Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSanta Ana Ca Transportation
IN THE NEWS

Santa Ana Ca Transportation

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1999 | RICHARD MAROSI and SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
About two weeks ago, 16-year-old Maria Cervatas was crossing a street in front of Willard Intermediate School with her 2-year-old sister when a car came speeding toward them. She pushed her sister out of the way and ran--with the car coming to a screeching halt just a foot from them. You don't have to tell her that the area around the Santa Ana school is a hazard zone for pedestrians. She and others in the densely populated, traffic-choked neighborhood said they live with the dangers every day.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2001 | JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Santa Ana resident Salvador Ramirez was looking for a taxi, he didn't seek out a shiny yellow car. Instead, he headed to 1st Street and Broadway, where drivers of old sedans offer rides across town or as far as Tijuana, despite the efforts of police to crack down on unlicensed cabbies. Moments later, Ramirez was off to the Santa Ana Regional Transportation Center in a rusting tomato-red Chevrolet Caprice. The fare was $2. The bandit cab "is faster than the bus and it's cheaper than a cab.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1999 | Jason Kandel, (714) 966-5848
The City Council has approved a plan to apply for grant money for several improvement projects. The request will be made to the Orange County Transportation Authority Transportation Enhancement Activity Program, which provides money to help cities make aesthetic enhancements and capital improvement projects near transportation facilities. OCTA will allocate up to $6.4 million in fiscal 2003-2004 for new projects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2000 | Tina Borgatta, (714) 966-5982
As part of a six-month trial period aimed at eliminating high-speed traffic shortcuts through the French Park neighborhood, sections of Spurgeon and French streets and Washington Avenue will be closed. The City Council approved the plan Monday night, despite protests from about a dozen area residents. The French Park homeowners association had been working with the city on a plan for several years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1999 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A transit agency board member who refused to participate in a recent closed-session vote to buy 31 acres in Santa Ana for a bus depot questioned Monday the legality of the decision to go forward with the purchase.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1994
The Santa Ana Freeway was closed from Sunday night to 5 a.m. today from the Costa Mesa Freeway interchange to 4th Street to undertake the first of four nights of bridge work planned by the California Department of Transportation. The closure, in effect from 11:59 p.m. to 5 a.m., will be repeated Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday while workers repair various bridges along the route. Travelers should take alternate routes during the hours that the work is in progress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1992 | GEBE MARTINEZ and JON NALICK
Voters in a survey rejected a major rerouting plan proposed to ease congestion from freeway traffic in the city's northwest area, according to results released Friday. But the survey of 2,700 residences that followed weeks of angry debate did not result in a resounding victory for opponents because a ballot option to leave the neighborhood's traffic patterns as is also did not receive the required approval from two-thirds of the voters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1992 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With one traffic plan already voted down in a heated election, northwest residents Tuesday asked the City Council to help end a neighborhood civil war by developing a traffic solution agreeable to most. The council referred the matter to its environmental and transportation advisory committee and asked that other traffic proposals be considered.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1992 | GEBE MARTINEZ
The "vote yes" neon-yellow yard signs that dotted many homes in the city's northwest corner were just one indication of the high voter interest in the advisory election balloting that ended Monday to decide whether a major traffic plan should be implemented there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1993 | JON NALICK
As part of a plan to improve traffic safety, city engineers are examining several potentially dangerous railroad crossings that have no gates and, in some cases, poor warning equipment and limited visibility for motorists. When the survey is completed, the report will be used to seek federal grants to improve those sites, Traffic Engineer T.C. Sutaria said. About one dozen crossings citywide have no gates and present a potential hazard to drivers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1999 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A transit agency board member who refused to participate in a recent closed-session vote to buy 31 acres in Santa Ana for a bus depot questioned Monday the legality of the decision to go forward with the purchase.
NEWS
September 12, 1999 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For much of the last decade, a stretch of 17th Street with a 35 mph speed limit resembled an expressway, with the speed of most drivers rising from 41 mph in 1987 to 47 mph in 1997. So Santa Ana did what has become a common practice in California: It raised the speed limit. Now, motorists there are permitted to drive 40 mph along most of the street, even though it's the site of more than two dozen accidents a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1999 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the last decade, a stretch of 17th Street in Santa Ana has come to resemble an expressway more than an uptown avenue, with speeds increasing from an average of 41 in 1987 to 47 in 1997. So the city did what has become common practice among California traffic engineers: It raised the speed limit. Now motorists are permitted to drive 40 mph, a 5 mph increase, despite more than 40 injury accidents a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1999 | Jason Kandel, (714) 966-5848
The City Council has approved a plan to apply for grant money for several improvement projects. The request will be made to the Orange County Transportation Authority Transportation Enhancement Activity Program, which provides money to help cities make aesthetic enhancements and capital improvement projects near transportation facilities. OCTA will allocate up to $6.4 million in fiscal 2003-2004 for new projects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1999 | JASON KANDEL and RICHARD MAROSI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The number of pedestrian accidents in Santa Ana rose during the first six months of the year compared to the same period in 1998, despite a police crackdown aimed at reducing injuries and fatalities. The Santa Ana Police Department reported Monday that five pedestrians died between January and June this year compared to two during the first six months of 1998. A sixth pedestrian was fatally injured by a car last week. Seventy-eight pedestrians were injured through June 30.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1999
A pedestrian was seriously injured Tuesday night when he was struck by a car near the intersection of 1st and Jackson streets in Santa Ana, police said. The man, who was not identified, suffered life-threatening injuries and was transported to UCI Medical Center in Orange, Sgt. Bruce Leamer said. The pedestrian's identity and medical condition were unavailable. Details of the incident, which occurred about 9:16 p.m.
NEWS
December 12, 1993 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With his children playing safely in his front yard behind a waist-high chain-link fence, Paul Lopez watched the neighborhood children on Cedar Street doing what kids do best in those precious few hours between school and darkness: ride bikes, toss a ball back and forth, and chatter away. And every now and then, a car whizzed by. "A while back," Lopez said, "a kid ran across the street. He didn't look. Luckily, the truck braked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1990
The city will sign agreements with four engineering firms whose inspectors will determine whether local bridges, freeways and railroad lines are safe after an earthquake. A staff report to the council cited the Oct. 17 earthquake in San Francisco as one of the reasons Santa Ana needs to have a plan to respond to disasters that could cripple some of the city's transportation routes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1999 | RICHARD MAROSI and SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
About two weeks ago, 16-year-old Maria Cervatas was crossing a street in front of Willard Intermediate School with her 2-year-old sister when a car came speeding toward them. She pushed her sister out of the way and ran--with the car coming to a screeching halt just a foot from them. You don't have to tell her that the area around the Santa Ana school is a hazard zone for pedestrians. She and others in the densely populated, traffic-choked neighborhood said they live with the dangers every day.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|