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October 5, 1992 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
The Santa Barbara Museum of Art has received a donation of 175 works of art from the estate of Wright S. Ludington. The bequest includes oil paintings by major Impressionist and modern artists, modern bronze sculptures, a group of Luristan bronzes and rare Roman sculptures and architectural fragments. A prominent art collector and founding member of the museum, Ludington lived in Santa Barbara from 1927 until his death in May at age 91.
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March 6, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
SANTA BARBARA - Michelle Stuart and Alice Aycock are very different artists. Stuart is a kind of cartographer, mapping not just the land but our intimate experience of it. Aycock is more literary, transforming familiar themes like the intrusion of technology into nature and society's spiritual discontents into sculptures that are sometimes participatory. However, the juxtaposition of two sizable, retrospective exhibitions of their drawings at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art is fortuitous.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2000 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You know things are not status quo at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art this summer from the get go. Parked on the landing in front of the museum's normally stately entrance on State Street is a bulbous old car, painted silver and fitted with numerous television sets in its windows. This is the turf of famed video and conceptual artist Nam June Paik, the Korean emigre who has been creating engaging and meaningful art out of TV sets since the 1960s.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2012 | By Allan M. Jalon
SANTA BARBARA - Chinese scrolls often show landscapes of mountains, deep-cut gorges and paths that spiral through them and past caves in foliage. On these paths, often barely visible, smallish robed figures walk alone or sit in a group. Even people relatively familiar with this kind of art have peered at the finely drawn figures and wondered: Who are they? What are they up to? The Santa Barbara Museum of Art is offering an unusually comprehensive answer to such questions with a far-reaching show called "The Artful Recluse: Painting, Poetry, and Politics in 17th Century China.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1998 | Suzanne Muchnic, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
Arriving in the wake of President Clinton's visit to China, "Eternal China: Splendors From the First Dynasties" which opens Tuesday at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, appears to be a case of perfect timing.
NEWS
January 31, 1991 | MAJA RADEVICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It started 75 years ago as a great place to store eggs. These days the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History is known for its many collections, exhibits, educational programs, research and public forums on topics ranging from animals to astronomy, plants to the life of the Chumash Indians. The museum's beginnings date to Jan. 31, 1916, when William Leon Dawson and several prominent Santa Barbarans met to establish the Museum of Comparative Oology for the collection and study of bird eggs.
NEWS
December 15, 1994 | FRANCIA GAUNT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Exotic, pagan unfathomable. If you are anything like me, these are words you would use to describe the objects that constitute a pre-Columbian art exhibit. Add exceedingly erudite text and descriptions and you have the all-too-typical and oh-so-forgettable museum experience that many of us have come to expect. Then again, as fascinated as we Westerners are with distant and ancient cultures, we don't necessarily want our exotica served up too familiarly. It would lose its appeal.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1995 | Suzanne Muchnic, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
Call it proof of American art's rising status. Or call it one more example of a budget-conscious museum focusing on its own artworks instead of costly imported exhibitions. The Santa Barbara Museum of Art's reinstallation of American art from its permanent collection, unveiled last week, is definitely attuned to national trends. But it's also a celebration of this collection's distinctive personality and increasing riches.
NEWS
June 9, 1994 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Before Bugs Bunny, Roger Rabbit, Harvey, the Playboy Bunny and maybe even the Easter Bunny (nobody knows when the Easter Bunny showed up--I called the library), there was Peter Rabbit. The work of Beatrix Potter, this wascally wabbit's literary mom, is featured in an exhibition at the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History called "The World of Peter Rabbit." The exhibition, which includes a re-creation of Mr.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2002 | SUSAN EMERLING
When Mexican muralist and Communist agitator David Alfaro Siqueiros came to Los Angeles in 1932, he was a man on a mission. His goal in L.A., he wrote in his notebook, was to create "the great uncovered mural painting in the free air, facing the sun, facing the rain, for the masses." It is no small irony that of the three murals Siqueiros painted during his eight-month stay here, only "Delivery of the Mexican Bourgeoisie Born of the Revolution in the Hands of Imperialism" (a.k.a.
