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Santa Clarita Ca Celebrations

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1997 | DADE HAYES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like many human beings, Santa Clarita spent its youth shocking its sober-sided elders with unusual experiments in bohemian living. Its reputation for offbeat--the critics said bizarre--public policy innovations made it the stuff of jokes on late-night TV shows. City officials once gathered local barbers and beauticians to learn what was on residents' minds, figuring that most people reveal what they're thinking to the person who does their hair.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1997 | DADE HAYES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like many human beings, Santa Clarita spent its youth shocking its sober-sided elders with unusual experiments in bohemian living. Its reputation for offbeat--the critics said bizarre--public policy innovations made it the stuff of jokes on late-night TV shows. City officials once gathered local barbers and beauticians to learn what was on residents' minds, figuring that most people reveal what they're thinking to the person who does their hair.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1992 | JEFF PRUGH
A make-believe Great Train Robbery will help dedicate Santa Clarita's new Metrolink commuter rail platform at 10 a.m. Saturday, next door to the Saugus Speedway on Soledad Canyon Road. The stunt performance will re-create a celebrated robbery that occurred at the site Nov. 10, 1929, when "Buffalo Tom" Vernon derailed a northbound train and forced passengers at gunpoint to surrender cash totaling $200.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1996 | DANICA KIRKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The movies have been good to cowboys. Buckaroos like John Wayne never lied, cheated or stole--and loved their country to boot. The movies have been good to Santa Clarita too. This city's spare canyons have provided the lonesomely scenic backdrop to many a western shoot'em-up. The community named a park and high school after movie legend William S. Hart, who lived in Newhall from 1928 to 1946.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1996 | DANICA KIRKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The movies have been good to cowboys. Buckaroos like John Wayne never lied, cheated or stole--and loved their country to boot. The movies have been good to Santa Clarita too. This city's spare canyons have provided the lonesomely scenic backdrop to many a western shoot'em-up. The community named a park and high school after movie legend William S. Hart, who lived in Newhall from 1928 to 1946.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1994 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
City officials are heralding the three-day Cowboy Poetry, Music and Film Festival as a "huge success" because it cost the city under $2,700 to sponsor, tens of thousands of dollars less than originally anticipated. "We think that if the earthquake hadn't happened, we would have made money on this," said spokeswoman Gail Foy. City staff originally estimated that the event, held the weekend of March 25, could cost the city as much as $43,000 to sponsor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1994 | SAM ENRIQUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a glance it was near impossible to tell the cowpokes from the computer nerds who showed up Sunday for Santa Clarita's Cowboy Poetry, Music and Film Festival. Wanna-bes in denim, pointy boots and wide-brim hats filled the dirt streets of the Melody Ranch, a Western movie lot hired for the three-day festival that drew more than 3,000 visitors. "Do you think anyplace in the Los Angeles area could be as perfect as this?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1993 | JOHN DART
With 14 pastors and several thousand participants, the event had little of the right-wing rhetoric usually heard at such gatherings. When theologically and culturally conservative Christians gather publicly for shows of strength, invigorated by songs and prayers with a touch of martial rhetoric, it is rare that abortion, homosexuality and the perceived sins of liberal politicians go unmentioned.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1991 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Old West didn't have elephants, but Santa Clarita's celebration of its pioneer past does. As in the past, the 27th annual Frontier Days festival will celebrate the community's Western heritage with a rodeo, country music concerts and Western dance lessons. But this year's celebration also has a few things that were rarely glimpsed in the days when cattle ranches dotted the Santa Clarita Valley: elephant rides, helicopters-for-hire and even one of Elvis Presley's cars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1994 | JOHN DART
"Marches for Jesus" taking place today in 170 countries and 500 U.S. locales--including Santa Clarita, Glendale and Chatsworth--aren't quite lock-step martial parades, but the national organizers do expect a lot of conformity. The controlled nature of the celebrations is considered one reason why the annual mile-and-a-half jaunts have caught on since the first March for Jesus seven years ago in London and the 150 marches in the United States two years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1995 | MARK SABBATINI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Residents are preparing to give the city a spring cleaning Saturday as part of the annual Santa Clarita Valley Pride Week, an event that collected about 100 tons of trash last year, authorities said. Youth groups, churches and other organizations will spend the day cleaning public areas, planting trees and working on other projects, Kevin Tonoian, the city's Pride Week coordinator, said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1994 | JOHN DART
"Marches for Jesus" taking place today in 170 countries and 500 U.S. locales--including Santa Clarita, Glendale and Chatsworth--aren't quite lock-step martial parades, but the national organizers do expect a lot of conformity. The controlled nature of the celebrations is considered one reason why the annual mile-and-a-half jaunts have caught on since the first March for Jesus seven years ago in London and the 150 marches in the United States two years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1994 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Northridge earthquake has claimed yet another victim--the favored route of the annual Fourth of July parade. The parade has traditionally taken a route between William S. Hart and Henry Mayo Newhall parks, winding north up San Fernando Road, west along Lyons Avenue, north along Orchard Village Road and east on Dalby Drive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1994 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
City officials are heralding the three-day Cowboy Poetry, Music and Film Festival as a "huge success" because it cost the city under $2,700 to sponsor, tens of thousands of dollars less than originally anticipated. "We think that if the earthquake hadn't happened, we would have made money on this," said spokeswoman Gail Foy. City staff originally estimated that the event, held the weekend of March 25, could cost the city as much as $43,000 to sponsor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1994 | SAM ENRIQUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a glance it was near impossible to tell the cowpokes from the computer nerds who showed up Sunday for Santa Clarita's Cowboy Poetry, Music and Film Festival. Wanna-bes in denim, pointy boots and wide-brim hats filled the dirt streets of the Melody Ranch, a Western movie lot hired for the three-day festival that drew more than 3,000 visitors. "Do you think anyplace in the Los Angeles area could be as perfect as this?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1993 | JOHN DART
With 14 pastors and several thousand participants, the event had little of the right-wing rhetoric usually heard at such gatherings. When theologically and culturally conservative Christians gather publicly for shows of strength, invigorated by songs and prayers with a touch of martial rhetoric, it is rare that abortion, homosexuality and the perceived sins of liberal politicians go unmentioned.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1994 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Northridge earthquake has claimed yet another victim--the favored route of the annual Fourth of July parade. The parade has traditionally taken a route between William S. Hart and Henry Mayo Newhall parks, winding north up San Fernando Road, west along Lyons Avenue, north along Orchard Village Road and east on Dalby Drive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1993 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ruben Urquiza raised his fist in what looked for all the world like a gang salute. Except it wasn't. "Oh yeah, Jesus!" the 23-year-old cried, waving his fist in a circle at a crowd of mostly white suburbanites who spilled into three lanes and over the curb along Valencia Street in Santa Clarita on Saturday. They were participating in a worldwide event called the March for Jesus.
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