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NEWS
January 8, 2001 | JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With California's unstable electrical system threatening temporary blackouts that could cost them hundreds of millions of dollars in the months ahead, Silicon Valley businesses are resorting to every trick in the book to make sure they stay humming. Companies that make chips or run other firms' Web sites are cutting deals to keep most of their power in times of crisis. Engineers are designing state-funded software to help others drop electricity use on demand.
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NEWS
January 8, 2001 | JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With California's unstable electrical system threatening temporary blackouts that could cost them hundreds of millions of dollars in the months ahead, Silicon Valley businesses are resorting to every trick in the book to make sure they stay humming. Companies that make chips or run other firms' Web sites are cutting deals to keep most of their power in times of crisis. Engineers are designing state-funded software to help others drop electricity use on demand.
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BUSINESS
February 23, 1993 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The presidential roadshow paused in Silicon Valley for 18 hours Sunday and Monday, but in that brief period President Clinton went a long way toward cementing a politically potent alliance with the high-tech community. From a Sunday dinner with 30 local technology executives to a Monday morning tour of computer manufacturer Silicon Graphics Inc.
BUSINESS
November 29, 2000 | From Associated Press
Even as some of their past business investments went bust, venture capitalists remained on a fund-raising roll in the third quarter, fattening their bankrolls for future start-ups. The venture capital industry raised $27.9 billion during the three months ended Sept. 30, with the money spread across 108 funds, according to data released Tuesday by Venture Economics, a research firm. The flood of money pouring into venture funds was up 153% from the $11.
BUSINESS
May 7, 1991 | RUSSEL BLINCH, REUTERS
High-tech culture was born in the Silicon Valley, but relentless Japanese competition and California's labor and housing costs, traffic jams and dwindling water supplies are tarnishing the legendary computer heartland. "We've grown so fast and so rapidly that we are facing a certain period of maturation," said Gary Burke, president of the Santa Clara Manufacturing Group, an association of companies in the area.
NEWS
May 19, 1998 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Responding to loud pleas from the Silicon Valley, the Senate voted overwhelmingly Monday to allow as many as 30,000 additional foreign engineers and other high-tech workers into the country during the next four months. Designed to address the labor shortage in the burgeoning information-technology industry, which is expected to create as many as 1.3 million jobs during the next decade, the bill boosts the annual cap on temporary visas for such skilled workers to 95,000 until 2002.
NEWS
July 8, 1997 | MARK Z. BARABAK, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
When Larry Gerston produced one of the standard texts on California politics 14 years ago, he wrote about the influence of Hollywood, agribusiness and the aerospace industry. But not a word was devoted to the Silicon Valley, an omission that persisted through several revisions, myriad statewide campaigns, a steep recession and a percolating recovery.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1993 | DANIEL AKST
Not long ago, people always talked about Route 128 in Massachusetts and California's Silicon Valley in the same breath. Both were virgin territory on the frontier of computer technology, near sources of capital both financial and intellectual. That's not true anymore. Silicon Valley, the strip of sunshine north of San Jose, has badly eclipsed its forested eastern counterpart.
BUSINESS
January 9, 1999 | CHARLES PILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of California's key engines of economic growth--Silicon Valley--is in danger of stalling because of a severe shortage of affordable housing and a widening income and education gap between rich and poor, whites and minorities, according to a report to be released Sunday. "These issues are on the minds of virtually everyone. They really see a threat," said Doug Henton, research director of the report, produced for the nonprofit Joint Venture: Silicon Valley Network.
NEWS
September 23, 1998 | CHARLES PILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beset by scandal and shunned even by many in his own party, Bill Clinton will leave Washington this week to visit some of his most loyal and generous allies. His destination: Silicon Valley. The president expects to raise a tidy sum for Democrats at a fund-raiser Friday at the new Tech Museum of Innovation in San Jose. Against the backdrop of the presidential sex scandal, the stakes for the Democrats continuing to hold sway over Silicon Valley are huge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2000 | MARGARET TALEV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County growers and elected officials on Thursday praised a court ruling that stalls the massive Newhall Ranch housing development east of Fillmore in Los Angeles County, saying the decision preserves the Santa Clara Valley's pastoral charm, if only for a while. "Whiskey's for drinking, water's for fighting!"
