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Santa Clarita Ca Development And Redevelopment

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1993 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They moved from The Valley to this valley in 1984, before procreation changed the family portrait. Sandy and Elaine Senen had been renting in Sherman Oaks when housing prices beckoned them up Interstate 5 to the new tracts of the Santa Clarita Valley. They became homeowners, but the trade-off was Sandy's 50-minute commute to work in the Mid-Wilshire district.
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BUSINESS
July 24, 2001 | BOB HOWARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Santa Clarita developer Spirit Properties has broken ground for about 120,000 square feet of buildings in the first phase of a planned 3-million-square-foot, $156-million industrial project. Called Centre Pointe Business Park, the 240-acre development in Santa Clarita is bounded by Soledad Canyon, Redview Drive and Ruether Avenue. Plans call for the 3 million square feet to be developed over the next three years, said Larry Rasmussen, president of Spirit, the property's owner.
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BUSINESS
June 18, 1991 | JOHN MEDEARIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gail Foy wouldn't want to live anyplace that looks like her old vision of a mobile-home park: "a whole bunch of these homes-on-wheels plopped on a great big lot with maybe a tree at the end." But Foy does want to own a house in the city of Santa Clarita, where she works, and she can't afford a conventional house on a private lot there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
Santa Clarita on Wednesday gained a bit more say over development outside its borders, but far less than the city had sought. The Los Angeles County Local Agency Formation Commission approved the addition of 32 square miles of area to the city's so-called sphere of influence, largely in the Saugus area from the city's northern border to Angeles National Forest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1995 | MAKI BECKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
City officials and social workers broke ground Wednesday for a 64-unit apartment building specifically for local low-income senior citizens. A demographic analysis done in 1991 showed that there is a substantial need for affordable housing for older residents in the area, said Ben Beckler, director of project development with Southern California Presbyterian Homes, a Glendale-based nonprofit organization that is spearheading the project.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2001 | BOB HOWARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Santa Clarita developer Spirit Properties has broken ground for about 120,000 square feet of buildings in the first phase of a planned 3-million-square-foot, $156-million industrial project. Called Centre Pointe Business Park, the 240-acre development in Santa Clarita is bounded by Soledad Canyon, Redview Drive and Ruether Avenue. Plans call for the 3 million square feet to be developed over the next three years, said Larry Rasmussen, president of Spirit, the property's owner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1999 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last time the bucolic calm of Santa Clarita was this rattled it was over a proposed 720-acre landfill, which would have been one of the country's largest. Folks showed up at City Hall en masse, angry and vocal. Not in my backyard, they screamed. Once again, the burg just over the hill from Los Angeles is up in arms. This time, however, many Santa Claritans desperately covet what L.A. has and they lack. Nordstrom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1994 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dozens of residents here are sending up a flare about a massive residential development to be built on the site of an old munitions factory in the center of the city. Several people warned the City Council at its meeting Tuesday that the 2,911-unit Porta Bella housing project is fraught with potential liability for the city because of likely leftover contamination on the property and a questionable road system. "We're not opposed to development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1995 | MARK SABBATINI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Demonstrators gathered Wednesday at a market that had long been a local landmark but was now scheduled for demolition. The Fire Department had planned to ignite the abandoned building, formerly known as Dillenbeck's Market, and use the occasion as a training exercise for firefighters. But in a twist on conservancy movements that have swept the nation, the 25 demonstrators at this site were not there to try to save the building.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1994 | MARK SABBATINI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Young adults displaced from jobs because of the Northridge earthquake will get a chance to work on local rebuilding projects while saving the city money, thanks to an emergency federal grant. The Santa Clarita City Council unanimously voted Tuesday night to hire 15 people through the California Conservation Corps to pick up debris and perform other repair work, said John Danielson, parks and recreation superintendent for the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2001 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN and PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Santa Clarita gained a bit more say Wednesday over development outside its borders, but far less than the city had sought. The Los Angeles County Local Agency Formation Commission approved the addition of 32 square miles to the city's so-called sphere of influence, largely in the Saugus area, from the city's northern border to Angeles National Forest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2001 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Sand Canyon, the city of Santa Clarita bans curbs, sidewalks and street lights, to better preserve the rural equestrian atmosphere. But at the border, concrete gutters appear, discouraging horses but pleasing planners for Los Angeles County. In the Santa Clarita Valley, the tip-off of the city-county boundary is often the abrupt disappearance of a bike lane or equestrian trail. Bulldozers carve cliffs into hillsides on one side of a freeway, while the other is smoothly graded.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2001 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The use of noise machines to frighten away two endangered species of migratory birds from a construction site in Santa Clarita violates federal law, environmental groups have alleged. The electronic devices were used by Newhall Land & Farming Co. in violation of the Endangered Species Act, according to the Center for Biological Diversity, Friends of the Santa Clara River and the Sierra Club.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2001 | CAROL CHAMBERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An environmental watchdog group jumped into the battle over development in the Santa Clarita Valley on Wednesday by threatening to sue federal agencies for allegedly failing to protect habitats of the California red-legged frog and the southwestern arroyo toad in the Santa Clara River basin and its tributaries. The Center for Biological Diversity asserted that the U.S. Department of the Interior, the Army Corps of Engineers and the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2001 | CAROL CHAMBERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Santa Clarita city officials and residents have squared off against a mining company seeking county approval to extract 56 million tons of sand and gravel from a site just east of the city. As part of a $1.2-million campaign against the project, the city commissioned a study that concluded the mine would probably decrease the value of 9,600 existing and approved homes within five miles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1999 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last time the bucolic calm of Santa Clarita was this rattled it was over a proposed 720-acre landfill, which would have been one of the country's largest. Folks showed up at City Hall en masse, angry and vocal. Not in my backyard, they screamed. Once again, the burg just over the hill from Los Angeles is up in arms. This time, however, many Santa Claritans desperately covet what L.A. has and they lack. Nordstrom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1992 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the presence of about 1,400 impoverished senior citizens in the Santa Clarita Valley, a federal housing agency has rejected a request to fund a housing project there because the community is predominantly white. The Los Angeles office of the U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development last month rejected the proposed $4.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1996 | DANICA KIRKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Attempting to throw in the towel after two years of bitter controversy, Santa Clarita City Manager George Caravalho agreed this week to drop plans for a $1.1-billion dollar redevelopment project inspired by the damage inflicted by the Northridge earthquake. But despite that key concession, the region's most powerful water agency, a longtime foe of the project, refused to make a deal that would avert a costly court battle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1998 | JENNIFER PENDLETON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It could be called "Hollywood North," if that nickname weren't already taken--ironically enough, by Vancouver. Santa Clarita, less than 30 miles from Tinseltown's hub, emerged in the 1990s as a major film-production center, home to "Melrose Place," "Jag," "The Mighty Morphin Power Rangers" and other television fare, plus commercials and feature films. Today, business is booming.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1998 | DARRELL SATZMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Having outgrown its Placerita Canyon home of the past 30 years, the city's largest Protestant church will move next week into a larger, more modern facility near Seco Canyon. Grace Baptist Church, which typically draws more than 4,500 worshipers to its six weekly services, is finally ready to move to the site it purchased more than seven years ago, said the Rev. David Leathers, family life pastor at the church. The new location is a 23-acre hillside parcel at 22833 W. Copper Hill Road in Saugus.
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