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NEWS
May 20, 1989 | MILES CORWIN, Times Staff Writer
As a result of heightened concern about tanker collisions in the aftermath of the Exxon Valdez disaster in Alaska, three oil companies announced Friday that they will reroute their tankers outside the heavily traveled Santa Barbara Channel. Spokesmen for Chevron Corp., Mobil Oil Co. and Atlantic Richfield Co. said they will send their tankers outside the environmentally sensitive channel. But three other companies, including Exxon, have made no decision about changing the routing, which was requested by an area congressman.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2011 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from the Channel Islands -- Natalie Senyk and Ben Waltenberger peered out the bubble-shaped windows of the small research plane flying 1,000 feet over the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary and scanned the ocean surface for signs of life. On that bright, windy day earlier this month, the federal scientists were looking, in particular, for blow holes or the gigantic, gray outline of surfacing whales. Photos: Separating whales and ships The aerial survey is part of a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration mission to learn more about the movement of whales and to devise ways to keep them away from the container ships, fishing vessels, barges and sailboats that have been colliding with them at a rate of six a year in California.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Prompted by the recent deaths of three blue whales, an environmental group has asked for federal imposition of a speed limit on freighters and tankers in the Santa Barbara Channel. A limit of 10 knots would make fewer collisions lethal and give whales more time to elude danger, according to the Center for Biological Diversity. It has been confirmed that two of the dead whales collided with ships, and it is suspected that the third also did.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2010 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
Idled fishermen, oil-slathered pelicans, tar balls washing up on beaches: The daily deluge of sad images from the Gulf of Mexico aren't exactly a choice backdrop for a pro-oil political campaign, especially in an environmentally sensitive California beach town. But on June 8, just seven weeks after the deadly explosion on the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig, Carpinteria voters will decide on an oil company's bid to expand its operations in the Santa Barbara Channel. If it succeeds, an initiative by Denver-based Venoco Inc. will pave the way for an onshore drilling rig that would extend pipes into the ocean floor and suck out as many as 11,000 barrels of oil a day. Located at a facility Venoco has owned since 1999, the initial exploratory rig would be about 17 stories tall and stay in place for up to a year.
NEWS
April 6, 1989 | JOHN HANKINS
A catastrophic oil spill is almost inevitable in the Santa Barbara Channel in the next decade, and the present ability of the oil companies and the state and federal governments to contain it is dubious, a report prepared for the Santa Barbara County Energy Division says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1999 | MATT SURMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If ever there was a sea monster, this is it. It slices through the water in sections, too huge to be seen all at once. First, the massive arch of its back emerges from the water. Next, its comparatively tiny dorsal fin eases by. And then, its 15-foot tail shoots out of the water and hovers for a few seconds, as if waving goodbye before slipping back down below.
NEWS
May 3, 1996 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
An estimated 2,000 gallons of crude oil spilled Thursday morning from an Exxon Co. oil platform in the Santa Barbara Channel, fouling a 20-mile stretch of offshore waters. Cleanup crews dispatched by Exxon set up booms that seemed to contain the slick, and skimmers are sucking up the oil under the oversight of the Coast Guard and state officials.
SPORTS
August 9, 1994 | PETE THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stephanie Le Chat looks out over the bow of the 88-foot Condor and can hardly believe her eyes. "There is no beauty quite like that of the sea," she says. It has been quite a week for Le Chat, 29. She came from Europe to be married in Las Vegas, traveled to Arizona, where she met members of the Navajo tribe, and now finds herself surrounded by creatures both wild and wonderful. She, her husband, Patrick, and 50 others lining the rails of Capt.
BUSINESS
October 10, 1989 | PATRICK LEE, Times Staff Writer
A consortium of oil companies led by Chevron U.S.A. sued the California Coastal Commission for permission to transport oil by tanker from Chevron's operations at Point Arguello to its refinery in El Segundo, the company said Monday. The suit is the latest action by the company in its decade-long effort to produce oil from a 300-million-barrel field off Santa Barbara County, a project that the company estimated has cost the consortium about $2 billion without producing a drop of crude.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2008 | Steve Chawkins, Chawkins is a Times staff writer.
