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Santa Clara Valley Water District

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NEWS
February 23, 1989
Officials in San Joaquin County and the Santa Clara Valley are taking steps to reduce water use in the face of continuing drought conditions that have lowered reservoir levels. In San Joaquin County, a local water emergency has been declared, and officials say rationing may be ordered later if voluntary conservation fails. In the Santa Clara Valley, water district officials warn that they may reduce or suspend pumping ground water if water customers do not cut back their use by 45%.
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NEWS
March 20, 1989
An offer by IBM Corp. to pump millions of gallons of water with low levels of industrial solvents to Santa Clara Valley households has been met with skepticism by environmentalists and water district officials. IBM says the treated water from its South San Jose property, now being dumped, contains low levels of chemical solvents, but is well within the state limits for drinking water supplies.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Alviso residents, who for two years have argued that weeds and silt clogging the Guadalupe River expose them to the risk of floods, will get some help this winter. On Tuesday, the Santa Clara Valley Water District board delayed a decision on whether to cut the weeds that have drastically narrowed the river channel through Alviso Slough during the last 20 years. Instead, it launched a program to find out what extra flood protection measures can be taken before this winter's rains begin.
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Federal water officials have agreed to give Santa Clara County a "hardship" allocation of Central Valley water, but it still won't be enough to make up for the drought-caused shortage. "I think it's better than a sharp stick in the eye . . . but I'm disappointed it's not higher," said Robert Gross, chairman of the Santa Clara Valley Water District board of directors. District officials said the federal allocation makes up about a fourth of the drought-caused shortage.
NEWS
November 9, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The earthquake that struck Northern California on Oct. 17 caused little or no damage to most of the 102 dams within 50 miles of its epicenter, state engineers reported. The most severe cracking was to the Austrian Dam on Lake Elsman, owned by the San Jose Water Co., seven miles south-southeast of Los Gatos and about eight miles from the epicenter, they said. Engineers conducted the survey for the Division of Safety of Dams, which is in the Department of Water Resources.
NEWS
March 13, 1991 | From Associated Press
Recent storms that drenched Northern California brought substantial runoff to local reservoirs, enough in some cases to ease the threat of more stringent water restrictions. But water officials remain cautious in the fifth year of a drought. Reservoirs in Marin County, across the Golden Gate Bridge from San Francisco, were up to 44% of capacity Tuesday, a big jump from the 31% recorded only two weeks ago. Santa Clara County's reservoirs were at 16.6%, up from 10% in the same period.
NEWS
February 28, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
President Reagan has approved federal disaster assistance for 16 additional counties ravaged by flooding in Northern California, Gov. George Deukmejian announced Thursday. In the meantime, the body of a Lake County construction worker was found in Dry Creek near Roseville. The death of Daniel Miller, 44, of Kelseyville, brought to at least 15 the number of people who died in the floods that began Feb. 12 and continued through last weekend.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1992 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A wintry storm from the Gulf of Alaska dropped a record 0.48 of an inch of rain on downtown Los Angeles and three times that much on some Southland foothill communities Friday, snarling traffic for motorists hoping to get off to a quick start for the Halloween weekend. For trick-or-treaters, however, the news is good: skies should be mostly clear by the time they start making their rounds tonight.
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