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NEWS
May 30, 2011 | By Terry Gardner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Young fans of the movie “How to Train Your Dragon” will want to catch the new show at the Santa Barbara Zoo, in which a Tyrannosaurus Rex demonstrates how animals can be trained to receive special care at the zoo. Duncan the dinosaur stars in “ How to Train Your Dinosaur, ” in which hosts use the robo dino to show families how the zoo’s animals receive care, including how the creatures let trainers brush their teeth. This lifelike T. Rex is 15 ½ -feet long from nose to tail and 7 feet tall.  It was created by the Chiodo Brothers , a Hollywood creature shop, and Duncan can run, roar, snort, growl, sneeze, blink and even, um, take a comfort break with the help of the operator inside, who controls his actions.  In the 15-minute show, Duncan allows his teeth to be brushed with a giant toothbrush.
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NEWS
May 29, 2013 | By Isabella Alsobrook
Summer is almost here, which means that food festival season is upon us.  Here is a chronological list of some of Los Angeles' summer food events. Zoo Brew: The Santa Barbara Zoo's fourth annual Zoo Brew on Saturday features beer tastings from a herd of breweries. The ticket includes zoo admissions and unlimited tastings from 3 to 6 p.m. 500 Niños Drive, Santa Barbara, (805) 962-5339. Casa Pacifica Food and Wine Festival : This event, Sunday from 1 to 5 p.m. at the California State University Channel Islands campus, hosts local wineries, breweries, restaurants, live entertainment and the largest silent auction in Ventura County.  The proceeds will benefit Casa Pacifica Centers of Children and Families , a crisis-care and treatment facility for abused and at-risk children in Ventura and Santa Barbara counties.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2011 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Santa Barbara -- It started with the toucans. Nobody knew why the birds were making such a terrible racket but soon it became clear. A bald eagle had winged its way into the Santa Barbara Zoo and started evidencing great interest in some of the zoo's smaller, perhaps more delectable, inhabitants. He swooped low over the flamingos and perched on a rooftop just above the achingly cute meerkats, waiting. He showed no fear of humans. "At first we were thrilled to see it," said Sheri Horiszny, the zoo's director of animal programs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2011 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Santa Barbara -- It started with the toucans. Nobody knew why the birds were making such a terrible racket but soon it became clear. A bald eagle had winged its way into the Santa Barbara Zoo and started evidencing great interest in some of the zoo's smaller, perhaps more delectable, inhabitants. He swooped low over the flamingos and perched on a rooftop just above the achingly cute meerkats, waiting. He showed no fear of humans. "At first we were thrilled to see it," said Sheri Horiszny, the zoo's director of animal programs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1997
A pair of loris monkeys, recuperating for the last two months at the Center Animal Hospital, will be donated to the Santa Barbara Zoo. The monkeys were picked up in May by animal control officers who were summoned by sheriff's deputies inspecting a Hawthorne apartment after an eviction. The deputies found the monkeys in a cage stashed inside a closet, said Ken Roybal of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.
NEWS
April 3, 2000 | From Associated Press
Blood, a broken feather and shell casings are the only clues to the theft of three eagles from their cages at the Santa Barbara Zoo. Between 11 p.m. Friday and 1 a.m. Saturday, someone cut a hole in the zoo's chain-link fence, avoided security, broke the cage locks and fled with a bald eagle and two golden eagles, said Rich Block, zoo director. Blood found in the cages was determined to be bird blood, he said.
NEWS
June 21, 1990 | JANE HULSE
You've heard the one about the giraffe with a sore throat? Try the one about the giraffe with a kink in her neck. It's no joke to the people at the Santa Barbara Zoo. They're baffled by the very noticeable zigzag halfway up the neck of the 4-year-old female giraffe. It's so striking that the gangly animal has become one of the newer attractions at the zoo.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1998 | JANE HULSE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When the sci-fi movie classic "Planet of the Apes" turns 30 this month, the Santa Barbara Zoo will be going a little ape. In a sort of life-imitating-art-imitating-life move, the zoo will show the movie Sunday inside the glass-enclosed viewing area of the lush, rock-lined gorilla compound. Visitors will not be the only ones watching Charlton Heston encounter a world where apes are the master race and humans their slaves. The screen will be angled so the zoo's three resident gorillas can watch too. "We don't know how they will react," said zoo spokeswoman Kelly Rogers.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1997 | JANE HULSE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Everyone knows a leopard can't change its spots, but at the Santa Barbara zoo they know how to multiply them. The zoo's resident leopard couple produced three kittens in April, and visitors can now see them tumble around their jungle-like enclosure, climbing tree trunks and wrestling with each other. The rare, endangered Amur leopard kittens aren't the only new arrivals at the Santa Barbara Zoological Gardens.
