Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSanta Ana Regional Water Quality Control Board
IN THE NEWS

Santa Ana Regional Water Quality Control Board

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2000
Gov. Gray Davis has appointed two new members to the Santa Ana Regional Water Quality Control Board, creating a quorum for the first time since last autumn. Although the delay hasn't stalled any development or environmental projects so far, the appointments announced Tuesday came after the board canceled its meeting this Friday for lack of a quorum.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2001 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State water officials put off voting on sweeping new rules on storm water runoff in northern and central Orange County after local officials objected to dozens of revisions they never got a chance to review. "Failure to [delay the vote], I respectfully suggest . . . could cause or contribute to the development of an antagonistic relationship because it will compel city councils . . . to petition this matter to the state board," said attorney Rufus C. Young Jr.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 16, 1991 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A costly cleanup of the long-besieged Santa Ana River was unanimously approved Friday by a regional water board, capping years of debate over resolving one of Southern California's most severe water pollution problems. Under the new plan, sewage plants in the Inland Empire must reduce nitrate levels in the millions of gallons of waste that flow into the river every day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2000 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An upscale housing construction site is not the only source of illegal discharges into the fragile marine ecosystem off Crystal Cove State Park, a regional water agency's staff said Tuesday--an elementary school, a road and historic cottages also are culprits. The staff of the Santa Ana Regional Water Quality Control Board recommended that the board issue a cease-and-desist order against the Irvine Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2000 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Regional water regulators on Tuesday said they will order the Irvine Co. to stop discharging water from a construction site through a system of pipes that leads onto a popular beach at Crystal Cove State Park. The regulators said state law prohibits discharging runoff into Crystal Cove because it is listed by the state as biologically sensitive. The pipe network was discovered last month by an activist, who crawled inside a culvert to document the source of increased runoff pooling on the beach.
NEWS
June 3, 1991 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After five years of debate and delays in resolving one of Southern California's most severe water pollution problems, state officials are completing a cleanup strategy for the Santa Ana River that affects three counties and could cost half a billion dollars. A recently released report that took three years and $1 million to compile outlines the solutions, all of which are controversial and expensive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2000 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 9,000 gallons of treated effluent carved a 10-foot-wide trench through a popular state beach that has come under scrutiny by state water regulators. Officials of the Santa Ana Regional Water Board meanwhile said Tuesday that they plan to order the Irvine Co. to stop discharging water into a network of concrete pipes that has been emptying runoff onto Crystal Cove beach, next to a biologically significant marine area. State law forbids such discharge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2000 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whether requiring filters in storm drains, banning some garden pesticides or regulating how often people can wash their cars, new water pollution limits taking effect in Orange County could change the way residents do some basic household chores. Newport Bay, which has long been unsafe for swimming and fishing, is the first of 15 impaired Orange County waterways to be targeted with rules on how much sediment, bacteria, nutrients and other materials can flow into them.
NEWS
November 16, 1991 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A costly cleanup of the long-besieged Santa Ana River was unanimously approved Friday by a regional water board, capping years of debate over how to resolve one of Southern California's most severe water pollution problems. Under the new plan, sewage plants in the Inland Empire must reduce nitrates in the millions of gallons of waste that flow daily into the river.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2001 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State water officials put off voting on sweeping new rules on storm water runoff in northern and central Orange County after local officials objected to dozens of revisions they never got a chance to review. "Failure to [delay the vote], I respectfully suggest . . . could cause or contribute to the development of an antagonistic relationship because it will compel city councils . . . to petition this matter to the state board," said attorney Rufus C. Young Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2000 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 9,000 gallons of treated effluent carved a 10-foot-wide trench through a popular state beach that has come under scrutiny by state water regulators. Officials of the Santa Ana Regional Water Board meanwhile said Tuesday that they plan to order the Irvine Co. to stop discharging water into a network of concrete pipes that has been emptying runoff onto Crystal Cove beach, next to a biologically significant marine area. State law forbids such discharge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2000 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Regional water regulators on Tuesday said they will order the Irvine Co. to stop discharging water from a construction site through a system of pipes that leads onto a popular beach at Crystal Cove State Park. The regulators said state law prohibits discharging runoff into Crystal Cove because it is listed by the state as biologically sensitive. The pipe network was discovered last month by an activist, who crawled inside a culvert to document the source of increased runoff pooling on the beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2000 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whether requiring filters in storm drains, banning some garden pesticides or regulating how often people can wash their cars, new water pollution limits taking effect in Orange County could change the way residents do some basic household chores. Newport Bay, which has long been unsafe for swimming and fishing, is the first of 15 impaired Orange County waterways to be targeted with rules on how much sediment, bacteria, nutrients and other materials can flow into them.
NEWS
January 27, 2000 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
In a sweeping effort to prevent Los Angeles County beaches from becoming more polluted as population grows, the region's water quality board Wednesday approved standards to require new building projects across the county to limit urban runoff that fouls ocean waters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2000
Gov. Gray Davis has appointed two new members to the Santa Ana Regional Water Quality Control Board, creating a quorum for the first time since last autumn. Although the delay hasn't stalled any development or environmental projects so far, the appointments announced Tuesday came after the board canceled its meeting this Friday for lack of a quorum.
NEWS
November 16, 1991 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A costly cleanup of the long-besieged Santa Ana River was unanimously approved Friday by a regional water board, capping years of debate over resolving one of Southern California's most severe water pollution problems. Under the new plan, sewage plants in the Inland Empire must reduce nitrate levels in the millions of gallons of waste that flow into the river every day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2000 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An upscale housing construction site is not the only source of illegal discharges into the fragile marine ecosystem off Crystal Cove State Park, a regional water agency's staff said Tuesday--an elementary school, a road and historic cottages also are culprits. The staff of the Santa Ana Regional Water Quality Control Board recommended that the board issue a cease-and-desist order against the Irvine Co.
NEWS
January 27, 2000 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
In a sweeping effort to prevent Los Angeles County beaches from becoming more polluted as population grows, the region's water quality board Wednesday approved standards to require new building projects across the county to limit urban runoff that fouls ocean waters.
NEWS
November 16, 1991 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A costly cleanup of the long-besieged Santa Ana River was unanimously approved Friday by a regional water board, capping years of debate over how to resolve one of Southern California's most severe water pollution problems. Under the new plan, sewage plants in the Inland Empire must reduce nitrates in the millions of gallons of waste that flow daily into the river.
NEWS
June 3, 1991 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After five years of debate and delays in resolving one of Southern California's most severe water pollution problems, state officials are completing a cleanup strategy for the Santa Ana River that affects three counties and could cost half a billion dollars. A recently released report that took three years and $1 million to compile outlines the solutions, all of which are controversial and expensive.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|