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1994 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Declaring an assault on crime, the Santa Ana City Council unanimously approved construction of a $105-million jail and police headquarters Tuesday and a 1% utility tax hike to help pay for it. The unanimous vote came after dozens of residents told of increasing assaults and burglaries in their neighborhoods and said the tax hike was a small price to pay for safety. "Raising taxes is at times dishonest, immoral and dirty," resident Jose Vargas said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1994 | ALICIA DI RADO
Residents will see higher taxes on their utility bills if Santa Ana goes ahead with its plan to build a police headquarters and a large jail. The proposed utility users tax increase, expected to be 1%, has been the target of a bitter debate in recent months. About 30 people attended this week's City Council meeting to protest the proposal. Residents will have another chance to tell the City Council how they feel about the increase at a public hearing at 6 p.m. Feb.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1993 | JON NALICK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Noting that drug dealers, prostitutes and other misdemeanor offenders routinely go free because of lack of jail space, city officials Monday unveiled plans for a $90-million city jail that would cost residents an extra 1% of their utility bills. The County Jail, which the city now uses, is "like a revolving door," Police Chief Paul M. Walters told the Santa Ana City Council Monday night during a slide-show presentation by city staff. "You can't hold people accountable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1993 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Behind the shady trees that line the streets of this old neighborhood stand remnants of the grand homes that once gave the French Court area its identity. But the boarded-up front window of a Tudor-style house on French Street, broken by local vandals, is just one small sign of a neighborhood on the verge of being lost to decay. On the corner, graffiti covers a a U.S. mailbox, and across the road, a torn screen hangs from an apartment complex in disrepair.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1991 | GEBE MARTINEZ
Sitting in the Santa Ana City Council chambers recently, a song from the Broadway musical "The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas" kept running through my mind. No, I was not thinking of prostitutes. I was remembering the little diddle, "The Sidestep"--a tune sung by the governor as he dodged public questioning over whether an infamous whorehouse in the heart of rural Texas should be closed down. "Ooooooohhh, I love to dance a little sidestep. Now they see me, now they don't.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1991 | GREG HERNANDEZ
The City Council on Monday gave low-income residents a tax break by unanimously approving higher exemption levels for household utility bills. The new exemption levels, which are consistent with the levels set by the state Public Utilities Commission, will now be based on family size.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1991 | GREG HERNANDEZ
Owners of high-rise buildings have rejected a proposed tax that would have helped pay for fire stations and equipment to help fight fires in those buildings. The election, which was conducted by mail, involved 104 building owners. The number of votes given to each building owner was based on the number of acres occupied by the building. The tax was defeated 185 to 47.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1989
Santa Ana will hire 13 new police officers and 15 firefighters under a $233.9-million budget that includes a city utility tax increase from 3% to 4%. Under the new budget, adopted by the City Council late Monday, the higher utility taxes will be used to pay for the new police and firemen. The tax is added to monthly telephone, gas and electricity bills. The increase will take effect Dec. 1. City Manager David N.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1991 | GEBE MARTINEZ
Low-income residents could get a break on utility taxes if the City Council approves higher exemption levels for household utility users at its meeting tonight. The new exemption levels proposed by city staff would be based on family size and are consistent with those set by the state Public Utilities Commission. Currently, Santa Ana taxpayers are not eligible for an exemption unless the combined gross income of all members of the household is less than $10,000.
BUSINESS
June 19, 1991 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Representatives of the city's largest employers, including medical, manufacturing and other firms, have united against a proposed utility tax increase that threatens to send some companies into a financial tailspin while helping to balance the city's $242-million budget. After a meeting Tuesday at Western Medical Center-Santa Ana with City Manager David N.
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