NEWS
December 15, 1994 | JANE HULSE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Christmas is almost here. The tree is up, the presents are wrapped and maybe the stockings are even hung. So where's the snow, your kids ask? Tell them Santa Barbara. The Santa Barbara Zoo will have literally tons of the white stuff for kids to play in Saturday and Sunday. The zoo people call it their Wild Winter Wonderland and, along with the snow, they will have Santa, a North Pole exhibit and such activities as making tree ornaments.
NEWS
May 30, 2011 | By Terry Gardner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Young fans of the movie “How to Train Your Dragon” will want to catch the new show at the Santa Barbara Zoo, in which a Tyrannosaurus Rex demonstrates how animals can be trained to receive special care at the zoo. Duncan the dinosaur stars in “ How to Train Your Dinosaur, ” in which hosts use the robo dino to show families how the zoo’s animals receive care, including how the creatures let trainers brush their teeth. This lifelike T. Rex is 15 ½ -feet long from nose to tail and 7 feet tall.  It was created by the Chiodo Brothers , a Hollywood creature shop, and Duncan can run, roar, snort, growl, sneeze, blink and even, um, take a comfort break with the help of the operator inside, who controls his actions.  In the 15-minute show, Duncan allows his teeth to be brushed with a giant toothbrush.
TRAVEL
November 21, 2010
SAN DIEGO December Nights When, where: Dec. 3 and 4, Balboa Park Highlights: More than 300,000 people are expected for this annual event, during which admission to all museums will be free. Holiday-themed offerings include live entertainment, rides for children, a Native American village and food from around the world. Cost: Free Info: (619) 239-0512, http://www.balboapark.org/decembernights SANTA BARBARA Snow Leopard Festival and Sledding at the Zoo When, where: Dec. 5, Santa Barbara Zoo Highlights: The zoo celebrates two things foreign to the Southland: snow and the endangered leopard.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2009 | Charlie Amter
Mira Sorvino has only called California home for just shy of a decade, but the actress has been a known quantity in Hollywood for far longer. She first Ever since the thespian burst onto the scene in the mid-1990s with high-profile roles such as her turn as a the shrill-voiced hooker with a shrill voice in Woody Allen's "Mighty Aphrodite." in the mid 1990s, she has been working steadily.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A giant male anteater, misnamed Sophie, has died at the Santa Barbara Zoo. A zoo press release says Sophie, the longest-lived captive-born male in U.S. zoo history, was euthanized on Jan. 31. Alan Varsik, director of animal programs and conservation, said the initial necropsy found severe arthritis. Varsik says zoo officials "observed a significant decline in his mobility and apparent comfort in recent weeks." Misidentified at birth as a female, Sophie was born in July 1986 at the Jackson Zoo in Mississippi and had lived at the Santa Barbara Zoo since December 1986.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2008 | Steve Chawkins, Times Staff Writer
Gemina, a much-visited Baringo giraffe who held her head high on a mysteriously crooked neck, has died at the Santa Barbara Zoo. She was 21. "She was the most famous individual we had," said Alan Varsik, the zoo's director of animal programs and conservation. "She's been a part of Santa Barbara for a long time."
NEWS
February 13, 1992 | JANE HULSE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Santa Barbara Zoo has a new look. Gone is the popular farmyard area by the entrance where children could feed crackers to the goats and pet the sheep. It's been moved to a new Discovery Area, which zoo officials opened last month. Don't look for the goats, though. All 11 of them died last year from a bacterial infection. Instead, the area has a mix of new animals you won't find in any farmyard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Santa Barbara Zoo's two Asian elephants are wintering in Fresno. When Sujatha (Suzi) and Little Mac return next year, they will find a $2.5-million enclosure renovation that gives them more room and a pool. The project also includes regrading visitor paths leading to the enclosure to conform to the Americans With Disabilities Act. The renovation should be completed by June.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2003 | William Overend, Times Staff Writer
The most expensive housing region in the state is the scenic south coast of Santa Barbara County, where the median price of a home is $825,000 and is forecast to close in on $1 million in two years. This isn't some small enclave of the rich like Malibu or San Marino. It's a region of 200,000 people, stretching 25 miles along the coast from Carpinteria to Goleta. Once a home to rich and poor, it remains a patchwork of mansions, tract homes and farms.
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