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February 24, 2005 | Don Shirley
A new professional theater, Santa Barbara Theatre Company, will serve as a sister troupe to Hollywood's 78-seat Fountain Theatre, officials of the new company announced Wednesday. The artistic directors of the Santa Barbara group will be the Fountain's Stephen Sachs -- who will retain his position as co-artistic director of the Fountain -- and Asaad Kelada, a director whose highest-profile theatrical gig in L.A.
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NEWS
February 24, 2005 | Don Shirley
A new professional theater, Santa Barbara Theatre Company, will serve as a sister troupe to Hollywood's 78-seat Fountain Theatre, officials of the new company announced Wednesday. The artistic directors of the Santa Barbara group will be the Fountain's Stephen Sachs -- who will retain his position as co-artistic director of the Fountain -- and Asaad Kelada, a director whose highest-profile theatrical gig in L.A.
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NEWS
August 20, 1992
The bilingual Inlakech Theatre Company of Oxnard will host the Fourth Annual Califas Chicano/Latino Theatre Festival Friday through Sunday at sites in Oxnard and Ventura. The event will feature performances by nine groups from California and Mexico as well as workshops, demonstrations and critiques on the diverse and unique aspects of Chicano/Latino theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2006 | Philip Brandes, Special to The Times
A gleaming black granite scar carved into the grassy Mall in Washington, D.C., the Vietnam Veterans Memorial evokes both a painful reminder of a war that once divided our nation and a meditative prayer for healing. Yet anyone who's visited the wall knows that its most devastating impact lies in the expanse of notes, letters, photos and other mementos left each day for loved ones whose names are engraved in the list of casualties.
NEWS
November 30, 2006 | Philip Brandes, Special to The Times
WE all deplore intolerance -- except when it comes to our own prejudices, of course. Yet even the most deeply entrenched biases can give way to understanding and reconciliation, a hopeful possibility explored in Jeff Baron's warmhearted 1998 comedy "Visiting Mr. Green."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2003 | Philip Brandes, Special to The Times
"A man can be faithful to himself or to other people -- but not to both." So goes the self-serving defense that bigamous antihero Lyman Felt offers for his bottomless, destructive egotism in Arthur Miller's "The Ride Down Mt. Morgan." First performed in 1991, Miller's late-career comedy-drama finally makes its Southland debut in a staging from Santa Barbara's Ensemble Theatre Company that proves generally capable, but rough around its nuanced edges.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2007 | Philip Brandes, Special to The Times
"People should be honest with each other every 12 years or so," says the disappointed wife at the center of an edgy interracial love triangle in Neil LaBute's sharp-edged comedy "This Is How It Goes." Fat chance.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2009 | Philip Brandes
Ostensibly a sharp-edged satiric portrait of a marriage ripped apart by infidelity, Theresa Rebeck's savvy if sometimes formulaic comedy, "The Scene," cuts a broader swath through layers of betrayal in contemporary show business. Art Manke's smart, sexy staging for Santa Barbara's Ensemble Theatre Company pulls no punches with Rebeck's four-character immorality tale. Its focal point is Charlie (David Nevell), a bright, arrogant and, naturally, unemployed New York actor whose disdain for artistic compromise comes cheap -- he's been living off the income of his wife, Stella (Colette Kilroy)
NEWS
July 8, 1993 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The extravagant personalities of the theater world have always been a natural target for comedy about human excess--high-strung directors, prima donna performers and loud but loaded producers need little embellishment to provide onstage amusement. The associated pitfall is getting bogged down with too many in-jokes to appeal to any audience but fellow theater people.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2006 | Philip Brandes, Special to The Times
It's Christmas Eve, but yuletide and its rituals hold out little hope of redemption for John Plunkett, the alcoholic undertaker's assistant confronting the demons of his past in Conor McPherson's beautifully written "Dublin Carol." A grittier, downbeat rejoinder to the Scrooge fable, this "Carol's" deceptively spare character study rewards close attention with poignant insights into a troubled soul, in a capable albeit low-key staging from Santa Barbara's Ensemble Theatre Company.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2008 | Philip Brandes, Special to The Times
Getting away with murder is nice work if you can get it -- or is it? The psychic consequences of unpunished crime so fascinated Emile Zola that he made it the focus of his first success, "Therese Raquin."
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