Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSanta Clarita Ca Development And Redevelopment
IN THE NEWS

Santa Clarita Ca Development And Redevelopment

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1996 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Archeologist Dave Whitley stands on a scrub-covered, wind-swept hill, a site indistinguishable to the naked eye from dozens of other undeveloped hilltops visible from this spot in the wilds of Santa Clarita. But for Whitley, this hilltop is a special place. In 1804, Spanish missionaries established an outpost here that marked what is believed to be the first white settlement in northern Los Angeles County.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1996 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state agency has ruled that four top officials of the Castaic Lake Water Agency did not violate conflict of interest laws in a series of decisions affecting the region's largest developer, even though each had financial ties to that company. The decision by state Fair Political Practices Commission staff members normally would close the investigation.
NEWS
February 29, 1996 | DANICA KIRKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The city scrapped its $1.1-billion redevelopment plan Wednesday, conceding that it faced years of costly court battles that could stall earthquake reconstruction indefinitely. The move came as part of an out-of-court settlement with the Castaic Lake Water Agency that permits both powerful entities to save face after months of public bickering in which both claimed to have the public's best interests in mind.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 1996 | DANICA KIRKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Santa Clarita City Council has approved a 20-year development agreement for the biggest single project in city history, clearing the way for construction after years of wrangling over the terms. The unanimous vote by the City Council on Tuesday came despite repeated protests of a handful of residents who pleaded for the council to stall the long-debated Porta Bella project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1996 | DANICA KIRKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Attempting to throw in the towel after two years of bitter controversy, Santa Clarita City Manager George Caravalho agreed this week to drop plans for a $1.1-billion dollar redevelopment project inspired by the damage inflicted by the Northridge earthquake. But despite that key concession, the region's most powerful water agency, a longtime foe of the project, refused to make a deal that would avert a costly court battle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1996
Redrawing District Boundaries The Newhall Land & Farming Co. has asked Los Angeles County education officials to change school district boundaries so that all students from its proposed Newhall Ranch project will be in the Newhall School District. The northernmost portion of the project, above the Santa Clara River, is now in the Castaic Union School District. Source: Times staff
NEWS
February 5, 1996 | DANICA KIRKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Cowboy movie hero Harry Carey bought a ranch in this sprawling canyon as a getaway for his pals Clark Cable, Will Rogers and Gary Cooper. These days, locals call it the "Farmer John" ranch after the meat-packing family that purchased the land in the 1950s. But developers of a 1,795-acre housing development there have given the ranch a new moniker: Tesoro del Valle, "Treasure of the Valley."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1996 | DANICA KIRKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The city of Santa Clarita's $1.1-billion development plan was dealt a fresh setback Friday, as a Superior Court judge tentatively ruled that the city's earthquake recovery plans went beyond the scope of the disaster. Judge David A. Horowitz's unsigned review came only a few weeks after a state appeals court shot down the plan on different grounds. City officials have vowed to appeal that ruling and seemed undaunted by the new challenge in Horowitz's comments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1996 | DANICA KIRKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Northridge earthquake continues to dog Santa Clarita's leaders, as the City Council cracks down on property owners who have failed to fix earthquake-ravaged homes. Without dissent, the council Tuesday night demanded a report from the staff employees before its next meeting on the status of repairs in a particularly hard-hit area of Valencia. The city suffered $144 million in private property damage in the 1994 quake.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|