BUSINESS
May 18, 1999 | Charles Piller
A widening gap between Silicon Valley's fast-growing demand for qualified employees and locally available high-tech workers costs companies up to $4 billion annually in recruitment costs and constrained growth, according to a report to be released today. About one-third of the employees needed annually are either hired from outside the area or the jobs go unfilled, according to the report by San Jose-based Joint Venture: Silicon Valley Network, a policy research group.
BUSINESS
January 9, 1999 | CHARLES PILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of California's key engines of economic growth--Silicon Valley--is in danger of stalling because of a severe shortage of affordable housing and a widening income and education gap between rich and poor, whites and minorities, according to a report to be released Sunday. "These issues are on the minds of virtually everyone. They really see a threat," said Doug Henton, research director of the report, produced for the nonprofit Joint Venture: Silicon Valley Network.
NEWS
September 23, 1998 | CHARLES PILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beset by scandal and shunned even by many in his own party, Bill Clinton will leave Washington this week to visit some of his most loyal and generous allies. His destination: Silicon Valley. The president expects to raise a tidy sum for Democrats at a fund-raiser Friday at the new Tech Museum of Innovation in San Jose. Against the backdrop of the presidential sex scandal, the stakes for the Democrats continuing to hold sway over Silicon Valley are huge.
NEWS
May 19, 1998 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Responding to loud pleas from the Silicon Valley, the Senate voted overwhelmingly Monday to allow as many as 30,000 additional foreign engineers and other high-tech workers into the country during the next four months. Designed to address the labor shortage in the burgeoning information-technology industry, which is expected to create as many as 1.3 million jobs during the next decade, the bill boosts the annual cap on temporary visas for such skilled workers to 95,000 until 2002.
BUSINESS
April 29, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Knight Ridder on Tuesday said it will move its headquarters to Silicon Valley from Miami in a bid to remake its image into a high-technology information provider from a traditional newspaper company. Of 150 corporate employees, Knight Ridder estimated that about 65 top executives, including Chairman and Chief Executive Tony Ridder, would relocate to California, where the company owns the San Jose Mercury News and several other newspapers.
BUSINESS
April 29, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Knight Ridder on Tuesday said it will move its headquarters to Silicon Valley from Miami in a bid to remake its image into a high-technology information provider from a traditional newspaper company. Of 150 corporate employees, Knight Ridder estimated that about 65 top executives, including Chairman and Chief Executive Tony Ridder, would relocate to California, where the company owns the San Jose Mercury News and several other newspapers.
BUSINESS
November 29, 2000 | From Associated Press
Even as some of their past business investments went bust, venture capitalists remained on a fund-raising roll in the third quarter, fattening their bankrolls for future start-ups. The venture capital industry raised $27.9 billion during the three months ended Sept. 30, with the money spread across 108 funds, according to data released Tuesday by Venture Economics, a research firm. The flood of money pouring into venture funds was up 153% from the $11.
NEWS
July 8, 1997 | MARK Z. BARABAK, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
When Larry Gerston produced one of the standard texts on California politics 14 years ago, he wrote about the influence of Hollywood, agribusiness and the aerospace industry. But not a word was devoted to the Silicon Valley, an omission that persisted through several revisions, myriad statewide campaigns, a steep recession and a percolating recovery.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1993 | DANIEL AKST
Not long ago, people always talked about Route 128 in Massachusetts and California's Silicon Valley in the same breath. Both were virgin territory on the frontier of computer technology, near sources of capital both financial and intellectual. That's not true anymore. Silicon Valley, the strip of sunshine north of San Jose, has badly eclipsed its forested eastern counterpart.
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