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NEWS
March 10, 1993 | KATHLEEN SHARP, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Four months after an election to decide political control over growth along the Santa Barbara coast, people here still do not know who won the pivotal 3rd District seat on the county Board of Supervisors. Rancher Willy Chamberlin was sworn into office in January, believing he had narrowly won the race by defeating Bill Wallace, the chairman of the Board of Supervisors.
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NEWS
March 10, 1993 | KATHLEEN SHARP, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Four months after an election to decide political control over growth along the Santa Barbara coast, people here still do not know who won the pivotal 3rd District seat on the county Board of Supervisors. Rancher Willy Chamberlin was sworn into office in January, believing he had narrowly won the race by defeating Bill Wallace, the chairman of the Board of Supervisors.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1996 | NICK GREEN
A public workshop in Port Hueneme tonight will address the problem of beach erosion in Ventura and Santa Barbara counties. Government officials hope the workshop will lead to a yearlong, $400,000 shoreline reconnaissance study by the Army Corps of Engineers to assess the extent of erosion and propose solutions. "We're losing our beaches," said Jerry Nowak, executive director of a joint powers authority formed in 1987 by the two counties and five cities to protect and maintain public beaches.
NEWS
January 12, 1995 | RICHARD PADDOCK and RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Armed with shovels, rain gear and a fresh federal declaration of disaster, Californians on Wednesday began digging out from the most recent spate of storms as they cast wary eyes to a horizon teeming with more rain-bearing clouds. Throughout the state--half of which was formally declared a disaster area by President Clinton--residents crept beyond police blockades to glimpse the devastation. The luckier ones, who made it back to homes and businesses, found them filled with mud and debris.
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