Cleanup crews in the Santa Barbara Channel on Monday mopped up an oil slick a mile-and-a-half long and 200 feet wide -- a comparatively small leak from the same drilling platform where a 1969 oil disaster triggered the modern environmental movement.
BUSINESS
May 12, 2010 | Michael Hiltzik
It isn't just the waters of the Gulf of Mexico that have been turned murky by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Consider its impact on California's offshore waters. Specifically, an undersea formation in the Santa Barbara Channel known as Tranquillon Ridge. During the last couple of years, three Santa Barbara environmental groups worked out a deal with a big offshore drilling company under which the driller would dismantle four offshore rigs under federal jurisdiction in return for the right to extend its drilling temporarily into state waters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2009 | Associated Press
A judge ruled against an environmental group in a lawsuit that sought to force the U.S. Coast Guard to better protect blue whales after several were killed by ships in the Santa Barbara Channel off Southern California. U.S. District Judge Maxine Chesney rejected an argument by the Center for Biological Diversity that the Coast Guard should comply with the Endangered Species Act when it regulates ship traffic. Chesney issued a summary judgment Monday in San Francisco. The judge said the Coast Guard's daily management of shipping traffic does not by itself trigger Endangered Species Act requirements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2008 | Steve Chawkins, Chawkins is a Times staff writer.
Cleanup crews in the Santa Barbara Channel on Monday mopped up an oil slick a mile-and-a-half long and 200 feet wide -- a comparatively small leak from the same drilling platform where a 1969 oil disaster triggered the modern environmental movement.
REAL ESTATE
October 14, 2007 | Ruth Ryon, Times Staff Writer
AT first glance, the setting of this house may conjure up the Italian countryside. It was designed to capture the feeling of Villa d'Este, a fine old hotel near Lake Como. The hotel was built as a private residence in 1568. This house, Terra Bella, was built four years ago, yet much of it -- with its many handcrafted details -- looks as if it was built more than four centuries ago. Interiors were completed by Lory Johansson of Ergo Design Works.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Prompted by the recent deaths of three blue whales, an environmental group has asked for federal imposition of a speed limit on freighters and tankers in the Santa Barbara Channel. A limit of 10 knots would make fewer collisions lethal and give whales more time to elude danger, according to the Center for Biological Diversity. It has been confirmed that two of the dead whales collided with ships, and it is suspected that the third also did.
NATIONAL
September 9, 2007 | TINA DAUNT
Santa Barbara Over the years, dozens of celebrities and authors have been the happy beneficiaries of what Hollywood likes to call "the Oprah effect." Saturday, it was Barack Obama's turn to enjoy billionaire chat diva Oprah Winfrey's favor, as a stunning cross section of the country's entertainment and sports elite gathered in "the meadow" of her sprawling Montecito estate to raise money for the junior Illinois senator seeking the Democrats' presidential nomination.
NEWS
March 25, 1993 | LEO SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was the culmination of two years of anticipation when a group of visually impaired students from Ventura County gathered at the Ventura Harbor, boarded an Island Packers charter boat and headed out for a day in the Santa Barbara Channel. The 17 students, ages 5 to 14, came from the Oxnard, El Rio, Hueneme, Oceanview and Pleasant Valley school districts. And only two had ever been out on the water before. While the students were on the water, several whales played nearby.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2001 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Can a burp from the Earth sink a ship? Some scientists believe so, suggesting that explosive releases of methane from the sea floor could explain the so-called Bermuda Triangle, where scores of ships and planes are said to have disappeared in the Western Atlantic. The discovery of a sunken trawler near craters in the North Sea fed speculation last year that a British version of the baffling phenomenon had been found.
FOOD
September 5, 2007 | Betty Hallock, Times Staff Writer
Jason Tuley stands in the middle of a sun-drenched farm field on an early Saturday morning in Los Olivos, Calif., holding a fat, dappled squash in one hand and a long, red noodle bean in the other. He tucks the squash under an arm, snaps the sturdy 18-inch-long bean in half and takes a bite. He looks at it askance for a second or two, then says, "That's one of those ones you have to think about for a few days before you cook with it."
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