TRAVEL
January 16, 2011
One more deal in Santa Barbara Thanks to Rosemary McClure for spotlighting the charms of Santa Barbara that are affordable ["Santa Barbara on a Budget," Jan. 9]. A day at Stearns Wharf can give you million-dollar views for the price of parking, not to mention delicious seafood and entertaining pelicans. One affordable restaurant McClure needs to include in her list is the locals' favorite, Farmer Boy on State Street. This is a must for our family, featuring homemade American and Latino favorites for breakfast and lunch.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2010 | By Scarlet Cheng, Special to the Los Angeles Times
With the end of martial law in South Korea in 1987, the arts recovered independent voices. One art form that took off was photography, and 10 years ago when Karen Sinsheimer, photography curator at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, saw a special exhibition of contemporary Korean photography at Fotofest in Houston, she was electrified. Later she and Anne Wilkes Tucker, her counterpart at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, agreed on a collaboration. The result, "Chaotic Harmony: Contemporary Korean Photography" (at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art through Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2009 | Scarlet Cheng
The tomb raiders dug down 30 feet into Mawangdui -- a mound in Hunan, China, long known as a burial site for ancient nobility -- but they missed the mark. At some point they did find, and loot, the nearby tombs of her husband, the Marquis of Dai, and their son, but hers was the larger one, and more luxurious. That is because Lady Dai, as she is now known, outlived both of them and had more time to prepare for her trip to the afterlife. In 1972, more than 2,000 years after her death in 163 BC, Lady Dai was finally discovered.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2008 | Christopher Knight, Times Art Critic
When warriors from the famous Chinese terra cotta army buried with Emperor Qin Shi Huang (259-210 BC) came to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 1987, they numbered three. When they came to the Santa Barbara Museum of Art in 1998, they numbered a dozen. And when they arrive in Santa Ana at the Bowers Museum on Sunday in "Terra Cotta Warriors: Guardians of China's First Emperor," the troops will have grown to about 20. More than 1,000 of the life-size sculptures are still back in Xi'an, but the Bowers plans to provide context with an additional 100 ancient Chinese works from the period (bowers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2007 | Gregory W. Griggs, Times Staff Writer
Moorpark officials may have found a final resting place for the skeleton of a fossilized mammoth that roamed the area up to 1 million years ago. If the City Council approves the plan next week, the skeletal pieces will be donated to the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History. Hugh Riley, assistant city manager, said the museum beat out the larger Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County because of its enthusiasm for creating a public exhibit.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2003 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
After decades of waiting in the wings to do an occasional star turn, Latin American art is edging onto center stage at mainstream museums. From New England to Southern California, institutions that pride themselves on geographic diversity but primarily focus on Europe and North America are paying more attention to the art of Central and South America.
NEWS
December 9, 1993 | LEO SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Whales and dolphins will share the spotlight Friday in a three-part presentationat the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History. First, Jean-Michel Cousteau will present his new film "The Secret Societies of Dolphins and Whales," in which he visits with dolphins in the Bahamas, finds pilot whale skeletons inside a cave in Fiji, and tracks humpbacks from Hawaii to Alaska.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2009 | Scarlet Cheng
The tomb raiders dug down 30 feet into Mawangdui -- a mound in Hunan, China, long known as a burial site for ancient nobility -- but they missed the mark. At some point they did find, and loot, the nearby tombs of her husband, the Marquis of Dai, and their son, but hers was the larger one, and more luxurious. That is because Lady Dai, as she is now known, outlived both of them and had more time to prepare for her trip to the afterlife. In 1972, more than 2,000 years after her death in 163 BC, Lady Dai was finally discovered.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2003 | David Pagel, Special to The Times
Reality isn't what it used to be. Neither is Realism, a style of art that once promised to tell the truth about modern life, often by confronting viewers with point-blank views of its ugly underbelly. At UC Santa Barbara's Art Museum, "Social Strategies: Redefining Social Realism" asks interesting questions about art's relationship to reality. Unfortunately, the sketchy survey falls short of answering them in a satisfying fashion.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2002
The removal of the Siqueiros mural -- "Portrait of Mexico Today, 1932" -- from its original location in Pacific Palisades to the Santa Barbara Museum of Art earlier this year is to be profoundly regretted ("A Wall on the Fly," Oct. 6). His only other surviving work in L.A. -- "America Tropical" -- has been the object of intense efforts over the last decade by the Getty Conservation Institute to conserve it in situ. By contrast, the small, private and discrete "Portrait of Mexico Today, 1932" has largely avoided public attention, with seemingly few objections being raised to its removal and shipment to Santa Barbara.
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