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Santa Barbara Olive Co

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August 9, 1989 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
The company was started in a one-car garage in Santa Barbara six years ago. Now, the olives it produces are sold in all 50 states and in several foreign countries. Jars of the 37 different kinds of spiced and stuffed olives produced by the Santa Barbara Olive Co. are found in gourmet shops, supermarkets and restaurants coast to coast--as well as in stores such as Neiman Marcus, Macy's and Harrods in London.
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BUSINESS
August 9, 1989 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
The company was started in a one-car garage in Santa Barbara six years ago. Now, the olives it produces are sold in all 50 states and in several foreign countries. Jars of the 37 different kinds of spiced and stuffed olives produced by the Santa Barbara Olive Co. are found in gourmet shops, supermarkets and restaurants coast to coast--as well as in stores such as Neiman Marcus, Macy's and Harrods in London.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1996 | JASON TERADA
The Ventura County Medical Resource Foundation invites local connoisseurs of gourmet food, fine wines and premium beer to its 11th annual Lakeside Party fund-raiser Sunday at Lake Casitas. Directors of the foundation, which raises money to support programs at the Ventura County Medical Center and related facilities, said this year's event is more important than ever because the hospital recently incurred funding cuts totaling more than $1 million. The event, from noon to 5 p.m.
FOOD
July 26, 1990 | BARBARA HANSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mediterranean chefs live and die by their choice of olive oil. At least that's what chef James Sly says. He should know: Earlier this summer, Sly, executive chef of Santa Barbara's El Encanto Hotel, won the classic division of a bouillabaisse contest at the Brander Vineyard in Los Olivos. His winning entry was a soup infused with olive oil. But Sly didn't use a European olive oil; he went for the extra virgin olive oil produced by the Santa Barbara Olive Co.
NEWS
September 27, 1990 | PETER C. BENNETT, Bennett is a Los Angeles writer.
Cliff Graber, president of the Graber Olive House in Ontario, surfs, skis and skateboards with the reckless abandon of a teen-ager. He'll be 53 in December. Edna Bachstein has helped four generations of Grabers pick, pickle and pack their famous tree-ripened Manzanillo olives. At 91, she's still on the job. So are Marguerite Larned, 77, and Inez Bjorkman, 67, who together have 85 years of service with the company.
FOOD
July 26, 1990 | ROSE DOSTI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The national olive oil business has been growing at a phenomenal rate--about 20% a year. Why the sudden surge? "In the early days," explained Jaan Sulg, vice president of operations at Pompeian Inc., a brand available in the United States since 1908, "the country was not in a health mode, and manufacturers made no effort to advertise olive oil."
FOOD
February 26, 1987 | MINNIE BERNARDINO, Times Staff Writer
It was more than an affair to expose and release gummy bears, tarantulas and dinosaurs. The three-day activity was also a dynamic show-and-tell opportunity for an enterprising entrepreneur who swears by his mother's cookie recipe, or an Italian aunt's pasta secret, Grandma's jam . . . a unique mushroom or escargot farm. The marketplace was at the Anaheim Convention Center, which held the 12th Winter International Fancy Food and Confection Show last week. Sponsored by the National Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2007 | Larry Gordon, Times Staff Writer
Take 130 trees dropping olives on campus walkways. Add in students seeking prankish respite from their studies. Mix in a French-born university president with a taste for Mediterranean cuisine. That's the formula for making olive oil at Caltech. The institution better known for rocket science is launching its own brand of the golden kitchen condiment, produced from the trees on its Pasadena campus. A minor flood -- upward of 300 gallons -- is expected this fall.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2003 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
Like millions nationwide, Craig Makela will be ringing in the new year with the traditional champagne toast. Before the clock strikes midnight, though, he and his guests will be closing out 2003 with a perennial favorite: martinis. At Makela's house in Santa Barbara, the martinis will be dressed up with olives. That make sense, because Makela's family has grown olives in nearby Gaviota for more than 150 years. And lately, America's cocktail craze has his tiny Santa Barbara Olive Co. drinking in strong sales of its more than 100 condiments, from green olives stuffed with pickled onions for martini lovers who can't decide to spicy asparagus spears as celery alternatives in Bloody Marys.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2007 | Larry Gordon, Times Staff Writer
Caltech put aside astrophysics and supercomputer technology Friday for an earthier and more pungent obsession: harvesting from campus olive trees and turning the crop into golden oil. Across the Pasadena school, students, faculty and staff climbed 16-foot-high ladders and rode a couple of cherry-pickers to grab the black and green fruit from about 70 trees and dump it into buckets.
FOOD
September 9, 1993 | DANIEL P. PUZO
The world's largest olives grow in turn-of-the-century orchards bordering Northern California farm towns such as Oroville, Palermo and Richvale. An estimated 8,000 acres of Sevillano trees yield a variety that is marketed--in agricultural hyperbole--as "jumbo," "colossal" and even " super colossal."
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