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Santa Ana Work Center

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BUSINESS
January 24, 1996 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On one floor, you can get an assessment of your work skills. On another, counselors will help you with job training. And on another, you can file for unemployment benefits, then use the computers, phones, job postings and even borrow the office wardrobe to look for new work. Welcome to the Santa Ana Work Center, an experiment aimed at easing the often arduous journey of workers who have lost their jobs or are looking to change careers.
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BUSINESS
January 24, 1996 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On one floor, you can get an assessment of your work skills. On another, counselors will help you with job training. And on another, you can file for unemployment benefits, then use the computers, phones, job postings and even borrow the office wardrobe to look for new work. Welcome to the Santa Ana Work Center, an experiment aimed at easing the often arduous journey of workers who have lost their jobs or are looking to change careers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1997
The Orange County offices of the state Employment Development Department are offering a free summer job fair for youth Saturday. Applicants must bring Social Security cards and driver's licenses or state identification cards. Photocopies are not acceptable. Locations and times are: * Anaheim EDD office, 2420 E. Lincoln Ave., Suite B. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. * Garden Grove EDD office, 12661 Hoover St. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. * Santa Ana Work Center, 1000 Santa Ana Blvd. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1997 | JOHN CANALIS
The Orange County office of the state Employment Development Department is offering a summer job fair for youths at five locations Saturday. Participants can interview and apply for work with private and public employers. To qualify, applicants must bring a Social Security card and driver's license or state identification card. Copies of the documents are not acceptable, and neither are student IDs.
BUSINESS
January 27, 1996 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On one floor, you can get an assessment of your work skills. On another, counselors will help you with job training. And on another, you can file for unemployment benefits, then use the computers, phones, job postings and even borrow the office wardrobe to look for new work. Welcome to the Santa Ana Work Center, an experiment aimed at easing the often arduous journey of workers who have lost their jobs or are looking to change careers.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1997 | E. Scott Reckard
A federal job retraining grant of $748,650 was authorized Thursday for more than 300 Santa Ana workers being idled by the movement of a Mitsubishi Consumer Electronics television assembly plant to Mexico. Mitsubishi, which had assembled big-screen TVs in Santa Ana since 1978, said in January it was closing the plant because it can no longer compete in North America without cutting costs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 2001 | MAI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first surge in Santa Ana gang violence since the early 1990s comes at a particularly difficult time for the city, as its economy slows and officials are left with less money to fight gang crimes. After seeing a record drop in gang murders over the last decade, Santa Ana experienced a sharp rise during the first nine months of this year. From January to September, there were 10 gang murders--double the total for all of 2000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2005 | Jennifer Mena, Times Staff Writer
Before heading to his job as a machine operator, Danilo Perez perches in front of a computer screen glowing with an Excel spreadsheet. Perez, 44, is learning computer basics at the nonprofit Academia Computer Learning Center, which was opened in an office building in October by two high-tech specialists who want to close the gap between computer haves and have-nots among Spanish speakers.
NEWS
April 19, 1996 | JULIE BAWDEN DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Every time he picks up the phone, Ross Goo breaks expectations and stereotypes. As a male secretary in a female-dominated profession, Goo often encounters surprised callers. Visitors to the office also take a step back. After four years as an administrative assistant in the administration office at UC Irvine, Goo, 31, remains unfazed. He quickly and efficiently handles each call and chats with visitors as they wait to see one of his two supervisors.
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