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April 22, 1990 | WALTER HOUK
GRACIE ALLEN'S line, "No wonder they call them elephants; they're so big," also works when referring to a 4-ton, 16-foot-long bull elephant seal. On the brink of extinction a century ago, these bulky animals are once again flourishing--on the beaches of a dozen islands, five of them off Southern California. Island Packers has boat service to two of these islands, Santa Barbara and San Miguel, both in Channel Islands National Park starting in May.
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TRAVEL
June 29, 2008
I share your passion for the Channel Islands ("Offshore Eden," June 22). I am fortunate to have a boat in Channel Islands Harbor, so I often visit the northern islands, perhaps the most "Galapagos-like" of the bunch. California Secretary for Resources Michael Chrisman and I are working on some ideas to help the Catalina Island Conservancy with the challenges they face with a significant amount of public visitors and continued threats to native plants on the island. There also will be significant changes in the marine-protected areas as we evaluate the entire coastline south of Point Conception to the Mexican border.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1994 | CHARLES HILLINGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Beth Fulsom is the only human being on tiny, exotic Santa Barbara Island, 47 miles out to sea from Ventura. But she isn't alone. She shares the one-square-mile, wind-swept, treeless island with 160,000 beady-eyed deer mice, thousands of sea gulls, pelicans and other sea birds and more than 1,000 sea lions. Fulsom, 33, has one of the most remote outposts of any ranger in the National Park Service. "I'm here by choice," the 12-year Park Service veteran said. "I love the island.
NEWS
December 30, 2003 | Deborah Schoch, Times Staff Writer
On the hottest day of the year, a chilly wind whips across the boat speeding south from Ventura. Cathy Schwemm, a veteran of such voyages, keeps her balance on the tilting deck as other spray-dampened passengers grab at railings and poles. She has come dressed for lizard hunting: brown hair pushed under a sun hat, water bottle strapped to her waist. With bare feet shoved into Tevas instead of hiking boots, she is clearly unfazed by the specter of rampaging lizards. Only one kind of lizard lives on Santa Barbara Island, and that's plenty.
NEWS
May 6, 1994 | BARBARA BRONSON GRAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Barbara Bronson Gray is a regular contributor to The Times
Now this is a place far from the madding crowd. A day trip to Santa Barbara Island is a seagoing adventure and a challenging trip to a relatively untouched part of California. The excursion takes three hours each way and demands enough energy once there for either a five-mile, ranger-guided nature walk or independent exploration of the plateaus, steep cliffs, snorkeling and diving areas, and many hiking trails.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1993 | CHARLES HILLINGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of the smallest--and destined to be among the least-visited--museums in California and perhaps anywhere in America has opened on a wind-swept, treeless, one-square-mile island 47 miles southwest of Ventura. Fewer than 500 boaters and passengers a year go ashore on remote Santa Barbara Island, one of five that make up Channel Islands National Park. But now, those who make the trip will find the $40,000 Santa Barbara Island Museum, dedicated Oct. 23.
TRAVEL
June 29, 2008
I share your passion for the Channel Islands ("Offshore Eden," June 22). I am fortunate to have a boat in Channel Islands Harbor, so I often visit the northern islands, perhaps the most "Galapagos-like" of the bunch. California Secretary for Resources Michael Chrisman and I are working on some ideas to help the Catalina Island Conservancy with the challenges they face with a significant amount of public visitors and continued threats to native plants on the island. There also will be significant changes in the marine-protected areas as we evaluate the entire coastline south of Point Conception to the Mexican border.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1988
This is in reference to a letter written by John Andrews (Times, April 22) about trees in Palos Verdes reaching for the sky. He must have been on my street in the older section of Lunada Bay. We have lived here 18 years and have seen our ocean view dwindle to almost no ocean view. We could see Catalina, a large part of the ocean and Santa Barbara Island, but with the variety of trees up to 60 feet high, we have a very small ocean view which will be gone soon. We would welcome some kind of view protection ordinance in Palos Verdes.
NEWS
January 11, 1994 | CHARLES HILLINGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Beth Fulsom is the only human being on tiny, exotic Santa Barbara Island, 47 miles off Ventura. But she isn't alone. She shares one-square-mile, wind-swept, treeless island with 160,000 beady-eyed deer mice, thousands of sea gulls, pelicans and other sea birds and more than 1,000 sea lions. Fulsom, 33, has one of the most remote outposts of any ranger in the National Park Service. "I'm here by choice," the 12-year Park Service veteran said. "I love the island.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1998 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR
During the past two centuries, Indians, hermits, explorers and military men have traversed the rolling hills and jagged rocks of the Channel Islands. In his new book, "Charles Hillinger's Channel Islands," the former Los Angeles Times reporter relates the stories of the colorful characters who have lived on these rugged islands off the coast of Southern California. Hillinger will hold his first book-signing at Borders Books and Music in Thousand Oaks today at 7 p.m.
MAGAZINE
March 17, 1996 | Frank Clifford, Staff writer Frank Clifford covers environmental issues for The Times. His last article for the magazine was on the changing American West
"YA HA! . . . YA HO!" One voice, then another and another rise in salutation from the summit. "Alleluia. Alleluia," proclaims a woman in flowing white robes, kneeling, her hands opened toward the rising sun. With shouts, prayers and hymns, Sae-Ook Song and members of his Griffith Park Alpine Hiking Club greet the dawn from atop Mt. Hollywood. One by one, several families of coyotes pipe up, rousting birds and other inhabitants with their screwball reveille. A red-tailed hawk launches itself over Dante's View, a palm and eucalyptus grove on the path to the mountaintop.
NEWS
October 30, 1995 | TIM MAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The night before plunging into dark green ocean waters to swim with the sea lions, Aram Kadish had a lot to think about. Armed with nothing more than a snorkel, a wet suit and a sense of curiosity, he would be cavorting with hordes of the quarter-ton sea mammals. "I get up and go to work every day and I see these guys who can't even walk," said Kadish, 32, an occupational therapist at the Cerebral Palsy / Spastic Children's Foundation in Van Nuys.
NEWS
May 6, 1994 | BARBARA BRONSON GRAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Barbara Bronson Gray is a regular contributor to The Times
Now this is a place far from the madding crowd. A day trip to Santa Barbara Island is a seagoing adventure and a challenging trip to a relatively untouched part of California. The excursion takes three hours each way and demands enough energy once there for either a five-mile, ranger-guided nature walk or independent exploration of the plateaus, steep cliffs, snorkeling and diving areas, and many hiking trails.
NEWS
January 11, 1994 | CHARLES HILLINGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Beth Fulsom is the only human being on tiny, exotic Santa Barbara Island, 47 miles off Ventura. But she isn't alone. She shares one-square-mile, wind-swept, treeless island with 160,000 beady-eyed deer mice, thousands of sea gulls, pelicans and other sea birds and more than 1,000 sea lions. Fulsom, 33, has one of the most remote outposts of any ranger in the National Park Service. "I'm here by choice," the 12-year Park Service veteran said. "I love the island.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1994 | CHARLES HILLINGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Beth Fulsom is the only human being on tiny, exotic Santa Barbara Island, 47 miles out to sea from Ventura. But she isn't alone. She shares the one-square-mile, wind-swept, treeless island with 160,000 beady-eyed deer mice, thousands of sea gulls, pelicans and other sea birds and more than 1,000 sea lions. Fulsom, 33, has one of the most remote outposts of any ranger in the National Park Service. "I'm here by choice," the 12-year Park Service veteran said. "I love the island.
NEWS
January 19, 1985
A 63-year-old Hawthorne man missing on a solitary fishing trip was found injured and semi-coherent on a remote, rocky Santa Barbara Island beach Friday afternoon after two days and nights of an intense air and sea search. Robert Pullen Sr., who set out from Marina del Rey Wednesday morning and failed to return as scheduled that evening, was discovered lying on a life jacket near the debris of his 18-foot power boat, the Jeanie, by two Channel Islands National Park rangers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1990 | KIRSTEN LEE SWARTZ
Although the Channel Islands National Park Service does not yet offer cruises to its historic shipwrecks, divers can contact commercial dive boat operations to visit them. Weather conditions are ideal during the late summer and early autumn. Parts of the Winfield Scott, Aggi and Goldenhorn can be viewed from the surface by snorkelers. Anacapa Island: The Labor, a 22-foot tuna fishing boat used in the 1920s, drifted into rocks on the south side of the island when its anchor broke in 1924.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1993 | CHARLES HILLINGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of the smallest--and destined to be among the least-visited--museums in California and perhaps anywhere in America has opened on a wind-swept, treeless, one-square-mile island 47 miles southwest of Ventura. Fewer than 500 boaters and passengers a year go ashore on remote Santa Barbara Island, one of five that make up Channel Islands National Park. But now, those who make the trip will find the $40,000 Santa Barbara Island Museum, dedicated Oct. 23.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1990 | KIRSTEN LEE SWARTZ
Although the Channel Islands National Park Service does not yet offer cruises to its historic shipwrecks, divers can contact commercial dive boat operations to visit them. Weather conditions are ideal during the late summer and early autumn. Parts of the Winfield Scott, Aggi and Goldenhorn can be viewed from the surface by snorkelers. Anacapa Island: The Labor, a 22-foot tuna fishing boat used in the 1920s, drifted into rocks on the south side of the island when its anchor broke in 1924.
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